Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company

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Advertisement for what was essentially the foundation meeting for the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company.[1]

William Beauclerc Otway set up and operated the first steam-powered quartz-crushing mill in Ballarat in 1854-55.[Notes 1] In 1859-60 he travelled to Tasmania to manage the establishment of a gold mine near Fingal for the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company.

Contents

Background

History

According to Robert Worley, who went on to become a director of the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing Company, a meeting was held on or about 1 July 1859 "by a few zealous friends, who thought that measures ought to be adopted by the middle classes to avail themselves of the advantages presented by the gold discoveries at Fingal; few, however, attended, and another meeting was held..."[1] This second meeting is likely to be the one held on 8 July 1859 "for the purpose of forming a Provisional Committee and transacting other business connected with the Company."[2] Worley presented a prospectus to the meeting which proposed £5 shares, which he contrasted with the £10 and even £100 shares he asserted were required by other companies forming at the time, but the feeling of the meeting was that insufficient notice had been provided, and the meeting adjourned to more widely publicise the venture, and to allow the details of the prospectus to be made public.[3] According to Worley, "a committee was appointed to re-consider, and, if possible, to improve the propositions previously adopted; since that meeting the Committee had met frequently and had agreed on the propositions which had been submitted to the public...""[1]

The subsequent meeting was advertised for at least four days[4] and received a resoundingly supportive editorial in The Hobart Town Daily Mercury the day before it was held.[5] As noted in the editorial, the advertisement stated the company was proposed "for the purpose of employing Machinery for Quartz Crushing or Alluvial Sinking in any part of Tasmania where reasonable prospects offer to repay the Company for their outlay."[4][5]

The editorial made much of the fact that gold-seeking companies had been set up by investors in the north of Tasmania, but little was being done by Hobartians:

Nearly all the energy now being displayed has been put forth by our brethren on the northern side of the Island. Whilst the Southern Capitalists are holding meetings and talking about the wisdom of forming Companies, our northern friends have shot a long way ahead. They have already formed a Company, engaged a scientific Manager from Victoria, ordered machinery, and, in a month or two, will be carrying their weekly return to the credit side of their ledger; whilst here, in the Capital of the Colony, nothing whatever has been done![5]

This sentiment is likely to have been a factor in the choice of name for the company. In fact, once the company was properly formed, advertisements were placed offering a £100 reward "for the discovery... of a Payable Quartz Reef... within 40 miles of Hobart Town."[6] As the company's stated purpose makes clear, however, they were realistically prepared to set to work "in any part of Tasmania".

The meeting re-convened on 15 July at the Bird in Hand Hotel in Argyle Street, which became their usual venue, with David Lewis, the mayor of Hobart Town, in the chair and "numerous... citizens and others" present. Worley outlined the background to the proposal and explained that the company would be seeking limited liability status under upcoming legislation. He then "proceeded to explain the other items in the prospectus, reading the document at length, and leaving it to the meeting to approve of or modify any portion, or the whole; he concluded by moving that the proposals laid before the meeting be approved of." The prospectus was adopted without modification, but not before John Davies, one of the committee, emphasised the importance of appointing "a Field Officer, or General Manager". Davies had recently returned from Melbourne in the company (accidentally or otherwise) of Charles Nevins, with whom he wholeheartedly agreed regarding the need for "practical and experienced men", even going so far as to assert that:

...with regard to the appointment of Mr. Gould, the Government Geologist, his theoretical knowledge was not worth a straw in Tasmania or Victoria, and it was a well-authenticated fact amongst scientific men that theoretical knowledge with respect to these colonies was altogether valueless, when put in competition, to use Mr. Nevins' own words, with the experience of the pick and shovel. (Cheers.)

At the conclusion of the meeting "upwards of 400 shares were taken, and the deposit paid."[1]

It is unlikely Davies was touting for Niven to become the manager. Nivens had arrived in Tasmania from Victoria over a fortnight earlier and travelled to Fingal "to examine and report upon the quartz reefs of the district".[7] He became manager of the Launceston Quartz Crushing Company at a meeting on 8 July, one week before the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company meeting.[8][9]

For ten days following the meeting, advertisements were placed in The Hobart Town Daily Mercury detailing the company's prospectus.[10] By early August, 2,600 shares had been applied for "and the Fees Paid",[11] but if so, it is unclear why the time for payment of the first deposits needed to be extended.[12]

Toward the end of July, "a gentleman named Milliken having acquired a competency by gold digging in Victoria... visited this Colony previous to his departure to Britain."[13] Milliken met with the provisional committee of the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing Company. His "advice and suggestions were extremely valuable, so much so, indeed, as to induce the Committee to assume the responsibility of despatching accredited agents to Fingal in Company with that gentleman to select and put in a claim for quartz reefs on behalf of the Company."[14] There is no further mention of Milliken in the Tasmanian newspapers. [15]

It is unclear whether Milliken was the "gentleman... despatched to prospect the country near Fingal for a new reef" in early August.[16] It is unlikely that the gentleman was William Beauclerc Otway. Otway arrived in Tasmania from Victoria on 23 July,[17] but his employment by the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing Company is not certain until 7 September, when the company "entered into a temporary engagement with Dr. Otway, the Metallurgist, who will at once proceed to Fingal to test the several claims of the Company."[18] Otway's activities between 23 July and 7 September – a trip to Fingal[19] and a public lecture in Hobart[20] – do not seem connected with the company.

The meeting to elect the company directors was advertised for a week commencing 17 August. 68 people nominated for the 15 positions available.[21] The Hobart Town Daily Mercury ran two editorials during that time calling for the choice of directors to be based on practical ability and business sense rather than wealth:

If the Company is to be, as it was originally intended to be, a Tradesmen's Company, the Directors should be selected from amongst that class; they should be men in whom the shareholders have confidence; men whose sympathies are in harmony with their own. Because a man is wealthy that is no reason why he should be a thoroughly practical man of business. It is the assistance of this latter class which must be secured if it is wished that the Company should be prosperous, and we shall be grievously disappointed, therefore, should we find that the advantage of having such men has been sacrificed either to private friendship or to wealth.[22]
We do not want men of wealth in the Directory so much as men of untiring energy, and these should be selected, as far as practicable, from the class to which a large majority of the proprietors belong.[23]

The meeting was held on 24 August. Again, the mayor chaired, and the meeting began with the reading and acceptance of the provisional committee's report, a vote of thanks to the provisional committee, and the appointment of scrutineers. The majority of the newspaper report was taken up with a discussion of the voting process. The voting then took place, followed by eight hours of vote counting, the results being announced by the mayor at half past midnight. Some notable results are:

  • The mayor, David Lewis, had the most number of votes. At 626 votes, he was well ahead of the second-place getter, John Symons, with 352 votes. Although Lewis was [@likely to be] wealthy, this is nevertheless consistent with the urgings of The Hobart Town Daily Mercury as Lewis was a [@well-respected] merchant, the native-born son of Richard Lewis, also a merchant.
  • Of the nine members[3][4] of the provisional committee, John Dickenson, Alexander Gellie and Frederick Paterson were not elected. Dickenson and Paterson do not appear in the newspapers again, at least, not in relation to the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company. Gellie was appointed one of the liquidators when the company was dissolved less than a year later.
  • Christopher Basstian, the proprietor of the Bird in Hand Hotel, was elected a director, but his role during the short life of the company seems to be limited to the provision of the meeting venue.

DIRECTORS:—
D. Lewis ... ... ... ... 626
J. Symons ... ... ... 352
@@
J. Doughty ... ... ... 329
C. O. Atkins . ... ... 319
R.T.Edwards ... ... 314
J. M. Wilson ... ... 312
J. C. Hall .... ... ... 309
@@
W. Hebblewhite 301
@@
R. Worley .. ... ... 299
@@
J. Davies .. ... ... 292
@@
G. Morgan .... ... 259
@@
C. Basstian ... ... 258
G. Rolwegan ... 258
J. E. Risby ... ... 222

The next day, The Hobart Town Daily Mercury announced:

The vessel has been built and launched.[24]

Over the following weeks notices appear regarding the appointment of a solicitor and secretary,[25][26][27] the sale of unappropriated shares,[28][29] and the requisitioning of a cart and horse.[30] The company also ran an announcement offering a "£100 REWARD... for the discovery, within three months from this date, of a Payable Quartz Reef, available for the use of the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company (limited), either on Crown land or on land leased from the Crown, within 40 miles of Hobart Town."[6] The offer ran for over six weeks.

In the midst of this bustle, Otway delivered a public lecture at the Hobart Town Mechanics' Institute on 2 September[20] to an "intelligent but not numerous audience".[31] The advertising for the lecture does not connect Otway with the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company, and a one-shilling fee was charged for attendance, an unlikely arrangement had there been a connection, as the company would have been keen to maximise attendance to promote their venture. Perhaps someone from the company attended the lecture; on 7 September it was announced the company had engaged Otway, whose brief was to test the claims apparently already pegged out by the company. "For this purpose, Clayton and Shuttleworth's portable testing machine, with a battery of three stampers, will be sent for immediately, and it is expected that the return from the Quartz tested will nearly cover the expense thus incurred... the Directors are sanguine that their machinery will be procured and vigorously at work before Christmas. We are glad to find that the Directors are thus actively engaged in the important duties delegated to them; and we would strongly advise those who wish to have a finger in the golden pie so soon to be opened in Tasmania to avail themselves of the present opportunity and secure a few shares in this popular Company."[18]

Two weeks later:

The shareholders will be glad to learn that the machinery for testing the various reefs will in all probability arrive from Victoria by the next vessel and will be immediately forwarded to Fingal. Dr. OTWAY is still on the Gold Fields examining the reefs and collecting every information upon the subject so that when the machinery arrives there will not be a moment's delay in commencing practical operations. It is satisfactory to know that the Directors are acting with so much energy and promptitude. Before the spring is far advanced there will we feel convinced be considerable competition, and it is wise on their part, therefore, to make their claim, under the direction of Dr. OTWAY, without any delay.[32]

Chronology

1859

July

July 8 Quartz Crushing Company. —The Secretary of the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing Company has convened a meeting to be held at the mart of Messrs. Worley and Frodsham this afternoon at 3 o'clock prompt, for the purpose of forming a Provisional Committee and transacting other business connected with the Company.[2]

July 9 SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING COMPANY. A Public Meeting was held at the Mart of Messrs Worley and Frodsham yesterday afternoon for the purpose of forming a Provisional Committee and transacting other business. Mr. Morgan was appointed chairman. The chairman having read the circular convening the meeting, said he had heard with immense pleasure that a Company had been formed here instead of waiting for the inhabitants of Launceston to initiate. He believed the subject to be of the very greatest interest to the Colony and that the formation of such a Company would also greatly benefit themselves. Mr. Worley having briefly referred to the preliminary meeting previously holden would now lay before the meeting the draft of a Prospectus of the Company, under the above title, the basis, and salient points of which he said demanded their most serious and earnest attention. There was, he understood, a Company about to be formed here, the shares in which were £100 and another in which the Shares were reduced to £10. But it appeared that the bulk of the citizens were in favor of £5 shares which was proposed to be the amount per share in this Company. Mr. Worley then read the Prospectus explaining the principles upon which it was framed. The prospectus proposed that the capital should consist of £20,000 in 4,000 shares of £5 each, with a fee of 1s. per share to meet preliminary expenses, with a deposit of 2s. 6d. per share; the sum of 7s. 6d. to be paid within 30 days and a bill at three months given for 10s. By this means this would give the Company £4,000 to commence operations, but it was proposed that should a further call be found desirable a call of 10s. per share be made at intervals of not less than 60 days. Having detailed the manner of voting, providing for votes by proxies, it was proposed that a directory of 15 members be appointed in when the appointment of the officers should vest. Having explained the principal heads of the prospectus, and invited the opinion of the meeting upon them, Mr. Worley moved the adoption of the prospectus. Mr. John Symons seconded the motion. Mr. Hebblewhite was aware that the subject to consider which they had met was one of very great importance, and one in which many influential gentlemen were, to his knowledge, deeply interested. But as he did not think that parties had had sufficient notice, he would move as an amendment, that the meeting do adjourn, that notice might be more publicly given. Mr. Gellie seconded the amendment. He thought the question was one of very great importance, and he had no doubt that many parties, who were not aware that this meeting would be holden, would have been present had they received notice. Mr. Davies would support the amendment. He should, had not Mr. Hebblewhite's motion been brought forward, have moved an adjournment, in order that the prospectus might be constructed so as to show on the face of it the exact objects for which the Company was to be formed, that parties to whom the prospectus was submitted might at once see the objects the promoters had in view, and he would then do his best to assist them. Mr. Davies afterwards suggested that a Committee be appointed to draw up a prospectus, and to submit the same to a general meeting. Mr. Sandys moved that it is desirable that a Quartz-crushing Company be formed, and that a Committee, consisting of Messrs. Hebblewhite, Dickenson, Worley, Morgan, Gellie, Symons, Patterson, Davies, and J. Hall, do draw up a prospectus, to be submitted to a general meeting on Friday next. Mr. Hall, senior, seconded the motion, which was carried. Mr. Worley was appointed Convener, and after a vote of thanks to the Chair, the meeting, which was well attended, adjourned.[3]

July 13-16 Proposal to establish a QUARTZ CRUSHING & MINING COMPANY, Under the following title— THE SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING & MINING COMPANY, FOR the purpose of employing Machinery for Quartz Crushing or Alluvial Sinking in any part of Tasmania where reasonable prospects offer to repay the Company for their outlay. The accounts received from many individuals, whose testimony cannot be doubted, confirm most fully statements which have been made repeatedly as to the highly auriferous character of Fingal, and other places, which justify immediate action, with the view of turning to account such invaluable treasures. Individual efforts, while applicable to alluvial diggings, which usually require but moderate means to effect important results, appear to be totally inadequate for carrying on with any prospect of success the more elaborate and expensive works of Quartz Crushing and Mining Operations upon a large scale. The necessity therefore arises for establishing a Company with sufficient capital in order that powerful Machinery may be purchased and applied to works of magnitude and difficulty beyond the scope of mere manual labour. By the instrumentality of a well-organized Company the means can be easily secured, the proprietary protected, and a reasonable assurance of success presented to reward enterprise aided by discretion. The promoters recommend to public consideration the following suggestions as a basis upon which a popular and soundly constituted Company should be formed.
Title-The Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company.
Capital-£20,000, in 4,000 Shares of £5 each.
Limited Liability.
Fee-One Shilling per Share to meet preliminary expenses.
Deposit-2s. 6d. per Share upon allotment.
7s. 6d. cash within 30 days.
10s 0d Promissory Note 3 months.
£1 0s. 0d.
Future calls not to exceed 10s per Share at intervals of not less than 60 days.
SCALE OF VOTING.
2 Shares. 1 Vote
5 do .............. 2 do
10 do .............. 3 do
20 do .............. 4 do
30 do .............. 5 do
40 do .............. 6 do
55 do .............. 7 do
70 do .............. 8 do
85 do .............. 9 do
100 do ..............10 do
No Shareholder to have more than 10 votes whatever number of Shares he may hold. Voting by proxy allowed.
The Directory to consist of 15 members.
Five to be the quorum.
Qualification not loss than 5 Shares. When half the number of Shares are disposed of a meeting of Shareholders to be called, and a Directory to be appointed. The appointment of the Company's Officers to be vested in the Directory.
(Signed)
John Davies
John Dickenson
Alexander Gellie
J. C. Hall
William Hebblewhite
George Morgan
F. Paterson
John Symons
Robert Worley
Hobart Town,
July 12th 1859.
P.S.-A Public Meeting will be held at Basstian's, on Friday the 15th instant. The Chair to be taken at half-past 3 precisely.
His Worship the Mayor will preside.[4]

July 14 THE MERCURY. WITH WHICH ARE INCORPORATED THE "COLONIAL TIMES," THE "TASMANIAN DAILY NEWS" AND "DAILY COURIER." THURSDAY, JULY 14TH, 1859. WE are very glad to perceive that a number of our citizens have convened a public meeting to be held at the Bird-in-Hand, Argyle-street, to-morrow afternoon to consider a proposal, which will be found in another column, to establish a Quartz Crushing and Mining Company under the title of "The Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company." The object of the proposed Company is stated to be "to procure and employ Machinery for Quartz Crushing or alluvial sinking in any part of Tasmania where reasonable prospects offer to repay the Company for their outlay." The promoters of the scheme have recommended, and these recommendations will be taken into consideration tomorrow, that the Company shall have a capital of twenty thousand pounds in four thousand shares of five pounds each with limited liability. It is proposed to demand a fee of one shilling per share to meet preliminary expenses; also a deposit of two shillings and six-pence per share on allotment; seven shillings and sixpence per share in cash within thirty days; and ten shillings per share by a promissory note at three months. This would make one pound per share paid up. It is not intended that any additional call shall exceed ten shillings per share, whilst sixty days must elapse between each and every call. The scale of voting has been likewise announced in the advertisement, as well as certain proposals for the constitution of the Directory. To these we refer our readers. This important subject is beginning now to assume a new aspect, an aspect which renders it incumbent upon us as public journalists to call especial attention to it. Hitherto a want of faith in the existence of mineral wealth in Tasmania, partly justified, we admit, by the vexatious and disheartening disappointments to which we have been so repeatedly subjected, has been the chief if not the only obstacle in the way of its development. It does appear strange, and in the eyes of our neighbors it must appear unaccountable, that this gigantic element of prosperity should have existed, aye and knowingly existed, without having quickened the energy of our population or led to the adoption of such measures as would have secured to us all the amazing benefits which must have followed its development. Others estimate the wealth of our gold fields by our own conduct with regard to them. Our supineness and indifference is not charged by them upon our own characters as it ought to be, but it is attributed to the unexciting nature of the discoveries which have been made. They cannot understand how men in the known possession of great wealth could possibly resist the temptation of realizing that wealth; and they, therefore, as a more probable solution of the difficulty, content themselves with believing that our gold fields are all moonshine and our reputed wealth a fable. There is a far greater amount of wisdom in such an assumption as this than there is in the conduct which renders such an assumption natural and justifiable. If our neighbours have no faith in our gold fields it is mainly because we either have no faith in them ourselves or, what is to the same purpose, we act as if we had not. Our actions in the eyes of all energetic and business-like men are an emphatic contradiction of our assertions. No one will believe that the people of this Colony are so indolent and apathetic as they really are. Such conduct is so strange and inexplicable that men cannot understand it. If you talk to them about the wealth of Fingal they do not believe a word you say; and what is the reason for their unbelief? Simply this. They tell you that if there was gold in such quantities there the Tasmanians would not be such "darn'd idiots" as to neglect getting it for themselves. Like men of the world they refuse to believe any statements which are practically contradicted by the actions of those who make them. This practical unbelief, however, is now, we are happy to say, dying out. That we possess rich gold fields is now admitted, not only by a mere mental assent, but by the steps which are being taken to make our wealth available. And this is the new aspect which the subject presents. Nearly all the energy now being displayed has been put forth by our brethren on the northern side of the Island. Whilst the Southern Capitalists are holding meetings and talking about the wisdom of forming Companies, our northern friends have shot a long way ahead. They have already formed a Company, engaged a scientific Manager from Victoria, ordered machinery, and, in a month or two, will be carrying their weekly return to the credit side of their ledger; whilst here, in the Capital of the Colony, nothing whatever has been done! What must be the inevitable result of this if the same unworthy conduct is persisted in? Is it nothing that the whole of the benefits arising from this discovery should be adsorbed by Launceston? We are not jealous of our northern friends. Nothing would give us greater pleasure than to see them reap a rich harvest for the energy they are now displaying. They deserve it; and we have no manner of doubt but that it will be secured to them. But that does not exonerate the Capitalists on this side of the Island from the blame which rests upon them for their apathy. In this, as in everything else, the people of Launceston have outstripped us. All the advantages we might derive from our magnificent harbor and from our being the Capital of the Colony are being neutralised by our southern indolence and northern enterprise. Not a single Company that we are aware of has been formed in Hobart Town for the purpose of realizing our wealth. Meetings have been held and proposals have been made and discussed, and there the matter has ended. Nothing, however, let it be remembered, can now stop the development of our gold fields. The attention they have attracted will secure them from neglect. Even if in the capital of the Colony not one man was found to assist in the work, still they must progress. The question is not now—have we a payable gold field? but, are we on the South side of the Island to derive any advantage from the discovery now that the discovery has been made? This is the question which must be decided and speedily. Every day of hesitation is a day lost. In a very brief period the Midland and the Northern companies will have their heavy machinery at work; and, although we believe our auriferous reefs to be inexhaustible, yet all the honor and all the advantage of developing these treasures will be exclusively confined to the other side of the Island. Hobart Town will never be mentioned in connexion with Fingal, and Hobart Town does not deserve that it should be. We are glad, however, to see that an attempt to form a Company on this side of the Island is now being made. If the proposals which have been placed before the public are adopted and carried out with energy and spirit we may yet be in time to commence operations coeval with our more spirited friends in the north. We look upon it that the reputation of the Capital is at stake in this matter; and, as our monied men appear to be too indolent to redeem that reputation, let us hope that it will be accomplished by the more humble and unassuming proprietory of the Southern Tasmanian Company.[5]

