Create a Publicity Brochure Lesson Plan

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Time
Year Level
Prerequisites
Materials [This lesson plan is supported by the Identifying Key Terms Teacher Resource.]
2 - 3 lessons
9 - 10
Before undertaking this project students will have demonstrated: the ability to search, comprehend and use information from news articles and editorials; the ability to search, comprehend and use information from maps, photographs and advertising material; the ability to connect pieces of information; the ability to use the chosen citation style; and an understanding of constructive feedback and its appropriate use.
It is recommended that before undertaking this lesson students complete the complementary lessons: Identifying Key Terms Lesson Plan, Identifying Key Facts Lesson Plan, Identifying the Source Lesson Plan and Build a Bibliography Lesson Plan.
Overhead display or whiteboard.
Selection of sample publicity brochures.
Word processor or workbook and pen.
Description
History is rarely practised in isolation - historians are usually involved in producing something within a different disciplinary area. In this lesson students will be exposed to this notion by: individually identifying the important elements of a publicity brochure; sharing their choices; engaging in critical discussion in order to challenge their own and others' understanding; testing their ideas through the practical application of historical knowledge to the production of an object; then responding to set questions and prompts to produce their reflection on learning.
Curriculum Connections
At Year 8 level the Australian Curriculum (History) elaborates students as using scaffolds illustrating the structural and language features of particular text types in order to create a text that communicates specific findings about the past. At Year 9 level the Australian Curriculum (History) elaborates students as creating a travel brochure (incorporating written text and graphics). At Year 10 level the Australian Curriculum (History) elaborates students as designing a poster that outlines the main arguments against a particular historical action and explaining the nature and reliability of the sources used to construct the poster.[1]
Program
This lesson is part of the Create a Publicity Brochure for the Lucas Clothing Factory in 1919 program.
Theme
This lesson is part of the Product-oriented Activity theme.
Learning Outcomes
By the end of this lesson students will: understand that publicity brochures may be constructed with different key elements; be able to sort these key elements into relative categories; understand that classification of the terms involves the use of evaluation criteria; be able to apply evaluation criteria to the classification of key elements of a publicity brochure; be able to express judgment of their own and fellow learners' value of information and ideas; and begin to locate historical knowledge in a broader context.
Activity Type
Students will engage in activities that allow them to express their divergent knowledge (through individually producing an artefact).
Thinking skill developed
This lesson will involve students in higher level thinking involving synthesis (imagining how a given client might want to advertise their company and designing a project within given parameters).
Assessment Type
Students will be assessed on their demonstration of diverse skills, including: their ability to sort information; their ability to give reasons for their actions; their ability to make informed decisions; their creativity; and their ability to apply evaluation criteria.

Contents

Lead in

Brief revision of the previous lesson - Build a Bibliography Lesson Plan.

Outline the purpose of the project. (You may want to motivate the students to create these brochures for a mock "trade fair", or some similar activity.)

What do students know?

Teacher-lead discussion using the following questions...

  • Question 1: What is a publicity brochure?
  • Question 2: When we make our own publicity brochure, what do we include in it? (Show some publicity brochures as examples - making sure that there are different styles. e.g. A4, bi-fold, tri-fold, with pictures, black-and-white, etc. Link this discussion to the assessment criteria - get the students thinking about 'audiences', 'messages', 'key facts', etc.)

Write a list of these elements on the board and have students copy this list into their workbooks.

Activity

Introduction and motivation

Introduce the method by which the brochures are to be produced. (Although publishing with computer software is preferable, you should choose a method with which they are already familiar to ensure greater oportunities for successful completion of the task.)


For groups where a number of the students are unable to use available software, have all students produce the brochures by cut and paste. (In this case the object is to produce 'mock ups' - an essential step in the process of advertising - rather than final products.)


[This task needs to be saved for inclusion with the reflection on learning.]

  • Question: Given that method that is to be used, what style of brochure would be best for a publicity brochure for the Lucas Clothing Factory? (Students to answer without discussion - listing the reasons for their choice in their workbooks. Limit the time for this task to no more than a few minutes.)

Exposure to conflict situations

Without discussion, have each student share their choice of brochure and their reasons.

Construction of new ideas

Students to participate in a structured critical discussion of their individual choices.

  • Question 1: (To all students.) In what ways does the short time-limit make it hard to define your reasons for your choice of style? (Ask for particular examples.)
  • Question 2: (To the other students.) Did anybody else find a way to deal with this problem?
  • Question 3: (To all students.) Are there other ways this difficulty may have been overcome?

Evaluation

[Students to add this to their workbook - to be submitted with their reflection on learning.]


  • Question 1: (Thinking of those who chose a similar style.) What reasons did they have that were the same as mine? What reasons did they have that were different from mine?
  • Question 2: (Thinking of those who chose a different style.)

What reasons did they have that were the same as mine? What reasons did they have that were different from mine?

  • Question 3: Can I see a way to improve my publicity brochure by considering the reasons of others? (Detail specific why/why not answers.)

