Early steam engines at Ballarat

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Contents

History

There was only one steam-engine at the end of 1852 or beginning of 1853 on Ballarat.[1]

In 1852 there were no steam-engines in Ballarat. The first was in 1853—Campbell's. Ours was the second. Campbell was only a puddler, not a crusher. It is quite impossible there could have been three or four steam-engines in use in Ballarat without my knowing it—even within three or four miles.[2]

STEAM ENGINE FOR BALLARAT.-The machine lately purchased by a Geelong Company is nearly complete, and will be first essayed on Golden Point. If the principle be a correct one the steam power is ample, and the speculation wise. Hundreds of tons of earth have been thrown aside as useless, which by approved appliances would yield an ample return. [3]

STEAM ENGINE FOR BALLARAT.— The six-horse power steam engine and apparatus attached, to which we have already alluded, was to be seen yesterday, in full operation in this town. The appurtenances to the steel engine, adapted to the washing of gold, consist of a conical elongated tank, lined with iron sheeting, traversed in length by a large spindle, to which are welded a number of transverse iron arms, the rotatory motion of which is to effect the same result as puddling. The tank, which is fixed on a substantial frame work, will hold from eighty to ninety buckets of earth, and is supplied with a constant stream of water from a pump worked by a simultaneous action with the large spindle. Attached to the tank by a crank is a large cradle, the hopper is made of perforated galvanised iron, and the sliding bottom of the cradle is subdivided into a number of deep compartments. The whole is worked by a drum and straps. The chief feature in the machine is the "puddling department;" if that prove efficacious, the rest is a matter of mere de- tail. It is the boldest stroke yet attempted, and, were it only for the enterprise of our townsmen, we cordially wish it every success. The engine unchristened yet, is ready, and will be journey- ing to its destination this day. Golden Point will be shaken to its center — its hillocks raised, and its buried treasures brought to light by steam. Who, after this, will twit the Old Chums with supineness?[4]

Artefacts

Innovations

The People

William Frederick Osborne

William Beauclerc Otway


Legacies

See also

Black Hill Chronology


Notes


References

  1. Evidence given by William Crossley at Stevens' patent rotating stamper head – court challenge LAW REPORT. (1860, May 31). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), p. 6. Retrieved October 10, 2015, from [1]
  2. Evidence given by William Frederick Osborne at Stevens' patent rotating stamper head – court challenge LAW REPORT. (1860, May 31). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), p. 6. Retrieved October 10, 2015, from [2]
  3. RETURN OF BALLARAT ESCORT TO GEELONG, Feb. 22nd. (1853, February 23). Geelong Advertiser and Intelligencer (Vic. : 1851 - 1856), p. 2 (DAILY.). Retrieved March 30, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article94360439
  4. DAISY HILL. (1853, February 26). Geelong Advertiser and Intelligencer (Vic. : 1851 - 1856), p. 2 (DAILY.). Retrieved March 30, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article94359411


Further Reading

External Links


--Neil Huybregts 17:12, 16 October 2015 (AEDT)

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