Albion Imperial Hotel

From Ballarat and District Industrial Heritage Project
Jump to: navigation, search
For other Albion Hotels, see Albion Hotel.

The Albion Imperial Hotel was a hotel in Ballarat, Victoria, <1883>.

Contents

Background

  • In 1883 An accident of rather a novel character occurred yesterday afternoon. Whilst a party of gentlemen were playing a game of hand-ball at Mr Hardy's ball court in Armstrong street, Mr James Dwyer, landlord of the Albion Imperial hotel, tossed a ball to his opponent, who returned it with such rapidity that Mr Dwyer could not turn his head in the opposite direction until the ball caught him on the jaw, within half, an inch of the.eye. Fortunately the eye was not hurt, but so near did the ball come to that useful organ that it is fortunate that it was not destroyed[1]

History

Site

The Albion Imperial Hotel was on the west side of Armstrong Street, between Sturt Street and Dana Street.[2] It was later named the National Hotel, and then the Grand National Hotel.[2] Hargreaves identified the site in 1943 as being 28 Armstrong Street, which was then Andrews' Coffee Palace.[2] This is now the site of the Central Square Shopping Centre.

Innovations

Community Involvement

  • SIR,—I beg through your columns to return thanks to the members of the Ballarat Imperial and Albion Imperial Football Clubs for their services in playing a match on the 14th inst., on the Western-Oval for the benefit of me and my six orphans, which resulted In the sum of £l4 17s, for our relief, and also to Mr James Dwyer, Albion Imperial hotel; Armstrong street, for the great interest he has taken on our behalf. Ellen Walsh, widow of the late John Walsh.: Redan, Ballarat, 19th July, 1883[3]

Works Produced

Workplace Relations

The People

Legacies

See also

Notes

  • Whilst a party of gentlemen were playing a game of hand-ball at Mr Hardy's ball court in Armstrong street, Mr James Dwyer, landlord of the Albion Imperial hotel, tossed a ball to his opponent, who returned it with such rapidity that Mr Dwyer could not turn his head in the opposite direction until the ball caught him on the jaw, within half an inch of the eye. Fortunately the eye was not hurt, but so near did the ball come to that useful organ that it is fortunate that it was not destroyed.[4]

References

  1. The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 - 1924) Wed 31 Jan 1883 https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/202703261?
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 Hargreaves, John. Ballarat Hotels Past and Present, pg. 17, 1943, Ballarat
  3. The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 - 1924) Fri 20 Jul 1883 https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/202508693?
  4. The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 - 1924) Wed 31 Jan 1883 https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/202703261?


Further Reading

External Links


--Mjeffs 12:50, 2 April 2019 (AEDT)

Personal tools