Application of new ideas

Students to sketch a draft of the style of their publicity brochure for the Lucas Clothing Factory - with annotations of what will be included in each section and the possible sources to be used.


Once this has been reviewed and okayed by the teacher, students are to source the relevant inclusions and create the brochure or 'mock up'.

Reflection on learning

[Recommended to be used as a homework task.]


Students to write a reflection on learning by responding to the following questions and prompt...

  • What reasons did other students express about the best style for the publicity brochure with which I agree? Why?
  • What reasons did other students express about the best style for the publicity brochure with which I disagree? Why?
  • My understanding of the reasons for choosing a certain style of publicity brochure for a particular purpose has changed in these ways...
  • The group discussion has helped my understanding of publicity brochures by...

Closure

Ask for volunteers to share their brochure with the class. Encourage them to talk about the experience of making the brochure and what they have learned. Ask them to seek constructive feedback from their peers.

Individualising learning

Remedial

For students with low reading and comprehension abilities, it is suggested that the individual exercise be modified in the following way...

Before you lead the lesson prepare 3 templates for brochures so that students are dealing with the key aspects of publicity brochures as identified by you.


Prepare them for the critical discussion with this question...

  • Choose one of these templates for your project. Why is that template the best for your project. (Hint: What are the things that you have to do to fill in the spaces?)


Extension

Have students look at their own final product and produce a critique of it as if they are the marketing manager for the Lucas Clothing Factory.

  • Question 1: How does this brochure represent the Lucas Clothing Factory? (Does it tell what we do? Who we are? What sort of workplace we have? What sort of people we are? Our role within the community? Why people should purchase our goods?)
  • Question 2: Do the choices you made at the start of the project mean you could successfully represent the Lucas Clothing Factory in a publicity brochure? What choices could you change to have made the publicity brochure more successful?

Assessment

4 3 2 1 0
Content
Introduction - message and audience Highlights main points, without providing details. Message demonstrates creativity. All audiences identified. Highlights main points, with some details. Message is properly constructed. All audiences identified. Some overview of main points. Message is clear, but poorly worded. Some audiences identified. Some overview of main points. Message is unclear. 1 or 2 audiences identified. Main points not presented. Message is irrelevant. No audience identified.
Fact base Facts provide effective support. Consistently detailed. Excellent variety of sources. Facts provide substantial support. Detailed. Good variety of sources. Facts provide some support. Lacking details. Some variety of sources. Few facts provided. Lacking details. Limited variety of sources. Few or no facts provided. No details. No variety of sources.
Depth/Analysis Facts consistently linked to message of the brochure - explanations are effective. Critical thinking obvious. Full understanding of topic demonstrated. Facts generally linked to message of the brochure - explanations are effective. Needs additional analysis in some places. Solid understanding of topic demonstrated. Facts not always linked to message of the brochure. Need more analysis and explanation. Developing understanding of topic demonstrated. Facts rarely linked to message of the brochure. Needs more analysis and explanation. Beginning understanding of topic demonstrated. Facts not linked to message of the brochure. Lacks analysis and explanation. No understanding of topic demonstrated.
Conclusion Properly restates message of the brochure. Summarises main points, with no new data. Summarises the audience, with no new data. Restates message of the brochure. Summarises main points, with no new data. Summarises the audience. Restates message of the brochure, poorly worded. Unclear summary of main points. Summarises the audience, poorly worded. Restates message of the brochure, poorly worded. Unclear summary of main points. Summarises only some of the audience. Message of the brochure not restated. No summary of main points. No summary of the audience.
Referencing
In-text citation Demonstrates attention to detail - all aspects of formatting are correct every time. Uses notes to further explain use of source. Demonstrates attention to detail - all aspects of formatting are correct most times. Uses some notes to explain use of sources. Demonstrates developing attention to detail - all aspects of formatting are correct. Demonstrates beginning attention to detail - some aspects of formatting are correct. Demonstrates no attention to detail - formatting is consistently incorrect.
Full citations/Reference list Demonstrates attention to detail - all aspects of formatting are correct every time. Uses notes to further explain use of source. Demonstrates attention to detail - all aspects of formatting are correct most times. Uses some notes to explain use of sources. Demonstrates developing attention to detail - all aspects of formatting are correct. Demonstrates beginning attention to detail - some aspects of formatting are correct. Demonstrates no attention to detail - formatting is consistently incorrect.

Review Suggestions

Student Engagement Did time management allow for proper communication between students and teacher? Did activities allow students to practice critical skills?

Student-centred teaching Did the lesson cater for the needs of all students? Could feedback and assessment have been improved?

Links to next lesson

Internal Links

Create a Publicity Brochure Teacher Resource

Understanding the Activity Types

Understanding the Assessment Types

References

  1. Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. (2012.) The Australian Curriculum (History). http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/Download


External Links


--Beth Kicinski 10:02, 13 June 2012 (EST)
Retrieved from "http://bih.federation.edu.au/index.php/Create_a_Publicity_Brochure_Lesson_Plan"
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