July 16 QUARTZ CRUSHING AND MINING COMPANY. Yesterday afternoon a numerous meeting of citizens and others took place at Mr. Basstian's, the Bird-in-Hand, Argyle-street, in order to establish a Quartz Crushing and Mining Company, as notified by advertisement, under the title of The Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company for the purpose of employing machinery for Quartz Crushing or Alluvial Sinking in any part of Tasmania where reasonable prospects offer to repay the Company for their outlay. The meeting was called, for half-past 3, and it was announced that the Mayor would preside, and accordingly, on the motion of Mr. Worley seconded by Mr. Davies, His Worship was voted to the chair. The Chairman having adverted to the advertisement calling the meeting, said the subject was one of great importance, and the discoveries at Fingal led the gentlemen whose names he had read to call the meeting, and by that they had incurred a great responsibility. He would leave to them the details of the business, and if the meeting approved of their proposals a Provisional Committee would be appointed to organize and carry out the objects of the meeting. Mr. Worley said it now devolved upon him to place the objects of the Company plainly before the meeting. About a fortnight ago a meeting was called by a few zealous friends, who thought that measures ought to be adopted by the middle classes to avail themselves of the advantages presented by the gold discoveries at Fingal; few, however, attended, and another meeting was held at which a committee was appointed to re-consider, and, if possible, to improve the propositions previously adopted; since that meeting the Committee had met frequently and had agreed on the propositions which had been submitted to the public; they do not, however, pledge themselves to those proposals, although they believe that they are such as to ensure the safety and success of the Company. He thought that all would agree that the time had come when they must do something, and the question was, what was that something. The formation of a company had been suggested, and it was for the meeting now to consider and decide whether a company should be formed, and to sanction or otherwise the mode proposed for carrying out its objects. It would be strange if, with the experience of the present day, they should not be enabled to originate something better than had been formed in the olden time; they had a limited liability for their protection, and although no law had actually passed, he was enabled to say that an Act would be passed in the next session to secure this benefit for the commercial community. And, perhaps, it would be better for him to explain the meaning of limited liability; it meant, then, that no shareholder could be called upon under any circumstances to pay more than 25 per cent above the amount of his share. They would thus see how important such a protection would be to persons of limited means, who would know exactly how much they would have to pay even under the most adverse circumstances. Mr. Worley now proceeded to explain the other items in the prospectus, reading the document at length, and leaving it to the meeting to approve of or modify any portion, or the whole; he concluded by moving that the proposals laid before the meeting be approved of. Mr. J. Symons seconded. Mr. J. Davies, as one of the committee, felt it incumbent upon him to offer a few remarks upon one or two points which had been considered in committee, but which had been omitted, no doubt, inadvertently. In rising to support the resolution which had been proposed, he would take leave to point out that with regard to the important appointment of a Field Officer, or General Manager, that would be within the province of the Directory; and for the information of the gentlemen who might compose it, he would state that he conscientiously believed no gentleman on this side of the Straits was properly qualified for that office; he did not say this with any intention of giving offence to any one, nor did he think that any gentleman in this Colony would offer to undertake the duties. When he was in Melbourne a few days ago he made many enquiries relative to Quartz Crushing, and found that none but practical and experienced men were fit for the work; even a man experienced in California was not suited for Victoria. He came over with Mr. Nevins, one of the ablest men in the latter Colony, and from him he derived the information which he should now impart to the meeting. He assured him that even with regard to the appointment of Mr. Gould, the Government Geologist, his theoretical knowledge was not worth a straw in Tasmania or Victoria, and it was a well-authenticated fact amongst scientific men that theoretical knowledge with respect to these colonies was altogether valueless, when put in competition, to use Mr. Nevins' own words, with the experience of the pick and shovel. (Cheers.) He, Mr. Nevins, also stated that all the geological theories propounded by scientific writers with regard to the Quartz Reefs had been entirely upset by the practical working in Victoria; he, Mr. Davies, did not understand this, but he mentioned the fact to show that practical men, and practical men only, could efficiently and successfully carry out the objects of the Company. With respect to the wide scope of the Prospectus, they would perceive that the operations of the Company would not be confined to Fingal, (cheers,) and it was probable from the various discoveries that were daily reaching us that in the coming spring a wide scope would be open to the Company. He should propose, therefore, that the Company should at once go vigorously to work; the spring would soon arrive, and the appointment of the various officers, with the establishment of other necessary preliminaries, would occupy about three months, and it was highly desirable that the Company should be in full and active operation before the summer was on the wane. These were the only matters with which he should trouble the meeting, with one exception, and he wished to throw out a hint to those who would have the management of affairs. The formation of Quartz Crushing Machines was so simple that there was no necessity to go abroad for their construction, and if effected here a very great advantage would be gained. (Applause.) We were a very poor Colony, indeed, if machines of this description could not be manufactured here. He was told they could be made in this city, and he had no hesitation in saying that it was the duty of the Directory so to have them made if they could be manufactured equally well as in other places. (Renewed cheers,) Mr. Davies now referred to the Prospectus, which he thought had been prepared on a liberal basis, and explained further the effect of limited liability; if a Company be found to-day, and the capital paid up, and then by adverse circumstances, as mismanagement or otherwise, the funds became exhausted, each shareholder would be simply liable to 25 per cent. on the amount of his shares for the debt incurred; thus it was important to the laborer and artisan clearly to understand, that under any adverse circumstances he would only be liable to pay £6 5s. for his £5 share; it was better, Mr. Davies said, to take the bull by the horns in matters of this kind, and state the fact fairly at once. He had now simply to support the resolution, believing as he did that the Company would be successful, and that it would take a good slice from the good things that were offered to them. He knew from communication with mercantile men that speculators in Victoria were only waiting to take advantage of the supineness of others, and he had no hesitation in stating that when Mr. Nevins's report of the auriferous wealth of Fingal reached Victoria, they would find that strangers would flock to this Colony, and, unless prepared to prevent it, deprive them of that to which they were fairly and justly entitled. (Cheers.) The resolution was put from the chair and carried unanimously. Mr. J. A. Thomson moved that the following names be added to the Provisional Committee:—Dr. Doughty, Dr. Stewart, Messrs. C. O. Atkins, Belbin, and J. E. Risby. Mr. Hebblewhite in seconding the motion wished to offer a remark on an idea that had gone abroad, to the effect that the original Committee would have the handling of the funds of the Company, and the whole responsibility; he wished it to be understood that the Committee of which he was a member had been appointed merely to prepare preliminaries, and that had they not have been re-elected their functions would have ceased. The motion was put and carried. Mr. Worley moved, and Mr. Symons seconded: That persons to whom shares are allotted be required to pay the amount of the first instalment of 2s. 6d. into the Van Diemen's Land Bank, to the credit of the Company, and that parties failing to pay within the time fixed forfeit their shares, which shall revert to the Company. The motion was carried. It was then moved, seconded, and carried unanimously that the Mayor be appointed Provisional Treasurer for the Company. His Worship intimated his willingness to accept the office. A vote of thanks was passed to the Chairman, and the meeting separated. A share list was opened in the room, and upwards of 400 shares were taken, and the deposit paid.

July 16 THE NEW GOLD COMPANY. IN another column will be found a report of the meeting held yesterday afternoon at the Bird-in-Hand, Argyle-street, to consider certain proposals for the formation of a new Company to be styled the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company. The meeting was as we expected one of the most numerous and influential we have seen assembled for some time. One feeling animated all who were present; and we have no doubt whatever but that the Company now formed will prove by its energy that we are not altogether indifferent on this side of the island to the advantages to be derived from the development of our Gold Fields. [33]

July 18-28 Proposal to establish a QUARTZ CRUSHING & MINING COMPANY, Under the following title— THE SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING & MINING COMPANY FOR the purpose of employing Machinery for Quartz Crushing or Alluvial Sinking in any part of Tasmania where reasonable prospects offer to repay the Company for their outlay. The accounts received from many individuals, whose testimony cannot he doubted, confirm most fully statements which have been made repeatedly as to the highly auriferous character of Fingal, and other places, which justify immediate action, with the view of turning to account such invaluable treasures. Individual efforts, while applicable to alluvial diggings, which usually require but moderate means to effect important results, appear to be totally inadequate for carrying on with any prospect of success the more elaborate and expensive works of Quartz Crushing and Mining Operations upon a large scale. The necessity therefore arises for establishing a Company with sufficient capital in order that powerful Machinery may be purchased and applied to works of magnitude, and difficulty beyond the scope of mere manual labour. By the instrumentality of a well-organized Company the means can be easily secured, the proprietary protected, and a reasonable assurance of success presented to reward enterprise aided by discretion. The promoters recommend to public consideration the following suggestions as a basis upon which a popular and soundly constituted Company should be formed.
Title —The Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company.
Capital— £20,000, in 4,000 Shares of £5 each.
Limited Liability.
Fee— One Shilling per Share to meet preliminary expenses.
Deposit-2s. 6d. per Share, upon allotment.
7s. 6d. cash within 30 days.
10s 0d Promissory Note 3 months.
£1 0s. 0d.
Future calls not to exceed 10s per
Share at intervals of not less than 60 days.
SCALE of VOTING.
2 Shares. 1 Vote
5 do ........ 2 do
10 do ........ 3 do
20 do ........ 4 do
30 do ........ 5 do
40 do ........ 6 do
55 do ........ 7 do
70 do ........ 8 do
85 do ........ 9 do
100 do ........10 do
No Shareholder to have more than 10 votes whatever number of Shares he may hold. Voting by proxy allowed. The Directory to consist of 15 members. Five to be the quorum. Qualification not less than 5 Shares. When half the number of Shares are disposed of a meeting of Shareholders to be called, and a Directory to be appointed. The appointment of the Company's Officers to be vested in the Directory. At a Public Meeting held at Basstian's, July 15th, D. Lewis, Esq., Mayor, in the chair, the above scheme was unanimously approved of, and a Provisional Committee appointed to carry it into effect. Forms of application for Shares may be had from any of the undersigned, and all inquiries will be answered by Mr. Worley, at the Mart, Elizabeth-street.
(Signed)
C. O. Atkins, Murray-street.
W. Belbin, New Wharf. .
J. Davies, Mercury Office.
J. Dickenson, Trafalgar Place.
Dr Doughty. Elizabeth-street.
A. Gellie, Davey-street.
N. Gerrand, Liverpool-street.
J. C. Hall, Advertiser Office.
W. Hebblewhite, Franklin Wharf.
W. Johnston, Patrick-street.
G. Morgan, Liverpool-street.
F. Paterson, Liverpool-street.
J. E. Risby, Battery Point.
W. R. Stewart, Campbell-street.
J. Symons, Fitzroy Crescent.
R. Worley, Elizabeth-street.
G. Rolwegan, Collins-street,
Provisional Committee.
R. Jarman, 46, Murray-street,
Provisional Secretary.
The Committee desire to enlist the hearty co-operation of their fellow-citizens in a movement which will in all probability affect their material interests in a very important degree. The scheme proposed has been conceived with the utmost care, and is based upon that safe and equitable principle, limited liability, which will protect subscribers from any possibility of loss exceeding 25 per cent. beyond the amount of their shares. That there may be no misunderstanding in a matter of such moment, the Committee wish to state, for the information of those who may not be generally informed upon the subject, that a Limited Liability Act has been printed, and will be introduced into Parliament in the following Session. Should any thing occur in the chapter of accidents to prevent the passing of the said Act, or any other of a similar character, the promoters of the S. T. Q. C. & M. Company pledge themselves to bring in a Special Act, or relinquish the project. [10]

July 19 THE SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING AND MINING COMPANY. We are glad to learn that a large number of Shares in this Company has already been taken. We have been told that several citizens have refused, or manifested a reluctance, to join in this enterprise from doubts as to the eligibility of some of those now acting as a Provisional Committee to have the management of launching a Company of so much magnitude and importance. But this is very absurd. The gentlemen who are now acting as a Committee are only, as their name implies, a "Provisional" Committee. So soon as the proportion of shares named in the prospectus has been taken, the Shareholders will be called upon to elect their Manager, Secretary, and Directors. It will be in their own power then to elect whom they please; not one of those now acting as a Provisional Committee need of necessity be elected. Indeed if the Shareholders have not confidence in them they assuredly will not be. For us to refuse, therefore, to subscribe to the undertaking simply because one or two of these gentlemen do not, in our opinion, possess the necessary qualifications for successfully carrying out the objects of the Company after it has been formed would be to refuse on grounds which will never probably exist; or which certainly will not exist without the concurrence of a majority of the Shareholders. We published yesterday from the columns of a northern Contemporary, a statement shewing how profitable this and all similar enterprises must prove; and it would indeed be a great pity to allow our embryo Company to languish for want of public support merely because one or two parties have been connected with the preliminary arrangements in whom we have no confidence. The citizens will have the election of their own officers in their own hands; and we would earnestly remind them that if they permit the present attempt to miscarry it will probably be a long time before another chance will be afforded them. [34]

July 23 ANOTHER PROSPECTIVE GOLD COMPANY. ARRANGEMENTS have been made by some influential citizens for the formation of another Quartz Crushing Company, dependent, however, upon certain contingents. The matter originated almost accidentally. A gentleman named MILLIKEN having acquired a competency by gold digging in Victoria has visited this Colony previous to his departure to Britain; calling at the office of Mr. Charles BUTLER, the solicitor, he was shown some quartz specimens from Fingal, which he at once pronounced of the right sort. This [unintelligible] known to [unintelligible] and about thirty met yesterday at Mr. BUTLER'S, when it was decided that Mr. MILLIKEN should forthwith proceed to Fingal, accompanied by Mr. SPONG, the Surveyor, to prospect for a payable reef, the amount for the necessary expenses being subscribed on the spot. If these gentlemen succeed in discovering an available reef, measures will be promptly taken to organize another Quartz Crushing Company; of the finding, not only of one, but of several reefs there can be no doubt, and we may, consequently. consider the new Company as virtually formed.[13]

July 26 HOBART TOWN. The Mercury states that upwards of twelve hundred shares have been taken in the Quartz-Crushing Company, and that arrangements have been made by some influential citizens for the formation of another company. A gentleman named Milliken having acquired a competency by gold digging in Victoria, has visited this colony previous to his departure to Britain; calling at the office of Mr. Charles Butler, the solicitor, he was shown some quartz specimens from Fingal, which he at once pronounced of the right sort. Thirty gentlemen met yesterday at Mr. Butler's, when it was decided that Mr. Milliken should forthwith proceed to Fingal, accompanied by Mr. Spong, the surveyor, to prospect for a payable reef, the amount for the necessary expenses being subscribed on the spot. [35]

July 26 SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING AND MINING COMPANY. The Provisional Committee met yesterday, when they were favored with the attendance of Mr. Milliken whose advice and suggestions were extremely valuable, so much so, indeed, as to induce the Committee to assume the responsibility of despatching accredited agents to Fingal in Company with that gentleman to select and put in a claim for quartz reefs on behalf of the Company. It was certainly an oversight that this measure was not proposed at the late meeting, but as the Committee have acted in this manner solely with a view to expedite and enhance the interests of the shareholders, the proceeding will, no doubt, be sanctioned by them; should this, however, not be the case the Committee are prepared to liquidate the expenses of the agency. We think the Committee are deserving of praise for acting thus energetically; it evinces on their part an anxious interest in behalf of the shareholders, and a desire to adopt the best means to promote their views and advantages. The shares, we are happy to say, are being quickly taken up, and but a short time can elapse before the Company is placed in tangible working order. The activity of the Committee affords an ample guarantee for future success, and we have not the slightest doubt, but that our Quartz Crushing and Mining Company will shortly prove the most prosperous project of the day.[14]

July 28 THE SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING COMPANY. The Provisional Committee met yesterday afternoon, when Messrs. JOHN DAVIES, WILLIAM HEBBLEWHITE, ROBERT WORLEY, C. Q. ATKINS, and Dr. DOUGHTY, were elected as a Sub-Committee to make the necessary preliminary arrangements for the election of Directors. Two thousand and fifty shares have been applied for. The Committee have resolved to allot three thousand reserving one thousand to hand over to the Directors with the understanding that the original Shareholders should be entitled to a priority in any future allotment of shares.[36]

July 30 QUARTZ CRUSHING AND MINING COMPANY. The Provisional Committee met yesterday and resolved that their operations should be closed at half-past three o'clock this afternoon; up to this time, however, shares will be allotted as usual, but after this those for which application have been made will be handed over to the Directory when elected. We would remind intending shareholders that if their shares be not taken to-day they can take no part in the Election of the Directors. We are enabled to state, on the authority of the Premier, that a Bill to declare a Limited Liability in certain Joint Stock Companies will be introduced in the forthcoming Session of Parliament, and that the measure will have especial applicability to Quartz Crushing and Gold Mining Companies at Fingal.[37]

July 28 - August 5 Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company, July 27th, 1859. AT a SPECIAL GENEBAL MEETING of the Provisional Committee held this day, it was unanimously resolved: "That as upwards of 2000 Shares have been applied for and the fees paid, this Committee take immediate steps to arrange for a General Meeting of Share-holders to elect 15 Directors, and also that the full number of Shares already applied for be allotted to each applicant." The Provisional Committee will continue to receive applications for Shares, but will only allot to the extent of another 1000, as they intend to place the remainder at the disposal of the future Directory. By order of the Provisional Committee, RICHARD JARMAN, Provisional Secretary. [38]

August

August 2 – 6 Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company. Two Thousand Six Hundred Shares have been applied for and the Fees Paid. THE Provisional Committee have therefore resolved to allot the said Shares to the respective parties, who will be immediately instructed as to the precise mode in which the deposits &c. must be paid. The Directory will have to be elected from the Subscribers of the said 2600 Shares, who will be informed in due course of every particular relating to the Election. No further application for Shares received until the Directory is appointed. ROBERT WORLEY, Chairman to Provisional Committee, August 1st, 1850. [11]

August 5 - 8 THE SUBSCRIBERS TO THE SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING & MINING COMPANY, ARE INFORMED that the deposits &c, directed to be paid into the Van Diemen's Land Bank, will be received by the Provisional Treasurer, David Lewis, Esq., at the premises of Messrs. R. Lewis & Sons, Collins-street, between the hours of 10 and 1, and 2 and 4. By order of the Committee, ROBEBT WORLEY, Chairman. Hobart Town, August 4th, 1859. [39]

August 8 Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company. THE TIME for PAYMENT of the FIRST DEPOSITS is extended from MONDAY, the 8lh, to WEDNESDAY, the 10th of August. Payment to be made to the Provisional Treasurer, D. Lewis, Esq., at the premises of Messrs. E. Lewis & Sons, Collins-street, between the hours of 10 and 1, and 2 and 4. Information relative to the Election of Directors, will be duly forwarded to the Shareholders. By order of the Provisional Committee, RICHARD JARMAN Provisional Secretary. Hobart Town, August 6th, 1859. [12]

