Cadets

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Cadets

Ballarat Junior Techncial School Air Cadets No 24 Flight of the Air Training Corps, 1955. Ballarat School of Mines Students' Magazine, 1955
Members of the Ballarat Junior Techncial School Air Cadets No 24 Flight of the Air Training Corps ANZAC Day Guard of Honour, 1955. Ballarat School of Mines Students' Magazine, 1955
Ballarat Junior Techncial School Air Cadets No 24 Flight of the Air Training Corps, 1957. Ballarat School of Mines Students' Magazine, 1957

Contents

Australian Air Training Corps (AATC)

In February 1941, the War Cabinet approved the formation of a cadet corps (known as the Air Training Corps or ATC) as part of the RAAF Reserve. This scheme provided pre-entry training for air and ground crews to the RAAF during World War 2. Most of ATC’s instructors were unpaid volunteers, many of whom had been pilots in WWI. By 31 October 1943, 12,000 cadets were training. Although this number declined to 7,557 when the Pacific War ended in August 1945, by then just under 12,000 former members had gone on to enlist in the wartime RAAF.[1]

Between 1946-1948 the ATC cadets were demobilised and scaled down for post- war years with the aims changed to a peacetime role. Cadets were not obliged to enlist in the RAAF, but preference was given to those who did.[2] The broad aim of the Australian Air Force Cadets was to better equip young people for community life by fostering initiative, leadership, discipline and loyalty through a training program designed to stimulate an interest in the Royal Australian Air Force reflecting the following objectives:

  • To give Cadets a foundation of Air Force knowledge and discipline;
  • To develop the qualities of leadership, initiative and self-reliance;
  • To develop good character and good citizenship in the widest sense;
  • To develop an interest in the Royal Australian Air Force and aviation generally;
  • To instill a knowledge of the history of aviation; and
  • To encourage Cadets to continue an active interest in aviation into their adult life.[3]

on 26 August 1975 the ATC was disbanded by the Whitlam Labour Government. The following year, on 27 May 1976 the Air Training Corps raised and re-formed by Fraser Coalition Government, with the first girls admitted in 1882. In 2001 the organisation was named the Australian Air Force Cadets (AAFC)[4]

The broad aim of the Australian Air Force Cadets is to better equip young people for community life by fostering initiative, leadership, discipline and loyalty through a training program designed to stimulate an interest in the Royal Australian Air Force. The training program is structured to reflect the following objectives:

To give Cadets a foundation of Air Force knowledge and discipline; To develop the qualities of leadership, initiative and self-reliance; To develop good character and good citizenship in the widest sense; To develop an interest in the Royal Australian Air Force and aviation generally; To instill a knowledge of the history of aviation; and To encourage Cadets to continue an active interest in aviation into their adult life.[5]

In May 1954 The Air Training Cadets (aka Air Cadets or The Flight) were established at the Ballarat Junior Technical School, a division of the Ballarat School of Mines. Camps were held at the R.A.A.F. Station at Laverton, and rifle shoots at Williamstown. In 1955 there were 60 cadets in the Flight, 20 being second year cadets and 40 being 1st year cadets.[6] By 1957 hey were known as the ATC 24 Flight.[7]

In 1956, No. 24 Junior Technical Flight School took part in the "Battle of Britian" commemoration services when Herbert J. Trevenen inspected the flight and addressed the Ballarat School of Mines on the significance of the occasion.[8] Between March 1943 and February 1945, Trevenen flew over 40 sorties during World War two.

Also See

Ballarat School of Mines

World War One

World War Two

External Sites

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_Air_Force_Cadets


References

  1. http://www.aafc.org.au/who-we-are/history/, accessed 30 March 2021.
  2. http://www.aafc.org.au/who-we-are/history/, accessed 30 March 2021.
  3. http://www.aafc.org.au/who-we-are/vision/, accessed 30 March 2021.
  4. http://www.aafc.org.au/who-we-are/history/, accessed 30 March 2021.
  5. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_Air_Force_Cadets, accessed 30 March 2021.
  6. Ballarat School of Mines Students' Magazine 1955.
  7. Ballarat School of Mines Students' Magazine 1957.
  8. Ballarat The School of Mines and Industries Students' Magazine, 1956. p. 52
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