Buninyong Butter Factory

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The Buninyong Butter Factory was formed in 1892 with a capital of 5,000 pounds in 10 shares. In 1918 it was reduced to 3,500 pounds in seven shares.[1]


Contents

Background

History

Buninyong Butter Factory – formed in 1892.[2]

OPENING OF THE BUNINYONG BUTTER FACTORY.
SPEECH BY MR. D. M. DAVIES, M.L.A.
‘BALLARAT, Wednesday.
A butter factory was started at Buninyong to-day, in the presence of a large gathering. The machinery is on the scale of the Government dairy, worked under Mr. Wilson, the Government dairy expert. The churn is a 6cwt. concussion side pan, and the separator is capable of putting through milk at the rate of 150 gallons per hour. The plant is a very complete one, and those present to-day had the pleasure of witnessing a first-class quantity of butter being turned out. The company has been registered in 6,000 shares of 10s. each, and the directors are Messrs, D. Kerr (chairman), G. Eason, H. Vernon, J. Forrest, and J. Bowers.
Mr. Kerr, when proposing the toast of “The Parliament,” said that their presence that day was due to Parliament, as it had given a bonus to industries for the exportation of butter. Parliament endeavoured to do its best to foster the industries of the colony, and if they gave Parliament sufficient time the country would return to its usual prosperity.
Mr. D. M. Davies, M.L.A., in responding, said that he had gone to Melbourne last night to record his vote in Parliament in reference to the no-confidence motion proposed by Sir Bryan O’Loghlen, but unfortunately he was 10 minutes late, and, therefore, had not the opportunity of recording his vote. He intended to support the Government. As it happened the result was not disastrous to the country, and he was pleased to note that the Opposition were defeated. He hoped that the present Government, for the credit of the colony, would bring those people to book who had had charge of bogus financial institutions. It was lamentable to think that men who believed that they had retired found themselves on the verge of poverty. Many persons had invested their money in companies which, unfortunately, had turned out sham institutions, believing that the directors were saintly, church-going people. They had represented themselves as such, but it was greatly to be regretted that their actions were very imperfect. He, however, earnestly hoped that the directors of the bogus companies would be prosecuted at once. Those directors had proved themselves worse than the Kelly gang. (Applause.)
During the opening celebration a presentation was made to the secretary, Mr. T. J. Daniel, in recognition of the work he had done in starting the company.’
[3]
'Shareholders in the Buninyong Butter Factory Company mutually congratulated themselves yesterday on having come through an abnormal season with the loss of only £30/10/10. During the half-year the quantity of cream supplied to the factory was 182,453lb, as against 532,256lb in the preceding term, representing a diminution of 44 1/3 per cent. Dairy herds, the chairman (Mr H. J. Vernon) pointed out, had been proportionately reduced in the Western district; but the pastures were so good that the present season gave promise of a good milk supply. Mr Vernon also touched on the advisability of rearing all the young female stock possible, with a view to replenishing the dairy herds. Passing on to the Price of Foods Board, he declared it had not only done no good, but had done a lot of harm in hampering the industry in a way that merited the general condemnation of dairymen. Because of it the consumer had paid a higher price for his butter than he should have done, and the producer had been obliged to turn his cows prematurely dry.' [4]


Site

Innovations

Community Involvement

Works Produced

Workplace Relations

The People

The secretary at one time was John Porter.[5]


Mr William Bray – formerly a director of the Buninyong Butter Factory – died aged 85, Saturday 21 July 1917, at Golden Square. [6]


H. J. Vernon


Legacies

See also

Recommended Reading

References

  1. The Argus, 21 August 1925.
  2. The Ballarat Courier (Vic. : 1914 – 1918) Friday 22 February 1918, page 4.
  3. The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), Thursday 24 November 1892, page 6. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8485459
  4. The Ballarat Courier (Vic. : 1914 – 1918) Saturday 18 September 1915, page 2.
  5. Buninyong & District Historical Society Inc. Newsletter, October 2002.
  6. The Ballarat Courier (Vic. : 1914 – 1918) Monday 23 July 1917, page 1.


Further Reading

External Links


--C.K.Gervasoni 16:41, 16 June 2011 (EST)

--Beth Kicinski 13:30, 20 July 2012 (EST)

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