August 11 In addition to the Launceston Company, and to others now being formed, we have the Southern Tasmanian Quartz-crushing and Mining Company. This Company has been formed upon a very popular basis. It consists of four thousand shares at five pounds per share—Limited Liability; and the payments are spread over a period of some months so as to enable small capitalists to embark in the enterprise. Upwards of two thousand six hundred shares have already been apportioned, and so soon as the directors have been elected and officers appointed, active steps will be taken to procure the necessary machinery. A gentleman has been despatched to prospect the country near Fingal for a new reef; and in the meantime numbers of the Shareholders have forwarded their claims for registration. From the known energy of character of many of those who have taken the lead in bringing this company into existence the proprietary seem convinced that it will be a most and a deservedly successful enterprise. In fact all are preparing for active operations in the spring; operations, which, we feel more and more persuaded, are destined by their results to lift Tasmania from her hitherto neglected and despised position into one of considerable importance amongst the Australias. [16]

August 11 Of great importance to Hobart Town, and, by consequence, to the Colony, is the formation of a Quartz-Crushing and Mining Company, the first meeting of which took place at the Bird-in-Hand, on the 15th ult., His Worship the Mayor taking the Chair. The meeting, which was numerously and influentially attended, was animated by one feeling in favor or the project, and as it has been formed with a view to the interests of the middle classes, there can be no doubt but that it will be ultimately and prosperously successful. The particulars of both these events will be found in another place.[40]

August 17-24 Southern Tasmanian Quartz-Crushing and Mining Company. ELECTION OF DIRECTORS. A PUBLIC MEETING will be held at Basstian's," Bird-in-Hand," Argyle-street, on WEDNESDAY, 24th August, 1859, at 1 o'clock precisely, to receive the report of the Provisional Committee, to appoint Scrutineers, and elect fifteen Directors. Should any Shareholder not have received the Circular containing a list of those qualified for Directors which has been forwarded per post, he can obtain the same upon application to me. ROBERT WORLEY, Chairman of the Provisional Committee. *The name of Mr. H. Boyes was accidentally omitted from the list of persons qualified for Directors.[21]

August 23 Southern Tasmanian Quartz-Crushing and Mining Company. A PUBLIC MEETING of the SHAREHOLDERS will be held at Basstian's "Bird-in-Hand," Argyle-street, on WEDNESDAY, August 24th, 1859, at one o'clock precisely, "To receive the report of the Provisional Committee, appoint Scrutineers, and elect Fifteen Directors." The Polling will commence at 2, and conclude at 4 o'clock. The following qualified Shareholders have been duly nominated and consent to serve if elected:
Andrews, W. F. J.
Arnold, George
Atkins, C. O.
Barclay, David
Basstian, Christopher
Beaumont, W. G.
Bolbin, William
Boyall, W. C.
Boys, William
Burgess, Murray
Buller, Charles
Chipman, H. J.
Cherry, George
Cleburne. Richard
Coram, J. T.
Cox, H. T. C.
Davies, John
Dickenson, John
Doughty, John
Dowdell. Charles
Drake. F. J.
Dunkley, David
Edwards, R. T.
Fisher, Thomas
Franklin. R. T.
Fryer, J. R.
Gerrand, Nicholas
Hall, J C.
Hamilton, William
Hebblewhite, William
Hood, R.L.
Hornby, William
Johnston, William
Lees, F,R,
Lewis, David
M'Meekan, Anthony
McGrath, John
Middleton. M.A.G.
Milward, John
Morgan, George
Newman, Richard
Overell, J.J.
Park, James
Parker, Henry
Paterson, Frederick
Paterson, Thomas
Pettard, William
Piguenit, F,L,
Purkiss, William
Risby, J.E.
Robb, William
Roberts, J.G.
Rolwegan, George
Scott, Hopetown
Scott, Sandford
Sly, James
Smith, W. C, D,
Solomon, J. Church-street
Solomon, J. Macquarie-street
Stewart, W. R.
Symons, John
Thomas, Frederick
Thomson, J. A.
Tolman, J. C.
Wescott, W. F. J.
Wilson, J. M.
Wimbush, Thomas
Worley, Robert
SCALE OF VOTING.
2 Shares. 1 Vote
5 do .............. 2 do
10 do .............. 3 do
20 do .............. 4 do
30 do .............. 5 do
40 do .............. 6 do
55 do .............. 7 do
70 do .............. 8 do
85 do .............. 9 do
100 do ..............10 do
Polling Papers will be supplied at the meeting, and printed proxies may be obtained of the Chairman of the Provisional Committee. Fifteen persons must be voted for and their names indicated by a X and any polling paper having more or less than 15 names marked, will be rejected. ROBERT WORLEY, Chairman. Elizabeth-street, August 20th, 1859.[41]

August 22 THE SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING AND MINING COMPANY. FRIDAY was the last day for nominating parties for the responsible office of Directors to the New Company, and the names of those who have been proposed will be found in another column. From these gentlemen the Shareholders will have no difficulty in selecting fifteen possessed of energy and business habits to manage the affairs of this new and promising enterprise. Much will depend upon the manner in which the proprietary discharge this highly important duty. If the Company is to be, as it was originally intended to be, a Tradesmen's Company, the Directors should be selected from amongst that class; they should be men in whom the shareholders have confidence; men whose sympathies are in harmony with their own. Because a man is wealthy that is no reason why he should be a thoroughly practical man of business. It is the assistance of this latter class which must be secured if it is wished that the Company should be prosperous, and we shall be grievously disappointed, therefore, should we find that the advantage of having such men has been sacrificed either to private friendship or to wealth. The election will take place at the Bird-in-Hand, Argyle-street, on Wednesday next, at one o'clock, at which time it is to be hoped the Shareholders will attend and vote for those gentlemen whom they may deem best qualified for carrying out successfully the objects for which the Company has been formed. [22]

August 24 SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ-CRUSHING AND MINING COMPANY. We would remind the Shareholders of this promising Company that they will be called upon this day to elect fifteen of their own number to form a Directory for the management of their affairs. That the future prosperity of this enterprise will mainly depend upon the character and business habits of those who may be elected no one doubts; and we do not deny, therefore, that we are somewhat solicitous as to the result of this day's proceedings. We have already stated our opinion as to the men whose claims should be considered paramount. We do not want men of wealth in the Directory so much as men of untiring energy, and these should be selected, as far as practicable, from the class to which a large majority of the proprietors belong. However, we will not doubt but that every Shareholder will take a deep interest in the success of the Quartz-Crushing and Mining Company; and this is by far the best guarantee we can possibly have for the judicious exercise of his privileges. The voting, which will be by ballot, will commence at the "Bird-in-Hand," Argyle street, at one o'clock and close at 4 o'clock this afternoon. [23]

August 25 SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING AND MINING COMPANY. A Public Meeting of the Shareholders was holden at Mr. Basstian's, Bird-in-hand, Argyle-street, at one o'clock yesterday, "to receive the Report of the Provisional Committee, appoint scrutineers, and elect Fifteen Directors." The Meeting which had caused much interest from the rapidity with which the large number of shares for issue had been taken up, and the important objects which the Company have in view, was very largely attended. Among those present, were the Right Worshipful the Mayor, (David Lewis Esq.,) and Messrs. W. G. Beaumont, Dr. Doughty, J. A. Thompson. R. T. C. Yates, C. Basstian, Belbin, Edwards, Risby. Rolwegan, J. Symons, Cherry, R. L. Hood, J. Davies, T. J. Crouch, Dickenson, Cox, Seabrook, Petterd, Franklin, Sly, Andrews, Smith, Gellie, Minnis, Wright, Dunkley, C. Hall, sen. G. Morgan, J. Hall, C. Hall jun., Watson, &c. His Worship the Mayor, was called to the Chair by acclamation. The Chairman said he had again the pleasure to preside over a meeting of much importance, and without detaining the members present from proceeding with the business for which they had been convened, would call upon Mr. Worley to read the Report of the Provisional Committee, and the Shareholders could then proceed to the election of Scrutineers and Directors. Mr. Worley, Chairman of the Committee, then read the report. On the motion of Mr. Hebblewhite, seconded by Mr. Beaumont, the report was received and unanimously adopted. A vote of thanks was also passed by the shareholders to the secretary and other gentlemen forming the Provisional Committee, for the exceedingly clever manner in which they had performed the affairs of the Company. Mr. Worley, in acknowledgment, said the approval of the shareholders was a sufficient award to the Committee for their exertions, and that he trusted the success which had hitherto accompanied them would be a fair guarantee for the future prosperity of the Company, and he hoped they would now elect such officers as would carry out their enterprise to a happy conclusion. The meeting then proceeded to the first business of the day, and after the names of many of the shareholders had been mentioned, on the motion of Mr. Basstian, seconded by Mr. Worley, the following were appointed Scrutineers:— Messrs. Yates, Watson, Lovett, Gellie, Fleming, and Saunders. Mr. Andrews, before they proceeded to the election of Directors, said they should settle the principles upon which the Company should act. By one of the rules in the prospectus it was laid down that if a person did not vote for the whole number of fifteen Directors, that voter should be disfranchised. To this rule he strongly objected, on the ground that each shareholder had a constitutional right to vote for the whole, or for any part of the whole number. Again, he was of opinion that voting by proxies was objectionable, and contended that this system was unjust and unsafe, and that the moment a party gave his proxy to another shareholder, that party had not only disfranchised himself, but had also done an injury to the other members by thus giving an irresponsible power to an individual who might, could, and probably would exercise it in a manner injurious to the interests of the Company. He, therefore, gave notice that at the next general meeting he should give notice that no more proxies be held. Mr. Basstian having mentioned that there was an impression abroad that one gentleman had been canvassing for proxies of which he held a great number, Mr. Hebblewhite moved and Mr. Dickenson seconded that Mr. Basstian be called upon by the meeting to name. Mr. Morgan, Mr. J. Symons, and many others objected to this being done, unless bona fide proof could be given that the party alluded to had actually canvassed. Other members expressed their opinion that the canvassing for proxies was perfectly legitimate and that it was not right to call upon Mr. Basstian to name. Mr. Basstian was in the hands of the meeting, but he had only mentioned the rumor, as he considered it was his duty to do so, being of opinion that if a rumor got abroad that an undue influence had been made to obtain votes it would prove prejudicial to the Company. The conversation as to the propriety of calling for the name of the party referred to was still continuing, when Mr. Andrews remarked that his observations had been made in opposition to the principle of voting by proxies and not with reference to this meeting or to any particular person. Mr. Davies would occupy the time of the meeting for a few minutes simply to set the matter at rest. It was the rule in almost every joint stock company in England that proxies should be issued. He held some himself from his own daughter as he had a perfect right to do, and he thought the same principle which was observed in every other place with regard to proxies should be observed here. The rule allowing the issue of proxies had been allowed by the shareholders adopting the prospectus, and if there had been any objection to that rule, the time to have brought it forward was when the prospectus was submitted to them, and then it could have been amended in that particular. But the body of the members had confirmed the report recommending that proxies be issued, and it appeared to him that this meeting emanating as it did from the original meeting could not discuss it at the present moment. Mr. Andrews had given notice of his intention to bring the question forward some weeks hence which would be the proper time to alter any rule which they might think injurious to the interests of the Company, but to introduce the question now was only calculated to raise a feeling detrimental to their general good, and might probably be the precursor of a very considerable deal of altercation and dissension, which he was glad to say had not existed at the commencement of the Company. There could be no doubt that any member aspiring to the office of Director could exercise his right of obtaining proxies, nor was there anything dishonest in that, but whether it was in good taste to do so he was not prepared to say; but as that right had been conceded it could not be disputed now. Mr. Davies then explained that the rule was settled in committee that a ballot paper should be void if it did not contain the names of the whole fifteen, and that it was introduced on his own suggestion to prevent jobbery and to make every one vote. Mr. Yates, after a few further observations had been made as to whether voting by proxy would or would not conduce to the benefit of the society, moved as an amendment of the motion that Mr. Basstian be called to name —that the meeting proceed to the election of directors. Mr. J. Hall wished to move that the Directors be called upon to dispose of no more shares, without first calling a special meeting, but withdrew it on being informed that it could not be discussed now, intimating his intention of bringing the subject forward at the next general meeting. Mr. Basstian suggested as there were, as he was informed, a large number of proxies in the room, that the meeting be adjourned for a week. (No, no.) Mr. J. A. Thomson had met a gentleman who told him he could not attend the meeting, and had given him his proxy, but he (Mr. Thomson) had heard that one gentleman in the room had fifty or sixty proxies in his pocket, but as it would be unjust to pass a vote at this meeting that there should be no proxies, he agreed that the meeting should be postponed. Mr. Worley understood from some remarks which had fallen, that he was the gentleman referred to (Mr. Thompson answered in the affirmative). Well, he had as many as six, not sixty, in his pocket, and he supposed they were sent to him because the parties who entrusted them to him, knew he took a deep interest in the Company. The conversation then dropped, and the election of fifteen directors by ballot was proceeded with. After eight hours scrutiny the Scrutineers returned at half-past 12 o'clock, the following list which the Mayor declared duly elected
DIRECTORS:—
D. Lewis ... ... ... ... 626
J. Symons ... ... ... 352
J. Doughty ... ... ... 329
C. O. Atkins . ... ... 319
R.T.Edwards ... ... 314
J. M. Wilson ... ... 312
J. C. Hall .... ... ... 309
W. Hebblewhite 301
R. Worley .. ... ... 299
J. Davies .. ... ... 292
G. Morgan .... ... 259
C. Basstian ... ... 258
G. Rolwegan ... 258
J. E. Risby ... ... 222
D. Barclay ... ... 221[42]

August 25 SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING COMPANY. The strong interest taken by the Shareholders in the progress of the Southern Tasmanian Quartz-Crushing and Mining Company is the best guarantee we could possibly have for its future success. Every one who attended the meeting yesterday, and, as will be seen by the report in another column, the meeting was a very large one, spoke and acted with earnestness. Not a doubt was expressed as to the ultimate success of the enterprise. That the Company would be most successful if judiciously and energetically conducted was freely admitted; and we are quite willing to believe that any little acerbity manifested on this occasion arose solely from the earnest desire of those who indulged in it to secure this great object. We all know how suspicious men are sometimes apt to be in matters of this kind, and it would have been surprising had the launching of a Company formed for so exciting an object as that of gold-finding been exempt from this almost universal rule. Had this feeling been absent we should have doubted whether the enterprise really commanded the sympathy of the public. The Shareholders are undoubtedly under a deep obligation to the Provisional Committee for the practical and business-like manner in which they have brought the Company up to its present satisfactory position. Their important duties have been discharged in a manner which reflects credit upon themselves and which is likely to prove beneficial to the Company. All the preliminary matters have been most successfully arranged. The vessel has been built and launched. All admire her model, and wait now with considerable anxiety to see the amount of skill the new Directory will display in rigging and fitting her out for sea. Every day brings us additional cheering intelligence with regard to the undoubted wealth of our gold fields. The large increase in the weekly return obtained from the Midland Company's machine during the past week, notwithstanding its imperfection and the silence of its stampers, has awakened more than ordinary excitement. In another column will be found also the weekly Official Report of the Commissioner of the Gold Fields, a Report which no one can read without participating in the confidence it breathes as to the future prospects of the Colony. On the Northern side of the Island additional intelligence has been obtained, intelligence which, if reliable, will remove all doubt as to the highly auriferous character of the country along the banks of the River Forth. Even the men who for years past have been satisfied with the result of their labors are now becoming sensible of their folly in having confined their operations to mere fossicking in gullies which have been so long persecuted, and we have no doubt but that parties will be organised, as the spring sets in, whose labors will soon obtain results of sufficient magnitude to secure the influx of a digging population which is all we now require to secure the full and perfect development of this important element of our national wealth. To the Directors of this New Company we look with much confidence. Upon their energy we mainly depend not only for the success of the enterprise under their immediate direction, but for the impetus which their success will give to the formation of other kindred Companies. Quartz-Crushing in Victoria just now is all the rage; and, whatever may ultimately be the superiority of the alluvial diggings in that Colony over ours, we have, at all events, every right to claim an equality with our neighbors so far as the wealth of our quartz is concerned. The ball is beginning to roll. It will be our own fault if it is permitted to stop. [24]

August 31 - September 5 Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company. REQUIRED a gentleman to perform the Office Duties of the above Company. He must be a competent book keeper and will be required to find security Salary for the present, at the rate of £200 per annum. Applications, accompanied by satisfactory testimonials, to be forwarded to the Chairman of Directors, at the Offices of the Company, No. 5 Elizabeth street, Hobart Town on or before WEDNESDAY, 7th September. Information relative to the duties, and amount of security, can be obtained of the Hon. Secretary. By order of the Directors, Geo. Morgan, Hon. Sec.[25]

September

September 2-7 Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company. THE DIRECTORS invite applications from gentlemen of the Legal Profession in Hobart Town, for the appointment of Solicitor to the above Company. The above to be addressed to the Chairman of Directors at the offices of the Company, No. 3, Elizabeth-street, on or before Wednesday, the 7th September, 1859. By Order of the Directors, GEORGE MORGAN, Hon. Sec.[26]

September 6-28 NOTICE TO SHAREHOLDERS. Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company: THE BOARD of DIRECTORS are prepared to receive applications for the unappropriated Shares in the above Company, the same to be addressed to the Secretary, marked "Application for Shares," at the offices of the Company, No. 3, Elizabeth-street, on or before THURSDAY, 15th instant. By order of the Directors, GEORGE MORGAN, Hon. Secretary. [28]

September 7 THE SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING AND MINING COMPANY.
The Shareholders of this Company will be glad to learn that the Directors have been indefatigable in their endeavors to bring their arrangements into working order. They have entered into a temporary engagement with Dr. Otway, the Metallurgist, who will at once proceed to Fingal to test the several claims of the Company. For this purpose, Clayton and Shuttleworth's portable testing machine, with a battery of three stampers, will be sent for immediately, and it is expected that the return from the Quartz tested will nearly cover the expense thus incurred. The Directors have also resolved upon offering a reward of one hundred pounds for the discovery of a payable reef within forty miles of Hobart Town. By an advertisement in another column it will be seen that the remaining shares are to be disposed of, the old shareholders being allowed a preference in their distribution. Every possible arrangement has been made to secure the successful operations of the Company, and the Directors are sanguine that their machinery will be procured and vigorously at work before Christmas. We are glad to find that the Directors are thus actively engaged in the important duties delegated to them; and we would strongly advise those who wish to have a finger in the golden pie so soon to be opened in Tasmania to avail themselves of the present opportunity and secure a few shares in this popular Company.[18]

September 8 QUARTZ COMPANY. —At a meeting of the Directors of the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company held yesterday Mr. Cartwright for some time past in the employ of the Gas Company was appointed Secretary to the Company and Mr. D'Arcy Haggitt Solicitor. [27]

September 9 - October 19 GOLD! GOLD! GOLD! £100 REWARD THE ABOVE SUM is offered for the discovery, within three months from this date, of a Payable Quartz Reef, available for the use of the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company (limited), either on Crown land or on land leased from the Crown, within 40 miles of Hobart Town. By order of Directors, GEORGE MORGAN, Hon. Sec. Sept. 8,1859.[6]

September 9 Required FOR the use of the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining. Company (limited), A SPRING DRAY or CART; also a Good Sound Staunch Draft HORSE and HARNESS. Tenders for the above will be received at the Company's Offices up to 12 o'clock, on Saturday next, the 10th inst. By order of Directors, George Morgan, Hon. Sec. 3 Elizabeth-street, 8th Sept. 1859.[30]

September 16 THE SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING AND MINING COMPANY. We have been requested to remind those of the shareholders who have not yet taken up their promisory notes that those notes are now lying overdue at the Bank of Van Diemen's Land. Several, even up to yesterday, were not aware that those notes were due, and we have no doubt that all who have not yet retired them are in the same position. We trust it will be only necessary to inform them of the circumstance in order to induce them to take up these bills without any further delay. [29]

