William Gallie (c1831-1910)

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==Family==
 
==Family==
 
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Married Hannah M. who died in January 1913.<ref>Ballarat Star, 13 January 1913.</ref>
  
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== Obituary ==
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::Mr William Gallie, an old and respected resident of Soldiers Hill, passed away on Saturday at his residence, Brougham street, at the age of 79. The deceased was a native of Dunfermline, [[Scotland]], and arrived in Victoria in 1859. For eight years prior to that he was in America, where he worked as an engineer and wheelwright. He was foreman of the Phoenix Foundry about 40 years ago, and was subsequently engaged with Mr John Gibb, and afterwards with Mr J. Smith, both agricultural implement makers. He was an exceedingly clever machinist, and invented numerous ingenious labor saving appliances for machinery, but never took the trouble to patent his inventions. So capably was he that he was frequently consulted on matters pretaining to machinery by some of the ablest engineers in Ballarat. As far back as 1862 he made a brick-making machine, which he exhibited about that time at the Kyneton Show. About that period he also invented a potato digger and a chaff bagger Over 47 years ago he made for his wife a sewing machine, and Mrs Gallie, who survives her husband, still has the machine at her home in Brougham street. He gained many prizes at the Ballarat Agricultural Show for machines he invented, and had he had, the foresight to have  protected his interests by, patenting his  inventions his would have been a well known name throughout Australia, in the world of mechanics. Mr Wallace Gallie, the only son of deceased, who died about 13 years ago, inherited his father’s taste for mechanics and engineering, and at the time of his death was an electrician of repute in Sydney. The funeral took place at the New Cemetery yesterday. The Rev. A. H. Moore read tlie service at the house and at the graveside. Messrs H. Knott, W. Knott, J. Scatcherd, and M Kennedy acted as Coffin-bearers, and the pall-bearers were Messrs E. Beaton, W. Bowden, J. Johnston, J. D. Meldrum, J. Downing, J. Boyson, Sutherland, S. E. Tucker, and T. Sim. Messrs Jordan and Tippett con ducted the funeral.<ref>Ballarat Star, 25 January 1912.</ref>
  
 
==See also==
 
==See also==

Latest revision as of 09:55, 30 March 2018

Contents

History

Legacy

Family

Married Hannah M. who died in January 1913.[1]


Obituary

Mr William Gallie, an old and respected resident of Soldiers Hill, passed away on Saturday at his residence, Brougham street, at the age of 79. The deceased was a native of Dunfermline, Scotland, and arrived in Victoria in 1859. For eight years prior to that he was in America, where he worked as an engineer and wheelwright. He was foreman of the Phoenix Foundry about 40 years ago, and was subsequently engaged with Mr John Gibb, and afterwards with Mr J. Smith, both agricultural implement makers. He was an exceedingly clever machinist, and invented numerous ingenious labor saving appliances for machinery, but never took the trouble to patent his inventions. So capably was he that he was frequently consulted on matters pretaining to machinery by some of the ablest engineers in Ballarat. As far back as 1862 he made a brick-making machine, which he exhibited about that time at the Kyneton Show. About that period he also invented a potato digger and a chaff bagger Over 47 years ago he made for his wife a sewing machine, and Mrs Gallie, who survives her husband, still has the machine at her home in Brougham street. He gained many prizes at the Ballarat Agricultural Show for machines he invented, and had he had, the foresight to have protected his interests by, patenting his inventions his would have been a well known name throughout Australia, in the world of mechanics. Mr Wallace Gallie, the only son of deceased, who died about 13 years ago, inherited his father’s taste for mechanics and engineering, and at the time of his death was an electrician of repute in Sydney. The funeral took place at the New Cemetery yesterday. The Rev. A. H. Moore read tlie service at the house and at the graveside. Messrs H. Knott, W. Knott, J. Scatcherd, and M Kennedy acted as Coffin-bearers, and the pall-bearers were Messrs E. Beaton, W. Bowden, J. Johnston, J. D. Meldrum, J. Downing, J. Boyson, Sutherland, S. E. Tucker, and T. Sim. Messrs Jordan and Tippett con ducted the funeral.[2]

See also

Phoenix Foundry


Notes


References

  1. Ballarat Star, 13 January 1913.
  2. Ballarat Star, 25 January 1912.


Further Reading

External links


--Beth Kicinski 09:27, 29 May 2017 (AEST)

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