Mining

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This includes operators “that mainly extract naturally occurring mineral solids, such as coal and ores; liquid minerals, such as crude petroleum; and gases, such as natural gas"[1] and those performing preparatory work at the mine site as part of the mining activity - and support services that perform on a contract or fee basis, and exploration.

Mining Lease Application. Federation University Australia Historical Collection (Cat. No. 9692)

Contents

History

Discovery

James William Esmond was the original finder of gold at Clunes in June or July of 1851.[2]


Thomas Dunn co-discovered gold at Golden Point, Ballarat, in 1851.[3]


The Early Years

Both plunger and lift pumps were used from an early date on the Ballarat field. A 40-inch Cornish engine operated a pump at the Great Northwest Company’s claim. The wrought iron beam was imported from England … In the 1860s, hauling was achieved either by flat ropes which were six-inch wide manila or wire up to four-and-a-half inches wide. Rectangular link iron chains were also used. Cages were comparatively simple devices. The Prince of Wales Company had double decker cages.[4]


Serjeant was still agitating publicly against protectionism in 1876 as the water in the Deep Leads rose steadily, threatening the Band and Albion workings and forcing the abandonment of Nos 1 and 3 shafts. This did not deter the directors from donating the patent rights and plans for a ‘self acting pyrite furnace’ to the School of Mines.[5]

Artefacts

Innovations

Legacies

The People

William A. Blaikie was one of a party of six from Geelong who were the first to sign a cooperative mining agreement on 22 September 1851.[6]


H. T. Bond was one of a party of eight from Geelong who signed a cooperative mining agreement on 8 October 1851.[7]


William Brownbill was the discoverer of gold at Brown Hill, Ballarat in 1851.[8]


Thomas Butler was in a party of six from Geelong who signed the first cooperative mining agreement on 22 September 1851.[9]

See also

Operators involved in Mining will have one or a combination of the following activities as the primary activity of their operations:


Coal Mining

Operators involved in Coal Mining will have one or a combination of the following activities as the primary activity of their operations: black coal mining; brown coal mining; lignite mining; and/or peat cutting (except horticultural).


Oil and Gas Extraction

Operators involved in Oil and Gas Extraction will have one or a combination of the following activities as the primary activity of their operations: black coal mining; brown coal mining; lignite mining; and/or peat cutting (except horticultural); natural gas extraction; oil shale mining; and/or petroleum gas extraction.


Metal Ore Mining

Operators involved in Metal Ore Mining will have one or a combination of the following activities as the primary activity of their operations: iron ore dressing or beneficiating; iron ore mining; iron sand mining; aluminium ore mining; bauxite mining; copper ore leaching; copper ore mining; electro won copper production; alluvial gold mining; eluvial gold mining; gold bullion production; gold dredging; gold mining; gold ore roasting and flotation extraction, including metallurgical hydro-extraction; gold washing or sluicing; reworking of mullock heaps or tailings for gold; ilmenite sand mining; leucoxene sand mining; mineral sand mining; monazite sand mining; rutile sand mining; synthetic rutile production; zircon sand mining; nickel ore mining; lead ore mining; silver-lead-zinc ore mining; silver ore mining; zinc ore mining; antimony ore mining; beryllium ore mining; bismuth ore mining; iron pyrite mining; manganese ore mining; molybdenite mining; platinum group metal mining; tantalite mining; tin ore mining; tungsten ore mining; and/or uranium ore mining.


Non-Metallic Mineral Mining and Quarrying

Operators involved in Non-Metallic Mineral Mining and Quarrying have construction material mining as the primary activity of their operations.


Exploration and Other Mining Support Services


References

  1. Dennis Trewin and Brian Pink. Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC) – 2006. Canberra: Australian Bureau of Statistics/Statistics New Zealand, 2006, page 96.
  2. http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~carrick/Ballarat%20a%20to%20b.html accessed 15 March 2013.
  3. http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~carrick/Ballarat%20a%20to%20b.html accessed 15 March 2013.
  4. P L McCarthy. ‘What was it like to be an Underground Operator in Ballarat in the 19th Century.’ 1992 Address to Underground Operator’s Conference, Ballarat, page 3.
  5. P L McCarthy. ‘What was it like to be an Underground Operator in Ballarat in the 19th Century.’ 1992 Address to Underground Operator’s Conference, Ballarat, page 3.
  6. http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~carrick/Ballarat%20a%20to%20b.html accessed 15 March 2013.
  7. http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~carrick/Ballarat%20a%20to%20b.html accessed 15 March 2013.
  8. http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~carrick/Ballarat%20a%20to%20b.html accessed 15 March 2013.
  9. http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~carrick/Ballarat%20a%20to%20b.html accessed 15 March 2013.

Further Reading

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