September 20 At a meeting of the Directors of the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company, Mr. Cartright for some time past in the employ of the Gas Company, was appointed Secretary to the Company, and Mr. D'Arcy Haggitt Solicitor. The Company have engaged the services of Dr. Otway, as Metallurgist.[43]

September 22 SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING AND MINING COMPANY. THE Directors of the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company met yesterday and allotted additional shares up to the number of three thousand. In accordance with the resolution formerly arrived at the remaining one thousand shares will be thrown open to the public and will no doubt be readily taken up. The shareholders will be glad to learn that the machinery for testing the various reefs will in all probability arrive from Victoria by the next vessel and will be immediately forwarded to Fingal. Dr. OTWAY is still on the Gold Fields examining the reefs and collecting every information upon the subject so that when the machinery arrives there will not be a moment's delay in commencing practical operations. It is satisfactory to know that the Directors are acting with so much energy and promptitude. Before the spring is far advanced there will we feel convinced be considerable competition, and it is wise on their part, therefore, to make their claim, under the direction of Dr. OTWAY, without any delay.[32]

September 22 FINGAL. [From our own Correspondent.] Contrary to their usual practice, the Company did not wash off on Saturday, the result is therefore not known yet. The return from the alluvial diggings is 8 ozs. Dr. Otway has arrived, and immediately proceeds to the Black Boy for the purpose of testing the value of the various reefs there, and for selecting a spot for the S. T. Company upon which to place their machinery. Considerable interest will attach to the doctor's report, and the result will be anxiously looked for by all who are interested in this subject. Several claims on a new reef there were registered at the Commissioner's office yesterday. A party of prospectors are collecting quartz at the Ormley estate, a few miles from Avoca, where, from the appearance of the quartz and the minerals with which it is associated, there is every probability that it will be found to contain gold. I believe the Company do not intend to publish their returns for the future.[44]


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History

According to Robert Worley, who went on to become a director of the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing Company, a meeting was held on or about 1 July 1859 "by a few zealous friends, who thought that measures ought to be adopted by the middle classes to avail themselves of the advantages presented by the gold discoveries at Fingal; few, however, attended, and another meeting was held..."[1] This second meeting is likely to be the one held on 8 July 1859 "for the purpose of forming a Provisional Committee and transacting other business connected with the Company."[2] Worley presented a prospectus to the meeting which proposed £5 shares, which he contrasted with the £10 and even £100 shares he asserted were required by other companies forming at the time, but the feeling of the meeting was that insufficient notice had been provided, and the meeting adjourned to more widely publicise the venture, and to allow the details of the prospectus to be made public.[3] According to Worley, "a committee was appointed to re-consider, and, if possible, to improve the propositions previously adopted; since that meeting the Committee had met frequently and had agreed on the propositions which had been submitted to the public...""[1]

The subsequent meeting was advertised for at least four days[4] and received a resoundingly supportive editorial in The Hobart Town Daily Mercury the day before it was held.[5] As noted in the editorial, the advertisement stated the company was proposed "for the purpose of employing Machinery for Quartz Crushing or Alluvial Sinking in any part of Tasmania where reasonable prospects offer to repay the Company for their outlay."[4][5]

The editorial made much of the fact [@check] that gold-seeking companies had been set up by investors in the north of Tasmania, but little was being done by Hobartians:

Nearly all the energy now being displayed has been put forth by our brethren on the northern side of the Island. Whilst the Southern Capitalists are holding meetings and talking about the wisdom of forming Companies, our northern friends have shot a long way ahead. They have already formed a Company, engaged a scientific Manager from Victoria, ordered machinery, and, in a month or two, will be carrying their weekly return to the credit side of their ledger; whilst here, in the Capital of the Colony, nothing whatever has been done![5]

This sentiment is likely to have been a factor in the choice of name for the company. In fact, once the company was properly formed, advertisements were placed offering a £100 reward "for the discovery... of a Payable Quartz Reef... within 40 miles of Hobart Town."[6] As the company's stated purpose makes clear, however, they were realistically prepared to set to work "in any part of Tasmania".

The meeting re-convened on 15 July with the mayor of Hobart Town in the chair and "numerous... citizens and others" present. Worley outlined the background to the proposal, explained that

limited liability

[1]

Chronology

1858

July 6 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE. The monthly meeting of the Directors of the Chamber of Commerce was held yesterday afternoon in Royal Exchange Buildings, T.D. Chapman Esq., M.H.A. in the chair. When the general business was concluded the chairman read the Prospectus of the Tasmanian Quartz Crushing Company drawn up by Mr. Horace Bennett, and which had been brought under the notice of the Chamber by one of the Directors. After some discussion it was decided that this was not a matter on which it was desirable the Chamber of Commerce, as such, should take action, but that the best course would be for the proposer to bring the subject before a public meeting of the citizens.[45]

August 14 A NEW QUARTZ CRUSHING COMPANY. (From the Courier.) Our readers will find, in another column, an advertisement for a Manager of the Fingal Gold Quartz Crushing Company. —Whoever heard of that Company, before?" will, doubtless, be the exclamation of some of our southern "slow coaches." We have the "Pioneer Gold Mining and Prospecting Company," who contemplates find bushrangers as well as nuggets; the "League Mining Quartz Subscription Fund," and the Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company," all "dragging their slow length along," in a state of demi-torpidity; and a new confederation jumps into existence at a bound, with a spontaneous and precocious energy prophetic of a vigorous golden maturity. At Fingal too! How dare such a Company to spring up uninvited and unexpected in the provinces, whilst the business-like speculators of the Tasmanian metropolis are exercising such wholesome and cautious deliberation in making every step as sure as it is slow. Is the Fingal Company got up "in earnest" or as a satirical practical joke on the supineness of the "southerners?" There is no mistake about the Fingal Company being in earnest. A correspondent says:— "You will be glad to learn that at last our so-called gold-fields are likely ( as far as quartz crushing goes) to be thoroughly —in the case of Fingal —tested. Ten of us hereabouts have subscribed, (and paid the money into the Bank), £1000 to buy a proper steam apparatus for quartz crushing. The machinery is now on its way here; so while you Hobartonians are quarrying quartz, calling meetings, talking, and doing nothing else, —we are quietly doing the only thing that can set the matter at rest. If there is any gold in paying quantities at Fingal, we shall get it; if there is not, the thing will be set at rest forever." Now, this is something like doing business. "And paid the money into the bank!" This Company have the jingle of the precious metal to star with —gold will produce gold — if gold be there, and we congratulate our readers that so essentially practical and spirited a mode of going to work has been adopted by our northern neighbours. We learn that an application has been made to the Government for permission to work the Fingal reef for a year, free of Royalty, which has not been answered. This request, by men who thus spiritedly put down their money, to test an experiment in which the public are interested equally with themselves, will, we hope, be as promptly complied with. That such enterprises ought to receive every possible encouragement from the public, no man will venture to dispute; and it is doubtful whether any reward could be applied more judiciously, than that of giving up the Government share of a contingent profit, which can only be brought into existence at the sole labour and risk of those who ask for it. Not only ought this ad- vantage be given to the Fingal Company, but also to the other projected Companies, as soon as they can realize a similar sum. The success of either of these Companies would have the effect of greatly increasing the value of all property in Tasmania, and would give such an impetus to her onward progress, as she has never before experienced. We hope that our citizens will catch a spark of energy from their Fingal neighbours, and that something will be done to show that we have the enterprise amongst us, as we un- questionably have the means, —to work out with spirit and energy an experiment of which the risk of loss from failure is comparatively small, and by the success of which the prosperity of Tasmania would be so greatly accelerated and augmented. (From the Advertiser)[46]

1859

July

July 8 Quartz Crushing Company. —The Secretary of the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing Company has convened a meeting to be held at the mart of Messrs. Worley and Frodsham this afternoon at 3 o'clock prompt, for the purpose of forming a Provisional Committee and transacting other business connected with the Company.[47]

July 9-16 SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING COMPANY. A Public Meeting was held at the Mart of Messrs Worley and Frodsham yester- day afternoon for the purpose of forming a Provisional Committee and transacting other business. Mr. Morgan was appointed chairman. The chairman having read the circular convening the meeting, said he had heard with immense pleasure that a Company had been formed here instead of waiting for the inhabitants of Launceston to initiate. He believed the subject to be of the very greatest interest to the Colony and that the formation of such a Company would also greatly benefit themselves. Mr. Worley having briefly referred to the preliminary meeting previously holden would now lay before the meeting the draft of a Prospectus of the Company, under the above title, the basis, and salient points of which he said demanded their most serious and earnest attention. There was, he understood, a Company about to be formed here, the shares in which were £100 and another in which the Shares were reduced to £10. But it appeared that the bulk of the citizens were in favor of £5 shares which was proposed to be the amount per share in this Company. Mr. Worley then read the Prospectus explaining the principles upon which it was framed. The prospectus proposed that the capital should consist of £20,000 in 4,000 shares of £5 each, with a fee of 1s. per share to meet preliminary expenses, with a deposit of 2s. 6d. per share; the sum of 7s. 6d. to be paid within 30 days and a bill at three months given for 10s. By this means this would give the Company £4,000 to commence operations, but it was proposed that should a further call be found desirable a call of 10s. per share be made at intervals of not less than 60 days. Having detailed the manner of voting, providing for votes by proxies, it was proposed that a directory of 15 members be appointed in when the appointment of the officers should vest. Having explained the principal heads of the prospectus, and invited the opinion of the meeting upon them, Mr. Worley moved the adoption of the prospectus. Mr. John Symons seconded the motion. Mr. Hebblewhite was aware that the subject to consider which they had met was one of very great importance, and one in which many influential gentlemen were, to his knowledge, deeply interested. But as he did not think that parties had had sufficient notice, he would move as an amendment, that the meeting do adjourn, that notice might be more publicly given. Mr. Gellie seconded the amendment. He thought the question was one of very great importance, and he had no doubt that many parties, who were not aware that this meeting would be holden, would have been present had they received notice. Mr. Davies would support the amendment. He should, had not Mr. Hebblewhite's motion been brought forward, have moved an adjournment, in order that the prospectus might be constructed so as to show on the face of it the exact objects for which the Company was to be formed, that parties to whom the prospectus was submitted might at once see the objects the promoters had in view, and he would then do his best to assist them. Mr. Davies afterwards suggested that a Committee be appointed to draw up a pros- pectus, and to submit the same to a general meeting. Mr. Sandys moved that it is desirable that a Quartz-crushing Company be formed, and that a Committee, consisting of Messrs. Hebblewhite, Dickenson, Worley, Morgan, Gellie, Symons, Patterson, Da- vies, and J. Hall, do draw up a prospectus, to be submitted to a general meeting on Friday next. Mr. Hall, senior, seconded the motion, which was carried. Mr. Worley was appointed Convener, and after a vote of thanks to the Chair, the meeting, which was well attended, adjourned. [48]

July 13 Proposal to establish a QUARTZ CRUSHING & MINING COMPANY, Under the following title— THE SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING & MINING COMPANY, FOR the purpose of employing Machinery for Quartz Crushing or Alluvial Sinking in any part of Tasmania where reasonable prospects offer to repay the Company for their outlay. The accounts received from many individuals, whose testimony cannot be doubted, confirm most fully statements which have been made repeatedly as to the highly auriferous character of Fingal, and other places, which justify immediate action, with the view of turning to ac- count such invaluable treasures. Individual efforts, while applicable to alluvial diggings, which usually require but moderate means to effect important results, appear to be totally inadequate for carrying on with any prospect of success the more elaborate and expensive works of Quartz Crushing and Mining Operations upon a large scale. The necessity therefore arises for establishing a Company with sufficient capital in order that powerful Machinery may be purchased and applied to works of magnitude and difficulty beyond the scope of mere manual labour. By the instrumentality of a well-organized Company the means can be easily secured, the proprietary protected, and a reasonable assurance of success presented to reward enterprise aided by discretion. The promoters recommend to public consideration the following suggestions as a basis upon which a popular and soundly constituted Company should be formed.
Title-The Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company.
Capital-£20,000, in 4,000 Shares of £5 each.
Limited Liability.
Fee-One Shilling per Share to meet preliminary expenses.
Deposit-2s. 6d. per Share upon allotment.
7s. 6d. cash within 30 days.
10s 0d Promissory Note 3 months.
£1 0s. 0d.
Future calls not to exceed 10s per
Share at intervals of not less than 60 days.
SCALE OF VOTING.
2 Shares. 1 Vote
5 do .............. 2 do
10 do .............. 3 do
20 do .............. 4 do
30 do .............. 5 do
40 do .............. 6 do
55 do .............. 7 do
70 do .............. 8 do
85 do .............. 9 do
100 do ..............10 do
No Shareholder to have more than 10 votes whatever number of Shares he may hold. Voting by proxy allowed.
The Directory to consist of 15 members.
Five to be the quorum.
Qualification not loss than 5 Shares. When half the number of Shares are disposed of a meeting of Shareholders to be called, and a Directory to be appointed. The appointment of the Company's Officers to be vested in the Directory.
(Signed)
John Davies
John Dickenson
Alexander Gellie
J. C. Hall
William Hebblewhite
George Morgan
F. Paterson
John Symons
Robert Worley
Hobart Town,
July 12th 1859.
P.S.-A Public Meeting will be held at Basstian's, on Friday the 15th instant. The Chair to be taken at half-past 3 precisely.
His Worship the Mayor will preside.[49]

July 14 THE MERCURY. WITH WHICH ARE INCORPORATED THE "COLONIAL TIMES," THE "TASMANIAN DAILY NEWS" AND "DAILY COURIER." THURSDAY, JULY 14TH, 1859. WE are very glad to perceive that a number of our citizens have convened a public meeting to be held at the Bird-in- Hand, Argyle-street, to-morrow afternoon to consider a proposal, which will be found in another column, to establish a Quartz Crushing and Mining Company under the title of "The Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company." The object of the pro- posed Company is stated to be "to procure and employ Machinery for Quartz Crushing or alluvial sinking in any part of Tasmania where reasonable prospects offer to repay the Company for their outlay." The promoters of the scheme have recommended, and these recommendations will be taken into consideration tomorrow, that the Company shall have a capital of twenty thousand pounds in four thousand shares of five pounds each with limited liability. It is proposed to demand a fee of one shilling per share to meet preliminary expenses; also a deposit of two shillings and six- pence per share on allotment; seven shillings and sixpence per share in cash within thirty days; and ten shillings per share by a promissory note at three months. This would make one pound per share paid up. It is not intended that any additional call shall exceed ten shillings per share, whilst sixty days must elapse between each and every call. The scale of voting has been likewise announced in the advertisement, as well as certain proposals for the constitution of the Directory. To these we refer our readers. This important subject is beginning now to assume a new aspect, an aspect which renders it incumbent upon us as public journalists to call especial attention to it. Hitherto a want of faith in the existence of mineral wealth in Tasmania, partly justified, we admit, by the vexatious and disheartening disappointments to which we have been so repeatedly subjected, has been the chief if not the only obstacle in the way of its development. It does appear strange, and in the eyes of our neighbors it must appear unaccountable, that this gigantic element of prosperity should have existed, aye and knowingly existed, without having quickened the energy of our population or led to the adoption of such measures as would have secured to us all the amazing benefits which must have followed its development. Others estimate the wealth of our gold fields by our own conduct with regard to them. Our supineness and indifference is not charged by them upon our own characters as it ought to be, but it is attributed to the unexciting nature of the discoveries which have been made. They cannot understand how men in the known possession of great wealth could possibly resist the temptation of realizing that wealth; and they, therefore, as a more probable solution of the difficulty, content themselves with believing that our gold fields are all moonshine and our reputed wealth a fable. There is a far greater amount of wisdom in such an assumption as this than there is in the conduct which renders such an assumption natural and justifiable. If our neighbours have no faith in our gold fields it is mainly because we either have no faith in them ourselves or, what is to the same purpose, we act as if we had not. Our actions in the eyes of all energetic and business-like men are an emphatic contradiction of our assertions. No one will believe that the people of this Colony are so indolent and apathetic as they really are. Such conduct is so strange and inexplicable that men cannot under- stand it. If you talk to them about the wealth of Fingal they do not believe a word you say; and what is the reason for their unbelief? Simply this. They tell you that if there was gold in such quantities there the Tasmanians would not be such "darn'd idiots" as to neglect getting it for themselves. Like men of the world they refuse to believe any statements which are practically contradicted by the actions of those who make them. This practical unbelief, however, is now, we are happy to say, dying out. That we possess rich gold fields is now admitted, not only by a mere mental as- sent, but by the steps which are being taken to make our wealth available. And this is the new aspect which the subject presents. Nearly all the energy now being displayed has been put forth by our brethren on the northern side of the Island. Whilst the Southern Capitalists are holding meetings and talking about the wisdom of forming Companies, our northern friends have shot a long way ahead. They have already formed a Company, engaged a scientific Manager from Victoria, ordered machinery, and, in a month or two, will be carrying their weekly return to the credit side of their ledger; whilst here, in the Capital of the Colony, nothing whatever has been done! What must be the inevitable result of this if the same unworthy conduct is persisted in? Is it nothing that the whole of the benefits arising from this discovery should be adsorbed by Launceston? We are not jealous of our northern friends. Nothing would give us greater pleasure than to see them reap a rich harvest for the energy they are now displaying. They deserve it; and we have no manner of doubt but that it will be secured to them. But that does not exonerate the Capitalists on this side of the Island from the blame which rests upon them for their apathy. In this, as in everything else, the people of Launceston have outstripped us. All the advantages we might derive from our magnificent harbor and from our being the Capital of the Colony are being neutralised by our southern indolence and northern enter- prise. Not a single Company that we are aware of has been formed in Hobart Town for the purpose of realizing our wealth. Meetings have been held and proposals have been made and discussed, and there the matter has ended. Nothing, however, let it be remembered, can now stop the development of our gold fields. The attention they have attracted will secure them from neglect. Even if in the capital of the Colony not one man was found to assist in the work, still they must progress. The question is not now—have we a payable gold field? but, are we on the South side of the Island to derive any advantage from the discovery now that the discovery has been made? This is the question which must be decided and speedily. Every day of hesitation is a day lost. In a very brief period the Midland and the Northern companies will have their heavy machinery at work; and, although we believe our auriferous reefs to be inexhaustible, yet all the honor and all the advantage of developing these treasures will be exclusively confined to the other side of the Island. Hobart Town will never be mentioned in connexion with Fingal, and Hobart Town does not deserve that it should be. We are glad, however, to see that an attempt to form a Company on this side of the Island is now being made. If the proposals which have been placed before the public are adopted and carried out with energy and spirit we may yet be in time to commence operations coeval with our more spirited friends in the north. We look upon it that the reputation of the Capital is at stake in this matter; and, as our monied men appear to be too indolent to redeem that reputation, let us hope that it will be accomplished by the more humble and unassuming proprietory of the Southern Tasmanian Company. [50]

