Boomerangs

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Contents

History

Return Boomerangs were mainly used in games which tested the skill of the thrower. They were also used in hunting when they were thrown low to give the impression of a swooping hawk and scare water birds into prepared nets. [1]

Innovations

"A unique Australian invention, the boomerang, had many uses and purposes. The genius and aerodynamics of the boomerang are one of humanity's greatest inventions. The boomerang is known as an aerofoil, a surface which is designed to lift by making use of air current. A boomerang has the profile of a bird's wing with the upper surface being greater that the one underneath. This characteristic produces a difference in pressure which generates lift when the boomerang is thrown through the air." [2]

Legacies

Three return type boomerangs recovered from a South Australian peat quarry date to 10,000 years ago, providing evidence that the Aboriginal boomerang is the oldest in the world. [3]

Victorian Aboriginal Heritage Register

Aboriginal objects and heritage places are irreplaceable, non-renewable resources and can include traditional and spiritual sites of significance. The Victorian Aboriginal Heritage Register (VAHR) was established by the Aboriginal Heritage Act 2006 is an important administrative tool and holds the details of all known Aboriginal cultural heritage places and objects within Victoria, including their location and a detailed description. Places or objects are recorded by cultural heritage advisors on forms which are approved under the Act. The Victorian Aboriginal Heritage Register is not a publicly accessible register because it contains culturally sensitive information. Registered Aboriginal Parties (RAPs) play a key role in the protection and management of Aboriginal cultural heritage. The Register holds information of each Registered Aboriginal party, their area of responsibility and contact details. [4]

The Aboriginal Heritage Act 2006 requires that the discovery of Aboriginal cultural heritage places or objects on any public or private land in Victoria be reported to Aboriginal Affairs Victoria - see http://www.dpcd.vic.gov.au/indigenous/aboriginal-cultural-heritage/information-for-landowners/reporting-a-possible-aboriginal-place-or-object

If you are the custodian of a Victorian Aboriginal object or place you are encouraged to document it on the Victorian Aboriginal Heritage Register by contacting Aboriginal Affairs Victoria to arrange to complete the form located at http://www.dpcd.vic.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0003/35607/Victroian_Aboriginal_Heritage_Register_Form_Sept_2008.pdf.

How to care for and register Aboriginal objects and heritage places is further explained via an 11 minute video available at http://cv.vic.gov.au/stories/the-aboriginal-object-collection-at-dunkeld-museum/


Recommended Reading

References

  1. Sibtain, Nancy (Ed) Aboriginal Australia, Australian Gallery Directors Council Ltd, Sydney, New South Wales, p98.
  2. http://australia.gov.au/about-australia/australian-story/austn-inventions
  3. Sibtain, Nancy (Ed) Aboriginal Australia, Australian Gallery Directors Council Ltd, Sydney, New South Wales, p98.
  4. http://www.dpcd.vic.gov.au/indigenous/aboriginal-cultural-heritage/Victorian-aboriginal-heritage-register


Further Reading

Sibtain, Nancy (Ed) Aboriginal Australia, Australian Gallery Directors Council Ltd, Sydney, New South Wales.

External Links

http://www.dpcd.vic.gov.au/indigenous/aboriginal-cultural-heritage/aboriginal-heritage-act-2006

http://www.dpcd.vic.gov.au/indigenous/aboriginal-cultural-heritage/aboriginal-heritage-act-2006/guides-and-forms

http://www.dpcd.vic.gov.au/indigenous/aboriginal-heritage-council/registered-aboriginal-parties



--C.K.Gervasoni 14:31, 14 August 2012 (EST)

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