Classifying the Entries

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See also: Understanding how to classify new entries

See also: Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC)


Several models exist for classification of industries into industrial sectors – by product, size, environmental impact and other methods. In order to provide a common means of classification for all contributors to the Ballarat and District Industrial Heritage Project, the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC) has been adopted. This document provides detailed support for determining into which category an industry should be placed:


“…industries are formed by grouping business units that are mainly engaged in undertaking similar economic activities. Individual business units may use structures for their taxation, management, financing, production and employment functions which differ from the structures used for the same purposes by other business units (p. 18)… The basic method for classifying units to categories in the ANZSIC is to classify each unit according to its predominant activity (p. 21)… As recommended by the ISIC, the ABS and Statistics NZ use the concept of Value Added (refer to the Australian System of National Accounts: Concepts, Sources and Methods (Cat. No. 5216.0) for the definition of Value Added) to determine the predominant activity of a unit undertaking multiple activities, that is, the activity with the highest value added is the predominant activity (p. 21)… It is common for businesses to change their mix of activities over time such that the predominant activity of a unit can be affected. This can occur for many reasons, including changes in product profitability, seasonal price changes, growth opportunities, the release of new products or business restructuring….Temporary fluctuations, based on minor shifts in activity, should not be reflected in the unit’s industry classification…Both the ABS and Statistics NZ apply ISIC recommended resistance factors to prevent units changing industry on the basis of temporary activity shifts. This rule states that the change to a unit’s activity must be in place for a minimum of two years before a change in the ANZSIC can be applied (p. 24).”[1]


Utilising this resource will minimise duplication of data and ensure that the wiki will provide the data in a manner deemed suitable for current standards of research.


To locate a new entry, start with the Contents page and follow the links until you find the appropriate page.


External Links

Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC)

Australian System of National Accounts: Concepts, Sources and Methods

References

  1. Trewin, Dennis and Brian Pink. (2006). Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC) – 2006. Canberra: Australian Bureau of Statistics/Statistics New Zealand.




--Beth Kicinski 14:47, 20 July 2012 (EST)

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