July 16 QUARTZ CRUSHING AND MINING COMPANY. Yesterday afternoon a numerous meet- ing of citizens and others took place at Mr. Basstian's, the Bird-in-Hand, Argyle- street, in order to establish a Quartz Crushing and Mining Company, as notified by advertisement, under the title of The Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company for the purpose of employing machinery for Quartz Crushing or Alluvial Sinking in any part of Tasmania where reasonable prospects offer to repay the Company for their outlay. The meeting was called, for half-past 3, and it was announced that the Mayor would preside, and accordingly, on the motion of Mr. Worley seconded by Mr. Davies, His Worship was voted to the chair. The Chairman having adverted to the advertisement calling the meeting, said the subject was one of great importance, and the discoveries at Fingal led the gentlemen whose names he had read to call the meeting, and by that they had incurred a great responsibility. He would leave to them the details of the business, and if the meeting approved of their proposals a Provisional Committee would be appointed to organize and carry out the objects of the meeting. Mr. Worley said it now devolved upon him to place the objects of the Company plainly before the meeting. About a fortnight ago a meeting was called by a few zealous friends, who thought that measures ought to be adopted by the middle classes to avail themselves of the advantages presented by the gold discoveries at Fingal; few, however, attended, and another meeting was held at which a committee was appointed to re-consider, and, if possible, to improve the propositions previously adopted ; since that meeting the Committee had met frequently and had agreed on the propositions which had been submitted to the public ; they do not, however, pledge themselves to those proposals, although they believe that they are such as to ensure the safety and success of the Company. He thought that all would agree that the time had come when they must do something, and the question was, what was that something. The formation of a company had been suggested, and it was for the meeting now to consider and decide whether a company should be formed, and to sanction or otherwise the mode proposed for carrying out its objects. It would be strange if, with the experience of the present day, they should not be enabled to originate something better than had been formed in the olden time; they had a limited liability for their protection, and although no law had actually passed, he was enabled to say that an Act would be passed in the next session to secure this benefit for the commercial community. And, perhaps, it would be better for him to explain the meaning of limited liability; it meant, then, that no shareholder could be called upon under any circumstances to pay more than 25 per cent above the amount of his share. They would thus see how important such a protection would be to persons of limited means, who would know exactly how much they would have to pay even under the most adverse circumstances. Mr. Worley now proceeded to explain the other items in the prospectus, reading the document at length, and leaving it to the meeting to approve of or modify any portion, or the whole; he concluded by moving that the proposals laid before the meeting be ap- proved of. Mr. J. Symons seconded. Mr. J. Davies, as one of the committee, felt it incumbent upon him to offer a few remarks upon one or two points which had been considered in committee, but which had been omitted, no doubt, in- advertently. In rising to support the resolution which had been proposed, he would take leave to point out that with regard to the important appointment of a Field Officer, or General Manager, that would be within the province of the Directory; and for the information of the gentlemen who might compose it, he would state that he conscientiously believed no gentleman on this side of the Straits was properly qualified for that office ; he did not say this with any intention of giving offence to any one, nor did he think that any gentleman in this Colony would offer to undertake the duties. When he was in Melbourne a few days ago he made many enquiries relative to Quartz Crushing, and found that none but practical and experienced men were fit for the work; even a man experienced in California was not suited for Victoria. He came over with Mr. Nevins, one of the ablest men in the latter Colony, and from him he derived the information which he should now impart to the meeting. He assured him that even with regard to the appointment of Mr. Gould, the Government Geologist, his theoretical knowledge was not worth a straw in Tasmania or Victoria, and it was a well-authenticated fact amongst scientific men that theoretical knowledge with respect to these colonies was altogether valueless, when put in competition, to use Mr. Nevins' own words, with the experience of the pick and shovel. (Cheers.) He, Mr. Nevins, also stated that all the geological theories propounded by scientific writers with regard to the Quartz Reefs had been entirely upset by the practical working in Victoria; he, Mr. Davies, did not understand this, but he mentioned the fact to show that practical men, and practical men only, could efficiently and successfully carry out the objects of the Company. With respect to the wide scope of the Prospectus, they would perceive that the operations of the Company would not be confined to Fingal, (cheers,) and it was probable from the various discoveries that were daily reaching us that in the coming spring a wide scope would be open to the Company. He should pro- pose, therefore, that the Company should at once go vigorously to work; the spring would soon arrive, and the appointment of the various officers, with the establishment of other necessary preliminaries, would occupy about three months, and it was highly desirable that the Company should be in full and active operation before the summer was on the wane. These were the only matters with which he should trouble the meeting, with one exception, and he wished to throw out a hint to those who would have the management of affairs. The formation of Quartz Crushing Machines was so simple that there was no necessity to go abroad for their construction, and if effected here a very great advantage would be gained. (Applause.) We were a very poor Colony, indeed, if machines of this description could not be manufactured here He was told they could be made in this city, and he had no hesitation in saying that it was the duty of the Directory so to have them made if they could be manufactured equally well as in other places. (Renewed cheers,) Mr. Davies now referred to the Prospectus, which he thought had been prepared on a liberal basis, and explained further the effect of limited liability; if a Company be found to-day, and the capital paid up, and then by adverse circum- stances, as mismanagement or otherwise, the funds became exhausted, each share- holder would be simply liable to 25 per cent. on the amount of his shares for the debt incurred; thus it was important to the laborer and artisan clearly to under- stand, that under any adverse circum- stances he would only be liable to pay £6 5s. for his £5 share; it was better, Mr. Davies said, to take the bull by the horns in matters of this kind, and state the fact fairly at once. He had now simply to support the resolution, believing as he did that the Company would be successful, and that it would take a good slice from the good things that were offered to them. He knew from communication with mercantile men that speculators in Victoria were only waiting to take advantage of the supineness of others, and he had no hesitation in stating that when Mr. Nevins's report of the auriferous wealth of Fingal reached Victoria, they would find that strangers would flock to this Colony, and, unless prepared to prevent it, deprive them of that to which they were fairly and justly entitled. (Cheers.) The resolution was put from the chair and carried unanimously. Mr. J. A. Thomson moved that the following names be added to the Provisional Committee:—Dr. Doughty, Dr. Stewart, Messrs. C. O. Atkins, Belbin, and J. E. Risby. Mr. Hebblewhite in seconding the motion wished to offer a remark on an idea that had gone abroad, to the effect that the original Committee would have the handling of the funds of the Company, and the whole responsibility; he wished it to be understood that the Committee of which he was a member had been appointed merely to prepare preliminaries, and that had they not have been re-elected their functions would have ceased. The motion was put and carried. Mr. Worley moved, and Mr. Symons seconded: That persons to whom shares are allotted be required to pay the amount of the first instalment of 2s. 6d. into the Van Diemen's Land Bank, to the credit of the Company, and that parties failing to pay within the time fixed forfeit their shares, which shall revert to the Company. The motion was carried. It was then moved, seconded, and carried unanimously that the Mayor be appointed Provisional Treasurer for the Company. His Worship intimated his willingness to accept the office. A vote of thanks was passed to the Chairman, and the meeting separated. A share list was opened in the room, and upwards of 400 shares were taken, and the deposit paid. [51]

July 16-26 THE NEW GOLD COMPANY. IN another column will be found a report of the meeting held yesterday afternoon at the Bird-in-Hand, Argyle-street, to con- sider certain proposals for the formation of a new Company to be styled the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company. The meeting was as we expected one of the most numerous and influential we have seen assembled for some time. One feeling animated all who were present; and we have no doubt whatever but that the Company now formed will prove by its energy that we are not altogether indifferent on this side of the is- land to the advantages to be derived from the development of our Gold Fields. [52]

July 18-28 Proposal to establish a QUARTZ CRUSHING & MINING COMPANY, Under the following title— THE SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING & MINING COMPANY FOR the purpose of employing Machinery for Quartz Crushing or Alluvial Sinking in any part of Tasmania where reasonable prospects offer to repay the Company for their outlay. The accounts received from many individuals, whose testimony cannot he doubted, confirm most fully statements which have been made repeatedly as to the highly auriferous character of Fingal, and other places, which justify immediate action, with the view of turning to ac- count such invaluable treasures. Individual efforts, while applicable to alluvial diggings, which usually require but moderate means to effect important results, appear to be totally inadequate for carrying on with any prospect of success the more elaborate and expensive works of Quartz Crushing and Mining Operations upon a large scale. The necessity therefore arises for establishing a Company with sufficient capital in order that powerful Machinery may be purchased and applied to works of magnitude, and difficulty beyond the scope of mere manual labour. By the instrumentality of a well-organized Company the means can be easily secured, the proprietary protected, and a reasonable assurance of success presented to reward enterprise aided by discretion. The promoters recommend to public consideration the following suggestions as a basis upon which a popular and soundly constituted Company should be formed.
Title —The Southern Tasmanian Quartz
Crushing and Mining Company.
Capital— £20,000, in 4,000 Shares of £5 each.
Limited Liability.
Fee— One Shilling per Share to meet preliminary expenses.
Deposit-2s. 6d. per Share, upon allotment.
7s. 6d. cash within 30 days.
10s 0d Promissory Note 3 months.
£1 0s. 0d.
Future calls not to exceed 10s per
Share at intervals of not less than 60 days.
SCALE of VOTING.
2 Shares. 1 Vote
5 do ........ 2 do
10 do ........ 3 do
20 do ........ 4 do
30 do ........ 5 do
40 do ........ 6 do
55 do ........ 7 do
70 do ........ 8 do
85 do ........ 9 do
100 do ........10 do
No Shareholder to have more than 10 votes whatever number of Shares he may hold. Voting by proxy allowed. The Directory to consist of 15 members. Five to be the quorum. Qualification not less than 5 Shares. When half the number of Shares are disposed of a meeting of Shareholders to be called, and a Directory to be appointed. The appointment of the Company's Officers to be vested in the Directory. At a Public Meeting held at Basstian's, July 15th, D. Lewis, Esq., Mayor, in the chair, the above scheme was unanimously approved of, and a Provisional Committee appointed to carry it into effect. Forms of application for Shares may be had from any of the undersigned, and all inquiries will be answered by Mr. Worley, at the Mart, Elizabeth-street.
(Signed)
C. O. Atkins, Murray-street.
W. Belbin, New Wharf. .
J. Davies, Mercury Office.
J. Dickenson, Trafalgar Place.
Dr Doughty. Elizabeth-street.
A. Gellie, Davey-street.
N. Gerrand, Liverpool-street.
J. C. Hall, Advertiser Office.
W. Hebblewhite, Franklin Wharf.
W. Johnston, Patrick-street.
G. Morgan, Liverpool-street.
F. Paterson, Liverpool-street.
J. E. Risby, Battery Point.
W. R. Stewart, Campbell-street.
J. Symons, Fitzroy Crescent.
R. Worley, Elizabeth-street.
G. Rolwegan, Collins-street,
Provisional Committee.
R. Jarman, 46, Murray-street,
Provisional Secretary.
The Committee desire to enlist the hearty co-operation of their fellow-citizens in a movement which will in all probability affect their material interests in a very important degree. The scheme proposed has been conceived with the utmost care, and is based upon that safe and equitable principle, limited liability, which will protect subscribers from any possibility of loss exceeding 25 per cent. beyond the amount of their shares. That there may be no misunderstanding in a matter of such moment, the Commit- tee wish to state, for the information of those who may not be generally informed upon the subject, that a Limited Liability Act has been printed, and will be introduced into Parliament in the following Session. Should any thing occur in the chapter of accidents to prevent the passing of the said Act, or any other of a similar character, the promoters of the S.T.Q. C. & M. Company pledge themselves to bring in a Special Act, or relinquish the project. [53]

July 19 THE SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING AND MINING COMPANY. We are glad to learn that a large number of Shares in this Company has already been taken. We have been told that several citizens have refused, or manifested a reluctance, to join in this enterprise from doubts as to the eligibility of some of those now acting as a Provisional Committee to have the management of launching a Company of so much magnitude and importance. But this is very absurd. The gentlemen who are now acting as a Committee are only, as their name implies, a "Provisional" Committee. So soon as the proportion of shares named in the prospectus has been taken, the Shareholders will be called upon to elect their Manager, Secretary, and Directors. It will be in their own power then to elect whom they please; not one of those now acting as a Provisional Committee need of necessity be elected. Indeed if the Shareholders have not confidence in them they assuredly will not be. For us to refuse, therefore, to subscribe to the undertaking simply because one or two of these gentlemen do not, in our opinion, possess the necessary qualifications for successfully carrying out the objects of the Company after it has been formed would be to refuse on grounds which will never probably exist; or which certainly will not exist without the concurrence of a majority of the Shareholders. We published yesterday from the columns of a northern Contemporary, a statement shewing how profitable this and all similar enterprises must prove; and it would indeed be a great pity to allow our embryo Company to languish for want of public support merely because one or two parties have been connected with the preliminary arrangements in whom we have no confidence. The citizens will have the election of their own officers in their own hands; and we would earnestly remind them that if they permit the present attempt to miscarry it will probably be a long time before another chance will be afforded them. [54]

July 23 ANOTHER PROSPECTIVE GOLD COMPANY. ARRANGEMENTS have been made by some influential citizens for the formation of another Quartz Crushing Company, dependent, however, upon certain contingents. The matter originated almost accidentally. A gentleman named MILLIKEN having acquired a competency by gold digging in Victoria has visited this Colony previous to his departure to Britain; calling at the office of Mr. Charles BUTLER, the solicitor, he was shown some quartz specimens from Fingal, which he at once pronounced of the right sort. This [unintelligible] known to [unintelligible] and about thirty met yesterday at Mr. BUTLER'S, when it was decided that Mr. MILLIKEN should forthwith proceed to Fingal, accompanied by Mr. SPONG, the Surveyor, to prospect for a payable reef, the amount for the necessary expenses being subscribed on the spot. If these gentlemen succeed in discovering an available reef, measures will be promptly taken to organize another Quartz Crushing Company; of the finding, not only of one, but of several reefs there can be no doubt, and we may, consequently. consider the new Company as virtually formed.[55]

July 26 HOBART TOWN. The Mercury states that upwards of twelve hundred shares have been taken in the Quartz-Crushing Company, and that arrangements have been made by some influential citizens for the formation of another company. A gentleman named Milliken having acquired a competency by gold digging in Victoria, has visited this colony previous to his departure to Britain; calling at the office of Mr. Charles Butler, the solicitor, he was shown some quartz specimens from Fingal, which he at once pronounced of the right sort. Thirty gentlemen met yesterday at Mr. Butler's, when it was decided that Mr. Milliken should forthwith proceed to Fingal, accompanied by Mr. Spong, the surveyor, to prospect for a payable reef, the amount for the necessary expenses being subscribed on the spot. [56]

July 26 SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING AND MINING COMPANY. The Provisional Committee met yesterday, when they were favored with the attendance of Mr. Milliken whose advice and suggestions were extremely valuable, so much so, indeed, as to induce the Committee to assume the responsibility of despatching accredited agents to Fingal in Company with that gentleman to select and put in a claim for quartz reefs on behalf of the Company. It was certainly an oversight that this measure was not proposed at the late meeting, but as the Committee have acted in this manner solely with a view to expedite and enhance the interests of the shareholders, the proceeding will, no doubt, be sanctioned by them; should this, however, not be the case the Committee are prepared to liquidate the expenses of the agency. We think the Committee are deserving of praise for acting thus energetically; it evinces on their part an anxious interest in behalf of the shareholders, and a desire to adopt the best means to promote their views and advantages. The shares, we are happy to say, are being quickly taken up, and but a short time can elapse be- fore the Company is placed in tangible working order. The activity of the Committee affords an ample guarantee for future success, and we have not the slightest doubt, but that our Quartz Crushing and Mining Company will shortly prove the most prosperous project of the day.[57]

July 28 THE SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING COMPANY. The Provisional Committee met yesterday afternoon, when Messrs. JOHN DAVIES, WILLIAM HEBBLEWHITE, ROBERT WORLEY, C. Q. ATKINS, and Dr. DOUGHTY, were elected as a Sub- Committee to make the necessary preliminary arrangements for the election of Directors. Two thousand and fifty shares have been applied for. The Committee have resolved to allot three thousand reserving one thousand to hand over to the Directors with the understanding that the original Shareholders should be entitled to a priority in any future allotment of shares.[58]

July 30 QUARTZ CRUSHING AND MINING COMPANY. The Provisional Committee met yesterday and resolved that their operations should be closed at half-past three o'clock this afternoon; up to this time, however, shares will be allotted as usual, but after this those for which application have been made will be handed over to the Directory when elected. We would remind intending shareholders that if their shares be not taken to-day they can take no part in the Election of the Directors. We are enabled to state, on the authority of the Premier, that a Bill to declare a Limited Liability in certain Joint Stock Companies will be introduced in the forthcoming Session of Parliament, and that the measure will have especial applicability to Quartz Crushing and Gold Mining Companies at Fingal.[59]

July 28 - August 5 Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company, July 27th, 1859. AT a SPECIAL GENEBAL MEETING of the Provisional Committee held this day, it was unanimously re- solved: "That as upwards of 2000 Shares have been applied for and the fees paid, this Committee take immediate steps to arrange for a General Meeting of Share- holders to elect 15 Directors, and also that the full number of Shares already applied for be allotted to each applicant." The Provisional Committee will continue to receive applications for Shares, but will only allot to the extent of another 1000, as they intend to place the remainder at the disposal of the future Directory. By order of the Provisional Committee, RICHARD JARMAN, Provisional Secretary. [60]

August

August 2 – 6 Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company. Tico Thousand Six Hundred Shares have been applied for and the Pees Paid. THE Provisional Committee have there- fore resolved to allot the said Shares to the respective parties, who will be immediately instructed as to the precise mode in which the deposits &c. must be paid. The Directory will have to be elected from the Subscribers of the said 2G00 Shares, who will be informed in due course of every particular relating to the Election. No further application for Shares received until the Directory is appointed. ROBERT WOBLEY, Chairman to Provisional Committee, August 1st, 1850. [61]

August 5 - 8 THE SUBSCRIBERS TO THE SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING & MINING COMPANY, ARE INFORMED that the deposits &c, directed to be paid into the Van Diemen's Land Bank, will be received by the Provisional Treasurer, David Lewis, Esq., at the premises of Messrs. R. Lewis & Sons, Collins-street, between the hours of 10 and 1, and 2 and 4. By order of the Committee, ROBEBT WORLEY, Chairman. Hobart Town, August 4th, 1859. [62]

August 8 Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company. THE TIME for PAYMENT of the FIRST DEPOSITS is extended from MONDAY, the 8lh, to WEDNES- DAY, the 10th of August. Payment to be made to the Provisional Treasurer, D. Lewis, Esq., at the premises of Messrs. E. Lewis & Sons, Collins-street, between the hours of 10 and 1, and 2 and 4. Information relative to the Election of Directors, will be duly forwarded to the Shareholders. By order of the Provisional Committee, RICHARD JARMAN Provisional Secretary. Hobart Town, August 6th, 1859. [63]

August 11 In addition to the Launceston Company, and to others now being formed, we have the Southern Tasmanian Quartz-crushing and Mining Company. This Company has been formed upon a very popular basis. It consists of four thousand shares at five pounds per share—Limited Liability; and the payments are spread over a period of some months so as to enable small capitalists to embark in the enter- prise. Upwards of two thousand six hundred shares have already been apportioned, and so soon as the directors have been elected and officers appointed, active steps will be taken to procure the necessary machinery. A gentleman has been despatched to prospect the country near Fingal for a new reef; and in the meantime numbers of the Shareholders have forwarded their claims for registration. From the known energy of character of many of those who have taken the lead in bringing this company into existence the proprietary seem convinced that it will be a most and a deservedly successful enterprise. In fact all are preparing for active operations in the spring ; operations, which, we feel more and more persuaded, are destined by their results to lift Tasmania from her hitherto neglected and despised position into one of considerable importance amongst the Australias. [64]

August 11 Of great importance to Hobart Town, and, by consequence, to the Colony, is the formation of a Quartz-Crushing and Mining Company, the first meeting of which took place at the Bird-in- Hand, on the 15th ult., His Worship the Mayor taking the Chair. The meeting, which was numerously and influentially attended, was ani- mated by one feeling in favor or the project, and as it has been formed with a view to the interests of the middle classes, there can be no doubt but that it will be ultimately and pros- perously successful. The particulars of both these events will be found in another place.[65]

August 17-24 Southern Tasmanian Quartz-Crushing and Mining Company. ELECTION OF DIRECTORS. A PUBLIC MEETING will be held at Basstian's, " Bird-in-Hand," Argyle-street, on WEDNESDAY, 24th August, 1859, at 1 o'clock precisely, to receive the report of the Provisional Committee, to appoint Scrutineers, and elect fifteen Directors. Should any Shareholder not have received the Circular containing a list of those qualified for Directors which has been forwarded per post, he can obtain the same upon application to me. ROBERT WORLEY, Chairman of the Provisional Committee. *The name of Mr. H. Boyes was accidentally omitted from the list of persons qualified for Directors.[66]

August 23 Southern Tasmanian Quartz-Crushing and Mining Company. A PUBLIC MEETING of the SHAREHOLDERS will be held at Basstian's "Bird-in-Hand," Argyle- street, on WEDNESDAY, August 24th, 1859, at one o'clock precisely, "To receive the report of the Provisional Committee, appoint Scrutineers, and elect Fifteen Directors." The Polling will commence at 2, and conclude at 4 o'clock. The following qualified Shareholders have been duly nominated and consent to serve if elected:
Andrews, W. F. J.
Arnold, George
Atkins, C. O.
Barclay, David
Bastian, Christopher
Beaumont, W. G.
Bolbin, William
Boyall, W. C.
Boys, William
Burgess, Murray
Buller, Charles
Chipman, H. J.
Cherry, George
Cleburne. Richard
Coram, J. T.
Cox, H. T. C.
Davies, John
Dickenson, John
Doughty, John
Dowdell. Charles
Drake. F. J.
Dunkley, David
Edwards, R. T.
Fisher, Thomas
Franklin. R. T.
Fryer, J. R.
Gerrand, Nicholas
Hall, J C.
Hamilton, William
Hebblewhite, William
Hood, R.L.
Hornby, William
Johnston, William
Lees, F,R,
Lewis, David
M'Meekan, Anthony
McGrath, John
Middleton. M.A.G.
Milward, John
Morgan, George
Newman, Richard
Overell, J.J.
Park, James
Parker, Henry
Paterson, Frederick
Paterson, Thomas
Pettard, William
Piguenit, F,L,
Purkiss, William
Risby, J.E.
Robb, William
Roberts, J.G.
Rolwegan, George
Scott, Hopetown
Scott, Sandford
Sly, James
Smith, W. C, D,
Solomon, J. Church-street
Solomon, J. Macquarie-street
Stewart, W. R.
Symons, John
Thomas, Frederick
Thomson, J. A.
Tolman, J. C.
Wescott, W. F. J.
Wilson, J. M.
Wimbush, Thomas
Worley, Robert
SCALE OF VOTING.
2 Shares. 1 Vote
5 do .............. 2 do
10 do .............. 3 do
20 do .............. 4 do
30 do .............. 5 do
40 do .............. 6 do
55 do .............. 7 do
70 do .............. 8 do
85 do .............. 9 do
100 do ..............10 do
Polling Papers will be supplied at the meeting, and printed proxies may be obtained of the Chairman of the Provisional Committee. Fifteen persons must be voted for and their names indicated by a X and any polling paper having more or less than 15 names marked, will be rejected. ROBERT WORLEY, Chairman. Elizabeth-street, August 20th, 1859.[67]

August 22 THE SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING AND MINING COMPANY. FRIDAY was the last day for nominating parties for the responsible office of Di- rectors to the New Company, and the names of those who have been proposed will be found in another column. From these gentlemen the Shareholders will have no difficulty in selecting fifteen possessed of energy and business habits to manage the affairs of this new and promising enterprise. Much will depend upon the manner in which the proprietary discharge this highly important duty. If the Company is to be, as it was originally intended to be, a Tradesmen's Company, the Directors should be selected from amongst that class; they should be men in whom the shareholders have confidence; men whose sympathies are in harmony with their own. Because a man is wealthy that is no reason why he should be a thoroughly practical man of business. It is the assistance of this latter class which must be secured if it is wished that the Company should be prosperous, and we shall be grievously disappointed, there- fore, should we find that the advantage of having such men has been sacrificed either to private friendship or to wealth. The election will take place at the Bird-in- Hand, Argyle-street, on Wednesday next, at one o'clock, at which time it is to be hoped the Shareholders will attend and vote for those gentlemen whom they may deem best qualified for carrying out successfully the objects for which the Company has been formed. [68]

August 24 SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ-CRUSHING AND MINING COMPANY. We would remind the Shareholders of this promising Company that they will be called upon this day to elect fifteen of their own number to form a Directory for the management of their affairs. That the future prosperity of this enterprise will mainly depend upon the character and business habits of those who may be elected no one doubts; and we do not deny, therefore, that we are somewhat solicitous as to the result of this day's proceedings. We have already stated our opinion as to the men whose claims should be considered paramount. We do not want men of wealth in the Directory so much as men of untiring energy, and these should be selected, as far as practicable, from the class to which a large majority of the proprietors belong. However, we will not doubt but that every Shareholder will take a deep interest in the success of the Quartz- Crushing and Mining Company; and this is by far the best guarantee we can possibly have for the judicious exercise of his privileges. The voting, which will be by ballot, will commence at the "Bird-in-Hand," Argyle street, at one o'clock and close at 4 o'clock this afternoon. [69]

August 25 SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING AND MINING COMPANY. A Public Meeting of the Shareholders was holden at Mr. Basstian's, Bird-in- hand, Argyle-street, at one o'clock yesterday, "to receive the Report of the Provisional Committee, appoint scrutineers, and elect Fifteen Directors." The Meeting which had caused much interest from the rapidity with which the large number of shares for issue had been taken up, and the important objects which the Company have in view, was very largely attended. Among those present, were the Right Worshipful the Mayor, (David Lewis Esq.,) and Messrs. W. G. Beaumont, Dr. Doughty, J. A. Thompson. R. T. C. Yates, C. Basstian, Belbin, Edwards, Risby. Rolwegan, J. Symons, Cherry, R. L. Hood, J. Davies, T. J. Crouch, Dickenson, Cox, Seabrook, Petterd, Franklin, Sly, Andrews, Smith, Gellie, Minnis, Wright, Dunkley, C. Hall, sen. G. Morgan, J. Hall, C. Hall jun., Watson, &c. His Worship the Mayor, was called to the Chair by acclamation. The Chairman said he had again the pleasure to preside over a meeting of much importance, and without detaining the members present from proceeding with the business for which they had been convened, would call upon Mr. Worley to read the Report of the Provisional Committee, and the Shareholders could then proceed to the election of Scrutineers and Directors. Mr. Worley, Chairman of the Committee, then read the report. On the motion of Mr. Hebblewhite, seconded by Mr. Beaumont, the report was received and unanimously adopted. A vote of thanks was also passed by the shareholders to the secretary and other gentlemen forming the Provisional Committee, for the exceedingly clever manner in which they had performed the affairs of the Company. Mr. Worley, in acknowledgment, said the approval of the shareholders was a sufficient award to the Committee for their exertions, and that he trusted the success which had hitherto accompanied them would be a fair guarantee for the future prosperity of the Company, and he hoped they would now elect such officers as would carry out their enterprise to a happy conclusion. The meeting then proceeded to the first business of the day, and after the names of many of the shareholders had been mentioned, on the motion of Mr. Baastian, seconded by Mr. Worley, the following were appointed Scrutineers:— Messrs. Yates, Watson, Lovett, Gellie, Fleming, and Saunders. Mr. Andrews, before they proceeded to the election of Directors, said they should settle the principles upon which the Company should act. By one of the rules in the prospectus it was laid down that if a person did not vote for the whole number of fifteen Directors, that voter should be disfranchised. To this rule he strongly objected, on the ground that each share- holder had a constitutional right to vote for the whole, or for any part of the whole number. Again, he was of opinion that voting by proxies was objectionable, and contended that this system was unjust and unsafe, and that the moment a party gave his proxy to another shareholder, that party had not only disfranchised himself, but had also done an injury to the other members by thus giving an irresponsible power to an individual who might, could, and probably would exercise it in a manner injurious to the interests of the Company. He, therefore, gave notice that at the next general meeting he should give notice that no more proxies be held. Mr. Basstian having mentioned that there was an impression abroad that one gentleman had been canvassing for proxies of which he held a great number, Mr. Hebblewhite moved and Mr. Dickenson seconded that Mr. Basstian be called upon by the meeting to name. Mr. Morgan, Mr. J. Symons, and many others objected to this being done, unless bona fide proof could be given that the party alluded to had actually canvassed. Other members expressed their opinion that the canvassing for proxies was perfectly legitimate and that it was not right to call upon Mr. Basstian to name. Mr. Bass- tian was in the hands of the meeting, but he had only mentioned the rumor, as he considered it was his duty to do so, being of opinion that if a rumor got abroad that an undue influence had been made to obtain votes it would prove prejudicial to the Company. The conversation as to the propriety of calling for the name of the party referred to was still continuing, when Mr. Andrews remarked that his observations had been made in opposition to the principle of voting by proxies and not with reference to this meeting or to any particular person. Mr. Davies would occupy the time of the meeting for a few minutes simply to set the matter at rest. It was the rule in almost every joint stock company in England that proxies should be issued. He held some himself from his own daughter as he had a perfect right to do, and he thought the same principle which was observed in every other place with regard to proxies should be observed here. The rule allowing the issue of proxies had been allowed by the shareholders adopting the prospectus, and if there had been any objection to that rule, the time to have brought it forward was when the pros- pectus was submitted to them, and then it could have been amended in that particular. But the body of the members had confirmed the report recommending that proxies be issued, and it appeared to him that this meeting emanating as it did from the original meeting could not discuss it at the present moment. Mr. Andrews had given notice of his intention to bring the question forward some weeks hence which would be the proper time to alter any rule which they might think injurious to the interests of the Company, but to introduce the question now was only calculated to raise a feeling detrimental to their general good, and might probably be the precursor of a very considerable deal of altercation and dissension, which he was glad to say had not existed at the commencement of the Company. There could be no doubt that any member aspiring to the office of Director could exercise his right of obtaining proxies, nor was there anything dishonest in that, but whether it was in good taste to do so he was not prepared to say; but as that right had been conceded it could not be disputed now. Mr. Davies then explained that the rule was settled in committee that a ballot paper should be void if it did not contain the names of the whole fifteen, and that it was introduced on his own suggestion to prevent jobbery and to make every one vote. Mr. Yates, after a few further observations had been made as to whether voting by proxy would or would not conduce to the benefit of the society, moved as an amendment of the motion that Mr. Bass- tian be called to name —that the meeting proceed to the election of directors. Mr. J. Hall wished to move that the Directors be called upon to dispose of no more shares, without first calling a special meeting, but withdrew it on being in- formed that it could not be discussed now, intimating his intention of bringing the subject forward at the next general meeting. Mr. Basstian suggested as there were, as he was informed, a large number of proxies in the room, that the meeting be adjourned for a week. (No, no.) Mr. J. A. Thomson had met a gentle- man who told him he could not attend the meeting, and had given him his proxy, but he (Mr. Thomson) had heard that one gentleman in the room had fifty or sixty proxies in his pocket, but as it would be unjust to pass a vote at this meeting that there should be no proxies, he agreed that the meeting should be postponed. Mr. Worley understood from some re- marks which had fallen, that he was the gentleman referred to (Mr. Thompson answered in the affirmative). Well, he had as many as six, not sixty, in his pocket, and he supposed they were sent to him because the parties who entrusted them to him, knew he took a deep interest in the Company. The conversation then dropped, and the election of fifteen directors by ballot was proceeded with. After eight hours scrutiny the Scruti neers returned at half-past 12 o'clock, the following list which the Mayor declared duly elected
DIRECTORS:—
D. Lewis ... ... ... ... 626
J. Symons ... ... ... 352
J. Doughty ... ... ... 329
C. O. Atkins . ... ... 319
R.T.Edwards ... ... 314
J. M. Wilson ... ... 312
J. C. Hall .... ... ... 309
W. Hebblewhite 301
R. Worley .. ... ... 299
J. Davies .. ... ... 292
G. Morgan .... ... 259
C. Basstian ... ... 258
G. Rolwegan ... 258
J. E. Risby ... ... 222
D. Barclay ... ... 221[70]

August 25 SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING COMPANY. The strong interest taken by the Share- holders in the progress of the Southern Tasmanian Quartz-Crushing and Mining Company is the best guarantee we could possibly have for its future success. Every one who attended the meeting yesterday, and, as will be seen by the report in another column, the meeting was a very large one, spoke and acted with earnestness. Not a doubt was expressed as to the ultimate success of the enterprise. That the Company would be most successful if judiciously and energetically conducted was freely admitted; and we are quite willing to believe that any little acerbity manifested on this occasion arose solely from the earnest desire of those who indulged in it to secure this great object. We all know how suspicious men are sometimes apt to be in matters of this kind, and it would have been surprising had the launching of a Company formed for so exciting an object as that of gold-finding been exempt from this almost universal rule. Had this feeling been absent we should have doubted whether the enterprise really commanded the sympathy of the public. The Shareholders are undoubtedly under a deep obligation to the Provisional Committee for the practical and business- like manner in which they have brought the Company up to its present satisfactory position. Their important duties have been discharged in a manner which reflects credit upon themselves and which is likely to prove beneficial to the Company. All the preliminary matters have been most successfully arranged. The vessel has been built and launched. All admire her model, and wait now with considerable anxiety to see the amount of skill the new Directory will display in rigging and fitting her out for sea. Every day brings us additional cheering intelligence with regard to the undoubted wealth of our gold fields. The large in- crease in the weekly return obtained from the Midland Company's machine during the past week, notwithstanding its imperfection and the silence of its stampers, has awakened more than ordinary excitement. In another column will be found also the weekly Official Report of the Commissioner of the Gold Fields, a Report which no one can read without participating in the confidence it breathes as to the future prospects of the Colony. On the Northern side of the Island additional intelligence has been obtained, intelligence which, if reliable, will remove all doubt as to the highly auriferous character of the country along the banks of the River Forth. Even the men who for years past have been satisfied with the result of their labors are now be- coming sensible of their folly in having confined their operations to mere fossicking in gullies which have been so long persecuted, and we have no doubt but that parties will be organised, as the spring sets in, whose labors will soon obtain results of sufficient magnitude to secure the influx of a digging population which is all we now require to secure the full and perfect development of this important element of our national wealth. To the Directors of this New Company we look with much confidence. Upon their energy we mainly depend not only for the success of the enterprise under their immediate direction, but for the impetus which their success will give to the formation of other kindred Companies. Quartz-Crushing in Victoria just now is all the rage; and, whatever may ultimately be the superiority of the alluvial diggings in that Colony over ours, we have, at all events, every right to claim an equality with our neighbors so far as the wealth of our quartz is concerned. The ball is beginning to roll. It will be our own fault if it is permitted to stop. [71]

August 31 - September 5 Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company. REQUIRED a gentleman to perform the Office Duties of the above Company. He must be a competent book keeper and will be required to find security Salary for the present, at the rate of £200 per annum. Applications, accompanied by satisfactory testimonials, to be forwarded to the Chairman of Directors, at the Offices of the Company, No. 5 Elizabeth street, Hobart Town on or before WEDNESDAY, 7th September. Information relative to the duties, and amount of security, can be obtained of the Hon. Secretary. By order of the Directors, Geo. Morgan, Hon. Sec.[72]

September

September 2-7 Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company. THE DIRECTORS invite applications from gentlemen of the Legal Profession in Hobart Town, for the appointment of Solicitor to the above Company. The above to be addressed to the Chairman of Directors at the offices of the Company, No. 3, Elizabeth-street, on or before Wednesday, the 7th September, 1859. By Order of the Directors, GEORGE MORGAN, Hon. Sec.[73]

September 6-28 NOTICE TO SHAREHOLDERS. Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company: THE BOARD of DIRECTORS are prepared to receive applications for the unappropriated Shares in the above Company, the same to be addressed to the Secretary, marked "Application for Shares," at the offices of the Company, No. 3, Elizabeth-street, on or before THURSDAY, 15th instant. By order of the Directors, GEORGE MORGAN, Hon. Secretary. [74]

September 7 THE SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING AND MINING COMPANY.
The Shareholders of this Company will be glad to learn that the Directors have been indefatigable in their endeavors to bring their arrangements into working order. They have entered into a temporary engagement with Dr. Otway, the Metallurgist, who will at once proceed to Fingal to test the several claims of the Company. For this purpose, Clayton and Shuttleworth's portable testing machine, with a battery of three stampers, will be sent for immediately, and it is expected that the return from the Quartz tested will nearly cover the expense thus incurred. The Directors have also resolved upon offering a reward of one hundred pounds for the discovery of a payable reef within forty miles of Hobart Town. By an advertisement in another column it will be seen that the remaining shares are to be disposed of, the old shareholders being allowed a preference in their distribution. Every possible arrangement has been made to secure the successful operations of the Company, and the Directors are sanguine that their machinery will be procured and vigorously at work before Christmas. We are glad to find that the Directors are thus actively engaged in the important duties delegated to them; and we would strongly advise those who wish to have a finger in the golden pie so soon to be opened in Tasmania to avail themselves of the present opportunity and secure a few shares in this popular Company.[75]

September 9 - October 19 GOLD! GOLD! GOLD! £100 REWARD THE ABOVE SUM is offered for the discovery, within three months from this date, of a Payable Quartz Reef, available for the use of the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company (limited), either on Crown land or on land leased from the Crown, within 40 miles of Hobart Town. By order of Directors, GEORGE MORGAN, Hon. Sec. Sept. 8,1859.[6]

September 8 QUARTZ COMPANY. —At a meeting of the Directors of the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company held yesterday Mr. Cartwright for some time past in the employ of the Gas Company was appointed Secretary to the Company and Mr. D'Arcy Haggitt Solicitor. [76]

September 9 Required FOR the use of the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining. Company (limited), A SPRING DRAY or CART; also a Good Sound Staunch Draft HORSE and HARNESS. Tenders for the above will be received at the Company's Offices up to 12 o'clock, on Saturday next, the 10th inst. By order of Directors, George Morgan, Hon. Sec. 3 Elizabeth-street, 8th Sept. 1859.[6]

September 16 THE SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING AND MINING COMPANY. We have been requested to remind those of the shareholders who have not yet taken up their promisory notes that those notes are now lying overdue at the Bank of Van Diemen's Land. Several, even up to yesterday, were not aware that those notes were due, and we have no doubt that all who have not yet retired them are in the same position. We trust it will be only necessary to inform them of the circumstance in order to induce them to take up these bills without any further delay. [77]

September 20 At a meeting of the Directors of the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company, Mr. Cartright for some time past in the employ of the Gas Company, was appointed Secretary to the Company, and Mr. D'Arcy Haggitt Solicitor. The Company have engaged the services of Dr. Otway, as Metallurgist.[78]

September 22 SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING AND MINING COMPANY. THE Directors of the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company met yesterday and allotted additional shares up to the number of three thousand. In accordance with the resolution formerly arrived at the remaining one thousand shares will be thrown open to the public and will no doubt be readily taken up. The shareholders will be glad to learn that the machinery for testing the various reefs will in all probability arrive from Victoria by the next vessel and will be immediately forwarded to Fingal. Dr. OTWAY is still on the Gold Fields examining the reefs and collecting every information upon the subject so that when the machinery arrives there will not be a moment's delay in commencing practical operations. It is satisfactory to know that the Directors are acting with so much energy and promptitude. Before the spring is far advanced there will we feel convinced be considerable competition, and it is wise on their part, therefore, to make their claim, under the direction of Dr. OTWAY, without any delay.[79]

September 22 FINGAL. [From our own Correspondent.] Contrary to their usual practice, the Company did not wash off on Saturday, the result is therefore not known yet. The return from the alluvial diggings is 8 ozs. Dr. Otway has arrived, and immediately proceeds to the Black Boy for the purpose of testing the value of the various reefs there, and for selecting a spot for the S. T. Company upon which to place their machinery. Considerable interest will attach to the doctor's report, and the result will be anxiously looked for by all who are interested in this subject. Several claims on a new reef there were registered at the Commissioner's office yesterday. A party of prospectors are collecting quartz at the Ormley estate, a few miles from Avoca, where, from the appearance of the quartz and the minerals with which it is associated, there is every probability that it will be found to contain gold. I believe the Company do not intend to publish their returns for the future.[80]

  1. @#@

September 24-28 SOUTHERN TASMANIAN Quartz Crushing and Mining Company, (LIMITED,) Offices No. 3 Elizabeth-street. THE PUBLIC are informed that three thousand shares having been dis- posed of, the remaining reserved shares in the above Company will in compliance with the recommendation of the Provisional Committee be for disposal at par. until further notice. Early application is requested. By order of the Board of Directors, W. J. CARTWRIGHT, Secretary.[81]

October

October 4 FINGAL. Nook, Wednesday. At the Nook this week rather more than the usual stir has exhibited itself, caused by the arrival of a prospecting party from Hobart Town, sent out by the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing Company under the superintendence of Dr. Otway, and a small company or two of alluvial miners. On Tuesday the Southerners discovered two reefs, in one of which gold was found visible to the naked eye, and which Dr. Otway, who took the bearings of it to-day, pronounced as a continuation of Teesdale's Reef from the Black Boy.[82]

October 10-18 Notice to Shareholders. Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company, Limited, A GENERAL MEETING of the Shareholders is hereby convened to take place at Basstian's Hotel, on Wednesday the 19th instant, at 4 o'clock p.m. when the Form of Memorandum of Association and code of Rules for the Government of the Company will be submitted for approval and adoption, in accordance with the Joint Stock Companies Act, 23 Victoria, .No. 12. By order of the Board of Directors, W. J. CARTWRIGHT; Secretary. 3, Elizabeth-street, October 7th, 1859.[83]

October 11 - November 3 Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company, (limited.) Application for Shares IN the above Company will be received at the Office, No. 3, Elizabeth-street, until TUESDAY 1st November, when an allotment will be made. By order of the Directors. W. J. CARTWRIGHT, Secretary. October 6th, 1859.[84]

October 12 Fingal —The arrival or Mr. Thomas, the Surveyor, from Fingal, yesterday morning, confirms the statement that Dr. Otway has made a discovery of a valuable quarts reef in the neighbourhood of the Nook. We understand that the reef is ten feet wide at the crown, and that gold is visible to the naked eye in every portion of it. We congratulate the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Company on the discovery thus made, and hope the Directors will lose no time in turning it to a profitable account. We hear that Dr Otway is expected in town in the course of a few days, with specimens, when we shall learn further particulars of the important discovery. — H. T. Advertiser.[85]

October 14 THE FINGAL DIGGINGS. —The engine for the Southern Tasmania Quartz Crushing and Mining Company brought by the North Star from Melbourne was discharged from the brig, yesterday, for transmission to the Fingal Diggings. [86]

October 15 Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company, limited. CONVEYANCE OF MACHINERY. TENDERS for the Conveyance of a Stamping Machine and a Steam Engine, (the latter on four wheels and provided with double shafts,) to the Company's works, Ben Lomond Rivulet, district of Fingal, will be received at the office, No. 3, Elizabeth-street, Hobart Town, on or before Wednesday next, the 19th instant. For particulars apply at the office, W.J. CARTWRIGHT, Hobart Town, Secretary. 12th October, 1859. [87]

October 17-31 Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company. REQUIRED a gentleman to perform the Office Duties of the above Company. He must be a competent book keeper and will be required to find security Salary for the present, at the rate of £200 per annum. Applications, accompanied by satisfactory testimonials, to be forwarded to the Chairman of Directors, at the Offices of the Company, No. 5 Elizabeth street, Hobart Town on or before WEDNESDAY, 7th September. Information relative to the duties, and amount of security, can be obtained of the Hon. Secretary. By order of the Directors, Geo. Morgan, Hon. Sec.[88]

October 18 SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING AND MIN- ING COMPANY. We remind the Shareholders of this Company that a meeting of their body will take place to-morrow afternoon at 4 o'clock at Basstian's Hotel, Argyle-street, to consider the Form of Memorandum of Association and the Code of Rules for the government of the Company, which will be submitted to them for approval and adoption. This proceeding has been rendered necessary by the Joint Stock Companies Act, passed in the last session of Parliament, and the Shareholders will see the propriety of giving their attendance upon an occasion so important to the interests of the Company. [89]

October 20 SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING & MINING COMPANY, LIMITED. A general meeting of the Shareholders of the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crush- ing and Mining Company was held at the Bird-in-Hand, Argyle-street, yesterday afternoon for the purpose of considering the form of memorandum of Association and code of rules for the government of the Company, submitted by the Directors for approval and adoption, in accordance with the Joint Stock Companies Act 23 Vic. No. 12. Shortly after four o'clock about fifty or sixty shareholders were present amongst whom were Messrs. C. Atkins, W. Hebblewhite, J. Davies, R. Worley, J. C. Hall, J. McGrath, T. Hornby, J. Doughty, R. Bright, J. Pettard, J. Park, W. Belbin, F. C. Tribe, H. Boyes, Fletcher, H. J. Chap- man, R.T. Edwards, G. Rolwegan, Middleton, F Piguenit, J. Hall, Alderman Seabrook, Scott, Israel Hyams, Watson, T Mills, G. Morgan, Morling, Rev. Mr. Dixon, Dowdell, Drake, Wimbush, &c., &c., &c. On the motion of Mr. J. Davies Mr. W. Hebblewhite was unanimously voted into the chair. The Chairman briefly remarked that at the last meeting of the Shareholders a promise was given that the Directors should bring up rules and regulations for the government of the Company, and they were met that day to hear them read. He would call upon the Hon. Secretary to read the memorandum of Association and the rules and regulations as submitted by the Directors. At the suggestion of Mr. Petterd the proceedings were delayed till a quarter past 4 o'clock as such rigid punctuality was not generally expected as commencing at the exact time named for the meeting. Mr. J. Davies took the opportunity, during the pause, of reading the report of the Gold Commissioner at Fingal received by the Colonial Treasurer that morning which he said contained most important and cheering news from the auriferous districts. He had also seen a letter to Mr. Bonney from his son at Fingal which stated that his party bottomed a hole last Saturday out of which they obtained three ounces of gold. (Hear, hear.) (Mr. Tully's Report appears in another column.) The Hon. Secretary having read the form of Memorandum of Association and the Rules and Regulations, 94 in number, Mr. Petterd moved, and Mr. Wimbush seconded, an adjournment of the meeting till the 26th instant, which, after some explanatory remarks from Mr. Davies and Mr. Worley relative to what the Directors had done, was carried without opposition. The meeting thus stands adjourned until the same hour on Wednesday next.[90] Tully’s report follows.

October 20 HIGHLY IMPORTANT FROM FINGAL. OFFICIAL REPORT. Through the politeness of the Colonial Treasurer we are enabled to lay the following highly encouraging Official Report from the Commissioner of the Gold Fields before our readers:— Commissioner's Office, Fingal, 15th Oct. 1859. SIR, —I have the honor to forward for your information the accompanying returns; and have also much satisfaction in drawing attention to the amount of gold obtained by the diggers at the Nook during the last week. There are at pre- sent 45 men engaged in mining on their own account, and I believe they are realising, without exception, more than the average rate of wages in the District. Amongst this class of men, I have not heard a doubt expressed as to the payable results of their operations, however disinclined they may be to report their actual gain; and I have no hesitation in stating, that, both from my own observation, and the experience of others, on whose opinion I can rely, there is a greater certainty of obtaining a livelihood on these Gold Fields, and that individual labor will secure a more constant return, than at any of the Victorian mines during the existing period. This is a fact on which I have taken much trouble to satisfy myself, nor should I have alluded to the matter was I not assured of its correctness. There is nothing of consequence to re- port in connection with the Quartz Reefs. The several parties are working energetically, but the nature of their operations is not such as to admit of either much progress or important results. Being on the point of starting with the Geological Surveyor to the head waters of the Tyne, to explore the country in that neighborhood, I am obliged to conclude hastily. I have the honor to be, Sir, Your most obedient Servant, (Signed) WM. ALCOCK TULLY. The Honorable the Colonial Treasurer. [91]

October 24 FINGAL. MEETING AT THE DIGGING. [From our own Correspondent.] A meeting of gold diggers was held yesterday, at Dr. Ottway's camp, near the Aqua Calianta reef of the S. T. Company, for the purpose of considering the present position of the alluvial diggings, and for devising some plan for their more perfect development. The meeting was well attended, nearly all the alluvial diggers, is well as the men employed by the Company, being present. At the request of the meeting, Mr. Jennings presided. The Chairman, after a few explanatory observations, called upon Dr. Ottway, who addressed the meeting at some length, referring to the fact that at the present time diggers possessed' no legal title whatever to the ground they were working, and were liable to have their claims "jumped" at any time, by any party powerful enough to do so. To meet this difficulty, the doctor urged the necessity for united action on the part of the diggers, and the formation of a local court for the adjustment of miners' rights, similar to those in operation upon the Victoria gold fields. A resolution in favor of this idea was sub mitted to the meeting and unanimously carried, and a committee formed to carry it into effect. For developing the gold field, the doctor was in favor of inviting external aid, in the shape of cash, tools, and rations. The diggings are visited every week by numbers of men wholly unprovided with these necessaries, and not being able to remain more than few days invariably leave the diggings as unsuccessful diggers, and by their unfavourable re port deter others from coming who would give them a fair trial. Should a fund similar to that suggested be provided, these men could be set to work, and thus open up the field. Several diggers addressed the meeting in favor of the motion, and Mr. Fietcher, an experienced digger on the Fingal field, moved a resolution to the effect that a committee he appointed to receive contributions for the purpose of keeping a prospecting party at work, which was seconded and carried. At the termination of the meeting, Dr. Ottway addressed a few practical observations to the diggers, advising them to lead sober and orderly lives, in preference to the drunken and dissolute habits too prevalent on gold fields, and offered the diggers generally advice and medicines gratis, and reiterated the observation he had previously made that he believed the Fingal diggings would ultimately prove as rich as any discovered on the other side. A day having been appointed for the committees to meet, three cheers were given for Dr. Ottway, and the meeting, which had been a very orderly and well-arranged one, broke up.[92]

October 27 THE SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING & MINING COMPANY. A very large meeting of the Share- holders was holden at Mr. Basstian's, Bird-in-Hand Hotel, Argyle street, yesterday afternoon, to take into consideration the memorandum and articles of| association and code of regulations pre- pared by the Directory and submitted to the Shareholders for adoption. His Worship the Mayor presiding. The draft was gone through, the Clauses being read and discussed seriatim, and some verbal amendments made. The draft as amended was then agreed to, and a vote of thanks having been passed to the Directors for the great trouble and care which they had bestowed on the preparation of the draft, and to his Worship the Mayor for his impartial conduct in the chair, the meeting broke up. [93]

November

November 1-2 Fingal Gold Fields DR. OTWAY being on a visit to Hobart Town, will give a little DIGGER'S CHAT, ABOUT THE FINGAL GOLD FIELDS, And the Mode, Means and Material required to fully develope them. The Lecture will be delivered at the THEATRE ROYAL, On WEDNESDAY EVENING Next November 2nd, Admission will be gratuitous by Tickets, to be obtained from any of the Directors, and at the offices of the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company, and at the Mercury and Advertiser offices. Doors open at half-past 6, Lecture will commence at 7 o'clock precisely. [94]

November 1 Dr. Otway in Tasmania.—The following is from the Hobart Town Advertiser of the 1st inst. :—"Dr. Otway has arrived in town, from the scene of the Southern Company's operations at Fingal, and we are happy to say continues to speak in the most sanguine terms of the richness of the district, and the prospects ol the miners who will thoroughly test it. Dr. Otway states that there is every indication of a gold-field as rich as Ballarat—but one like Ballarat to be developed only by deep sinking. Hitherto we have confined our operations almost to the surface, and have succeeded in finding the shotty gold near the top, that found at a much greater depth at Ballarat stimulates the miner to work his way down in search of the riper treasure of which it is regarded as the sure token. We trust it will be the mission of the Southern Company, by the use of adequate means, to set the example of deep working, and so prove truly the pioneer company of the colony."[95]

November 1 FINGAL GOLD FIELDS. DR. OTWAY who is now on a visit to Hobart Town from the Fingal Diggings intends to deliver a lecture at the Theatre Royal on Wednesday (to-morrow) evening on a subject which ought to possess a deep interest for the whole community. He himself designates his address "Diggers' Chat about the Fingal Gold Fields; and the mode, means, and material required to fully develop them." We hope there will be a large attendance. The lecturer is in a position to speak from experience having been for some time past engaged at Fingal on behalf of the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company, under the auspices of the Directors of which Company this lecture will be given. To those who really take an interest in the well being of the Colony this lecture will possess sufficient attractions to induce them to attend. The admission will be gratis, although it will be necessary for parties desirous of listening to Dr. Otway's opinions concerning the present and future of Fingal to obtain tickets either from the Directors of the Company or at the offices of the Advertiser or Mercury. A collection will be made at the close of the lecture to defray the expenses of lighting the Theatre on the occasion, the use of the Theatre having been generously given for the purpose free of charge.[96]

November 3 THE FINGAL GOLD FIELDS. - There were no less than 137 persons employed on these Gold Fields during the past week of whom 39 were in the service of the Quartz Crushing Company, and there were also seven in Dr. Otway's party. A party of 51 were at the alluvial diggings and thirty-seven at the Black Boy Reefs. The men engaged at the alluvial diggings obtained 19 ounces ia the week, and the men at Black Boy are engaged opening a new reef.[97]

November 3 FINGAL GOLD FIELDS. A Lecture on the Fingal Gold Fields and the mode, means, and material required fully to develope them, was delivered at the Theatre Royal last night by Dr. Otway. His Worship the Mayor presided. The Platform, Boxes, and Pit of the Theatre were filled with an assembly of our most influential citizens and trades- men, and the lecture was also attended by a large number of ladies.
The Lecturer expressed his satisfaction at seeing so numerous an assemblage, and that it seemed that the sine qua non for this Colony was, Gold, Gold, Gold; and having referred to his visits to various parts of the world, said he had formed a conclusion that the parallels between which gold was ever found passed through this Colony. (Cheers.) He came here as a stranger, but received so kindly a welcome, and had experienced such generous treatment as would bind him to them for the course of his life. (Cheers.) He was but a simple digger, but was afraid he must call them 'a lazy set with regard to the Gold Fields. (Cheers.) He was satisfied that the auriferous district of this Colony was not confined to Fingal, and that there were here Gold Fields as rich as in California or Victoria, or as any other Gold Fields in the world, but they must excuse him if he told them some home truths to arouse them from their sloth. Dr. Otway here drew a rough sketch of the Esk and its tributaries, pointing out the different reefs on the N.W. portion of the Island, and said the whole of that district was auriferous, and that from the Bay of Fires to Ben Lomond, and he had travelled through the whole of the eastern district, was with little exception also highly auriferous. He then mentioned the names of various parties on the diggings, mentioning that Jenning's party was getting from l½ to 2 ozs. per week, but he said before they came upon the heavy deposits they must get down to the de composed granite, and to do this they must demand the countenance of every man in Tasmania. Talk of want of employment, there were many who went about pretending to look for employment, praying at the same time that they might not find it. (Laughter.) The district to the southward of Teasdale's Claim was highly auriferous, and he was sure there was sufficient gold in the bed of the Esk to pay for its diversion. Near Mr. Sutherland's was a most available field, but it required the strong arm and men, who, like him, did not believe in "I can't." There were many on the Gold Fields quite destitute and without tools, and a meeting had been called at the Nook, at which one gentleman promised a ton of flour, another three tons of potatoes, and so on for rations, so that he would be enabled to give any of them good rations who would come up. (Loud cheers.) Those who came, if they worked would get good wages, but if they did not, he should soon start them, but good wages could be got, for the Gold Fields of Fingal were unequalled in richness. They had a capital of wealth but they wanted a capital of thews and sinews. Dr. Otway next explained that by puddling or sluicing great results could be obtained, in the localities he pointed out, and said the land between the Esk and the Tyne, was also auriferous, and so also were the reefs to the great bend, and he knew that these reefs must pass within 20 miles and to the eastward of this place, The Gold was found always between the great meridianal bands running from North to South. He invited all who felt inclined to come up to his camp at the Nook, and if he could not give them money he would find them work, and give them a piece of damper as big as a coach wheel. (Laughter.) He next referred to the Malahide Estate, and the land to the westward of Killumoon Bridge, and said that he not only found gold but other minerals also, particularly in the Saint Patrick Ranges, but they were too lethargic to develope their auriferous wealth. He next proceeded to show by diagrams the position and working of the claims of the Southern Tasmanian Company, and the situation of an auriferous valley 800 yards in length, and 500 in breadth, descending to the south. He did not look upon the Southern Tasmanian Company, as the Company of a day, but he looked upon it as the lever to move the whole Island to prosperity. (Loud cheers.) He did not wish for a richer vein than the one he had struck. (Cheers.) He had the pleasure to announce that he had been honored with a commission to find a harbor on the north-east coast, for the commerce of Hobart Town, (cheers), and he would find one if he did not become a ghost. In a short time he would send down his report to that great moral engine the press, and he hoped they would not let the excitement die away and fail. He was not a prophet, nor was he the son of a prophet, but he could prophecy that, if they encouraged literature, art and science, if they encouraged morality and virtue, and the establishment of schools, the noble country which God had given them, Tasmania, would become to the Southern Hemisphere what England was to the world. (Loud cheers.) Let them do this, and expunging their motto of "Advance Australia!" take up the motto "Excelsior!" and be the first, and not the last in the great race between the Colonies in the Southern Hemisphere. They had wealth, they had energy, they bad enterprise, but their energy and enterprise were asleep, still he trusted that this would not long continue, and that they would all unite and put shoulder to shoulder when he had the pleasure, which he hoped to have shortly, of sending down to the Southern Company the first nugget of Gold from their diggings. (Loud cheers.)
The Lecturer concluded his lecture amidst much cheering. The Mayor, Chairman of the Company, moved a vote of thanks to Dr. Otway, which was carried by acclamation. Mr. Lewis then acquainted the Shareholders that the machinery lately imported for the Company would be in full operation at Clarke & Davidson's yards on Saturday, previous to its removal to Fingal, for the inspection of members of the Company, and that tickets of admission would be obtained at the offices of the Committee. (Cheers.) Dr. Otway briefly returned thanks and the meeting separated.[98]

November 5 ...on Wednesday evening Dr. Otway gave a lecture on the Fingal gold field, and the mode, means, and material a required to develop it. He gave it as his opinion that it would prove as rich as many others if it were worked with sufficient energy.[99]

November 7 THE SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING AND MINING COMPANY. THE CRUSHING MACHINE. The Crushing Machine and Steam Engine imported for this Company were set up in the workshop of Messrs. Clarke and Company Engineers, New Wharf, on Saturday, for the inspection of shareholders and others interested in the progress of the Company, whilst in full operation. Amongst the large number present were the Right Worshipful the Mayor, David Lewis, Esq , Chairman of the Company; the Hon. W. Nairn, M.L.C., Hon. J. M. Wilson, M.L.C., T. D. Chapman, Esq, M. H. A., Maxwell Miller, Esq., M.H.A., Aldermen Barrett, Rheuben, Murdoch, and Stewart, and Messrs C. Degraves Maning, J. Davies, N. Lewis. Makelg, T. Brown, Dr. Butler, Dr. Doughty, Dr. Agnew, D'Arcy Haggitt, Salier, Rolwegan, J. Hall, Captain M'Arthur, Buckland, West cott, C. W. Hall, Captain Fisher, &c., &c.
The engine is a portable engine of six horse power, manufactured by Clayton mid Shuttle- worth, Lincoln, weighing 55 cwt., and is fitted with a link motion, allowing the engine to be reversed at pleasure. The battery is composed of three stampers, fitted in a strong wooden frame. Each shaft shod with a cast iron stamp head, 7 inches in diameter, and 16 inches in length, of 2 cwt. each, secured to the stamp shafts by malleable iron pintles. By means of three cams keyed in a shaft driven by a rigger, or drum wheel, 5 ft. 6 in. in diameter, connected with the engine by a 6 inch belt, running on a pulley of 20 inch diameter attached to the engine shaft, the stampers are each alternately raised twice at each revolution of the cam shaft, delivering 120 blows per minute, the weight of percussion of each stamper being estimated at 400 lbs. The quartz for crushing is first broken into pieces somewhat larger than an egg, which are fed into a cast iron box, supplied with water, of oblong shape, 2½ in, by 14, and 6 inches thick, the bottom of the box resting on solid sleepers. In the first box is a port, l8 in. by 8, and into this is fastened a grating of wire cloth, consisting of three plies of wire. Through this grating the quartz, when reduced to a very finne powder, is washed down a gutter into the amalgamator, in the shape of a circular iron box or dish, two feet in diameter. In the amalgamator is a funnel shaped dish, and below the bottom of the funnel is a bed of quicksilver. On this bed the pulverised quartz falls and the quicksilver having united with the Gold the waste quartz is washed over a lip in the side of the amalgamator, and the bed is as occasion may require placed in a retort for the purpose of separating the quicksilver on the amalgam from the Gold.
The bountiful precision and ease with which the quartz was rapidly pulverised by this powerful battery gave the greatest satisfaction to the very numerous spectators, and the successful working of the battery was a matter of much congratulation to those more immediately interested in the rapid development of the rich gold reefs with which it is incontestably shown the colony abounds. After the engine had been at work some time three hearty cheers were given for His Worship the Mayor, Chairman of the Company, three for Dr. Otway, and three for Messrs. Clarke & Company, including the Messrs. Clarke junior who have been principally engaged in erecting the engine and battery for its maiden trial. We noticed also, at the entrance end of Messrs. Clarke & Company's workshops vertical drilling machine by Nasmyth & Co. Patrick croft, and a larger one by the eminent J. Whit worth of Manchester, driven by a small four horse horizontal self-acting engine by Smith, Deacock & Tannett of Leads, well deserving the attention of visitors.[100]

November 11 OUR MINERALS. FINGAL. As summer approaches the question concerning which so much has been said is once more trembling upon every tongue. Hopes and fears are again reviving. Year after year rolls on finding us in the spring elated and leaving us in the autumn desponding. Still that question - Have we a payable gold field? remains unanswered. Shall we have to make the same enquiry next year? We doubt it. Almost imperceptibly, gradual has been the development of the mineral wealth at Fingal, have our minds become reconciled to the belief that energy and perseverance are all that we require to enable us to take our stand side by side with our auriferous neighbors. Those who have hitherto successfully withstood the seductive evidence which has been offered to them of the steadily increasing yield of our gold fields are beginning to waver in their incredulity. Men have absolutely doubted their own senses knowing how apt we are to be deceived on a matter on which our feelings are strongly excited. That which we desire we are too ready to believe; and it is, therefore, considered one of the surest proofs of worldly wisdom to doubt the accuracy of any revelation which would confer upon us advantages we had never dreamed of possessing. Because, on this subject, we are anxious overmuch we are also unbelieving overmuch. And this has been our bane. Had the question been of some less exciting and less beneficial character we should have brought our enquiries long before now to a practical issue. In after years the people of this colony will look back with amazement ??? the apparent, for it is only apparent, indifference and supineness of the present generation, and marvel, as well they may, at the extraordinary infatuation and immoveable incredulity we are now displaying. The time, however, we verily believe, has now arrived when a different line of conduct will be adopted. The returns which the diggers are now obtaining are sufficiently attractive to command attention, and they are sufficiently well authenticated to disarm unbelief. At the end of six weeks' work two men had obtained an amount of gold in the most primitive mode of seeking it which gave to each man a sum of no less than eight pounds per week for his labor; and, although this was an exceptional case, there can be no doubt, from the returns forwarded to the government, that all the diggers are doing exceedingly well. Their numbers are fast increasing, and their faith in the splendid destiny of Fingal becomes more firmly rooted every day. They have held meetings amongst them- selves and appointed some of their own men to prospect the country between Fingal and the River Tyne. Holes are being sunk in many places previously untried but the result is as yet unknown; and every disposition is now being manifested to give to these gold fields a thorough examination.
Quartz Crushing operations have been at a stand still, it having been determined, as we stated in our last Summary, to suspend crushing until the new and more powerful machinery for the Midland Company has been erected. This machinery is fast arriving in the colony from Sydney at which place it has been manufactured. All the necessary buildings are being erected; and it is expected that this Company will resume its crushing operations in the course of a month or two. The result obtained by the Company, even with the imperfect machinery hitherto at its disposal, was quite sufficient to establish the payable character of Quartz Crushing in Tasmania.
The whole colony is looking with anxiety for the recommencement of operations, as, should the returns be such as we have every right to expect they will be, it will I give an impetus to this enterprise which will go far to lift Tasmania from her present unenviable commercial position. Nor has the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company been idle. On Tuesday last this Company's beautiful little testing machine was removed from the works of its manufacturers en route to Fingal. Hundreds of our citizens were present to witness its removal and as it passed along the principal thoroughfares, surmounted with the Company's banner and drawn by five horses, all felt that in this and similar machinery much of the future of this beautiful colony depends. The object of this machine is, as its name implies, to test the various reefs before erecting more powerful machinery, so that the latter may not be placed at too great a distance from the reef on which the Company may finally determine to commence operations. It is estimated that the yield of this small machine will be ample to cover the expenses of the Company until the new machinery can be erected.
Dr. OTWAY, under whose charge the works at Fingal have been placed, has received instructions from the Company to explore the country between Fingal, the River Tyne, and George's Bay, in every part of which gold in small quantities has been found. Nor will his explorations be confined exclusively to the discovery of gold. Other minerals are known to exist throughout the whole of this portion of the Island, and it is not unlikely, therefore, that this service may prove beneficial to the colony in more ways than one.
It must not be supposed, however, that the Companies we have mentioned are the only companies which have been formed. In Launceston, the capital of the north, a people's company is in existence; and, both there and in the Southern Capital, the nucleus of other Companies exists, the proprietors of which last are only waiting the completion of the Midland Company's Machinery in order to commence vigorous operations. Nor must it be supposed either that there is any doubt as to the success of this enterprise; no one disbelieves in the existence here of numberless reefs of auriferous quartz. But it is found to be difficult, after so many disappointments, to satisfy the mind even by evidence the most conclusive. We are, as we said just now, cautious over much. This feeling of distrust and suspicion, however, is fast giving way; and we are not without hope that, in the course of a month or two, the mineral wealth which we confidently believe we possess will vindicate every syllable we have written in order to arouse the in- habitants of this colony from their extraordinary and unconquerable unbelief.[101]

November 11 On the 2nd instant, Dr. Otway delivered at the Theatre Royal a lecture on the Fingal Gold Fields, and the mode, means, and material required fully to develope them. His Worship the Mayor presided, and platform, boxes, and pit were filled with an assembly of our most influential citizens and trades men, and many ladies.[102]

November 11 We have on many occasions expressed our warm approval of the Joint Stock Company's Act. In this Colony there are many enterprises, such, for instance, as the one upon which we are now writing, which are more likely to be successfully undertaken by companies formed for the purpose than by individuals. This Act is of an extremely plastic nature and can be made available for large enterprises or for enterprises of an extremely limited character; besides which the great principle embodied in it of limited liability removes all apprehension of heavy losses. All that is required to secure the prosperity of such companies is that the object for which they have been formed should be as well considered, and its remunerative character as clearly established at the onset, as the nature of the enterprise will permit. The Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing Company has recently been established on this principle, and gives us a fair idea of what can be done. Other companies might be as easily formed as this has been, and we cannot understand, therefore, why any difficulty should be experienced in carrying out the project of establishing a Whaling Company in Tasmania similar to those now being established, under less promising auspices, in Melbourne and Geelong. [103]

November 12 OUR GOLD DIGGINGS. Nothing of importance has occurred at Fingal since our last report. The Midland, Launceston, and Hobart Town Companies are busily engaged in erecting their quartz crushing machinery. It appears that the number of persons at work at the Fingal diggings is about one hundred, of whom forty- five are at work on their own account, the others being employed by the quartz companies. The yield of alluvial gold has improved, two men having got twenty-four ounces in six weeks. An expedition up the River Inglis by Mr. Lette, a government surveyor, has resulted in the discovery of fine gold in that part of the country, but very little is known on the subject at present. [104]

November 17 FINGAL. (From our own Correspondent.) It is much to be regretted that we have no means of ascertaining the actual yield of the gold fields. The only return, or apology for one, is that furnished weekly to the police; but from the first diggers have shown no disposition to state their actual finds, and always as a rule under- state what is really obtained. This was apparent last week, the return for which is 17 ounces, but it is well known on the ground that it falls short of the real amount by three or four ounces. Considerable activity prevails at the Nook. The Midland Company are getting their Chilian mill in trim again; the rollers are being furnished with new tires and fresh stampers, and stamper bars sup- plied; when these repairs are completed it will be as effective as when first set to work and will be employed crushing quartz from the reef on Specimen Hill. The contractors are making considerable progress in the erection of the new machinery at Sailor's Gully; the cylinders of the engine and huge fly-wheel are fitted and in their places, and some idea may now be formed of the extent and power of the machinery employed. The boilers are also nearly finished and will be set in a week or two. The small engine and machine for the S. T. Company arrived here yesterday morning and reached the Agua Callienta Reef in the evening; as it will take but a short time to get it ready for working we may soon expect to know the result of the quartz to be tested. 15th November. [105]

November 17 FINGAL. The following official communication from Mr. Tully the Commissioner of the gold fields has been politely handed to us for publication.
Commissioner's Office.
Fingal Nov. 14 1859.
SIR,—I have the honor to forward for your information the accompanying returns of the amount of gold obtained during the week ending the 12th instant, and also beg to draw your attention to the number of alluvial miners who are now working in the vicinity of the Nook. On the last occasion when I alluded to the matter there were only 45 men engaged, but at present there are 68 who are totally dependent on their own individual exertions, and I have every reason to expect that this class of diggers will be considerably increased as the season advances. The 22 ounces which the diggers acknowledged to have obtained during the last seven days, and which I believe to be less than their actual gains, at the market price of gold gives 25s. per man, which is not far short of the rate of labourers wages in the same locality. This progression is most satisfactory and has induced me to obtain every information respecting the position of the several parties, so that, as the ground is now surveyed, I shall be in a position in the course of a few days to furnish your office with the number of men working on both public and private lands, as well as those occupying the same for residence or business purposes.
The machinery belonging to the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing Company passed through this place to-day on its way to the Nook and will at once be erected at the reef recently prospected by Dr. Otway's party. From the fact of the mill and engine being portable much benefit to the district may be anticipated as the promoters of the scheme will be in a position to examine a number of reefs, which might under other circum- stances remain untried and neglected.
The bridge lately removed by Mr. Clark in consequence of the residents failing to subscribe the amount which he incurred in erecting it was replaced on the 12th inst., and the inhabitants have expressed on several occasions the satisfaction which they felt at the promptness of the Executive in attending to their wants as exemplified in their course of action on the withdrawal of the only means of communication between Fingal and Mangana.
I regret that I have nothing to report respecting the quartz claims already allowed. The men are still employed in sinking shafts and examining the course and extent of the veins. It is much to be deplored that something more energetic is not done, as every one is looking forward to the commencement of operations which will determine their auriferous value. I fear that the true secret of the delay lies in the fact that each party is waiting for the other to begin, and hope thereby to obtain that knowledge and experience of their claims which will be established by the practical working of the first who enter into the speculation.
Mr. J. A. Thompson has visited this neighbourhood with the intention of erecting in connection with a Company a gold washing machine of the most approved description; and as I have heard that there are other associations about to be established in Hobart Town for the same purpose, it may be expected that these gold fields shall at last assume an importance which has hitherto been denied them.
I have the honor to be
Sir,
Your obdt. servant,
WM. ALCOCK TULLY.
Commissioner.[106]

November 19 FINGAL DIGGINGS. The following is the last report of the Commissioner:— Commissioner's Office, Fingal, 14th Nov, 1859. SIR. —I have the honor to forward for your information the accompanying returns of the amount of gold obtained during the week ending the 12th instant, and also beg to draw your attention to the number of alluvial miners who are now working in the vicinity of the Nook. On the last occasion when I alluded to the matter there were only 45 men engaged; but at present there are 68 who are totally de- pendent on their own individual exertions, and I have every reason to expect that this class of diggers will be considerably increased as the season advances. The 22 ounces which the diggers acknowledge to have obtained during the last seven days (and which I believe to be less than their actual gain), at the market price of gold gives twenty five shillings per man, which is not far short of the rate of laborer's wages in the same locality. This progression is most satisfactory, and has induced me to obtain every information respecting the position of the several parties so that as the ground is now surveyed I shall be in a position in the course of a few days to furnish your office with the number of men working on both public and private lands; as well as those occupying the same for residence or business purposes. The machinery belonging to the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Company passed through this place today on its way to the Nook, and will at once be erected at the reef recently prospected by Dr. Otway's party. From the fact of the mill and engine being portable much benefit to the district may be anticipated as the promoters of the scheme will be in a position to examine a number of reefs which might under other circumstances remain untried and neglected. The bridge lately removed by Mr Clerke in consequence of the residents failing to sub- scribe the amount which he incurred in erecting it, was replaced on the 12th instant; and the inhabitants have expressed, on several occasions, the satisfaction which they feel at the prompt- ness of the Executive in attending to this work as exemplified by their course of action in the withdrawal of the only means of communication between Fingal and Mangana. I regret that I have nothing to report respecting the quartz claims already allowed. The men are still employed in sinking shafts and examining the course and extent of the veins. It is much to be deplored that something more energetic is not done, as everyone is looking forward to the commencement of operations, which will determine their auriferous value. I fear that the true secret of the delay lies in the fact that each party is waiting for the other to begin, and hope thereby to obtain that knowledge and experience of their claims, which will be established by the practical working of the first who enters into the speculation. Mr. J. A. Thomson has visited this neighborhood with the intention of erecting, in connection with a company, a gold-washing ma- chine of the most approved description and as I have heard that there are other associations about to be established in Hobart Town for the same purpose, it may be expected that these gold fields will at last assume an importance which has hitherto been denied them. I have, &c., W. ALCOCK TULLY. Commissioner.[107]

December

December 8 FINGAL. (From our own Correspondent.) Nothing has occurred at the diggings for the last week or two worth reporting. At the present time and for the next couple of months sheep shearing and harvesting offer greater inducement to the men than gold digging. The number at work on the field now is less than previously, and the return of the gold obtained not so large; last week, 13 ounces were reported. The Midland Company are actively preparing for their summer campaign. The engines and boilers are finished, and the erection of the stamper batteries being proceeded with; but the machinery can hardly be completed by the contract time, and will probably commence crushing about the middle of January. The small machine on the S. T. Company's reef is at work. The quartz being tested is from the reef at the Black Boy (Teasdale's) now being worked by Mr. Spring. The weather has lately been very hot and sultry. During the prevalence of the hot winds on Sunday, the thermometer stood at 100 F. in the shade. Fingal, December 6. [108]

December 12 OUR GOLD FIELDS. The number of diggers at Fingal is steadily increasing. One of the greatest drawbacks to the development of this gold field has been the absurd belief entertained by those who have proceeded there that gold was to be obtained without labor or implements of any kind. Of course they soon found out their mistake and returned, spreading reports of the most untruthful character in order to conceal their folly in having entertained such preposterous expectations. We have never said that Fingal was a rich gold field. Whether it will eventually prove to be one remains to be seen. The utmost we have asserted has been that any man who chooses to be industrious can obtain excellent wages by digging there for gold. The best proof that he can do so is that there are men still following this pursuit at Fingal who have been engaged in it at that place for the last five or six years. Hitherto nothing has been done beyond surfacing and sinking perhaps half a dozen holes. Any one practically acquainted with the business of a gold digger knows the truth of what we have repeatedly asserted, viz, —that these Gold Fields have never been tried. When they have been it will be time enough to condemn them as un- prolific. Until then, although we will not say that they will turn out as we should like to see them turn out, yet we must, at the same time, be permitted to withhold our belief in the gloomy predictions of men who have no better authority for declaring them to be worthless than we have for pronouncing them to be amazingly rich. It is sufficient for us to know that those who choose to work and who have supplied themselves with the necessary tools, have had no cause to complain of the results of their labor. If men are silly enough to go to Fingal without either the means of digging or the means of living in idleness, they will not only be disappointed but they will well deserve to be disappointed. But our hopes of discovering rich alluvial diggings, as will be seen elsewhere, do not centre in Fingal. Whether the alluvial diggings in this latter locality are destined hereafter to prove more than remunerative or not, its importance to the Colony as a gold bearing district is not likely to diminish. The reefs of auriferous quartz which abound there, and which have been proved to be sufficiently rich to repay the outlay necessary for purchasing powerful machinery, will guarantee it from neglect. To the Midland Company is due the honor of having first proved our quartz to be auriferous. Since then, however, various Quartz Crushing Companies have been formed, and before long there will be several machines at work upon the reefs. The new machinery manufactured by Messrs. RUSSELL, of Sydney has all reached this Colony and will be erected by the contract time —the close of the present month. Pending this all crush- ing operations have been at a stand still, the Midland Company having been employed in the meantime in quarrying and burning quartz from Vallentine's Reef. In the first week in January the machinery will commence crushing, and the Company intend inviting His Excellency the GOVERNOR, and many of the leading Merchants, Members of Parliament, Capitalists, &c, to be present on the occasion. The pretty little township of Fingal, quiet and unassuming as it has hitherto been, will scarcely know itself in the holiday dress it will wear. Had any one foretold what would have been the future of this district they would have been laughed at by the incredulous for their simplicity, When we visited the diggings nearly twelve months ago, we plainly foresaw the importance they would eventually acquire and we subjected ourselves to any amount of ridicule for having honestly given expression to even our very moderate opinions. All that we then predicted, however, has been, or very shortly will be, verified. The commencement of operations with this powerful machinery will be a new epoch in the history of the Colony. The Company has resolved to publish the amount of gold procured each week, and this return will be of a character, we feel persuaded, to convince the minds of the most stubborn and to penetrate the incredulity of the most unbelieving. The Southern Tasmanian Company's Testing Machine is now engaged in trying the various reefs with which the Fingal District abounds, but we have not yet heard with what result. The Launceston Company's machinery is also getting towards completion. There have been several private Companies formed also, but as their proceedings have not been given to the public we are not in a position to say to what state of forward- ness their arrangements have been brought. So much for Fingal. But what are we to expect from the explorations just left us for the Eldon Range? What shall we say of the discoveries recently made on the River Inglis? In another column we have adverted at some length to the fitting out and departure of these exploring parties. We have the assurance of Geology, and our own experience that these expeditions into our north-western country will be most successful. The gold we are habitually finding in every river taking its rise amongst the huge quartz mountains in the vicinity of the Eldon Range is a sufficient guarantee that large deposits exist somewhere in that hitherto untrodden region. Then why should these expeditions, fitted out expressly to explore that section of the Island, not be eminently successful? Is there any law of the Medes and Persians prohibiting Tasmania from the enjoyment of similar prosperity to that enjoyed by her big sisters! We trow not. When our prospects as a gold country were at their lowest ebb; when to believe in the existence of rich gold fields in this Island was deemed to be the sure mark of a weak and credulous mind; when our faith subjected us to ridicule and con- tempt; even then we dared to believe, aye, and to avow that belief. Is it likely that we shall waver now when all that ww have predicted is on the eve of accomplishment? We have waited long, anxiously, trustingly. Who is there bold enough to say that we shall be disappointed? [109]

December 15-20 Day of Sale, TUESDAY, 20th December.... THE ENTIRE HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE and EFFECTS... AND Five Shares in the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company.[110]

December 20 We also paid a visit to the Agua Caliente Mines belonging to the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing Company and inspected the works under the superintendence of the Company's Metallurgist - Dr. OTWAY. The face of the reef into which a drive of five fathoms has been put was opened whilst we were there, and gives indications of a highly auriferous character. The drive is six feet four inches wide and ten feet in height. It is shielded with massive timbers and entirely roofed in so as to give every security to the men engaged in working it. The reef is about four feet four inches in depth. A substantial tramway of one hundred feet long has also been laid down. The testing machine which has been substantially fixed at a distance of about sixty yards from the banks of the creek, has been dammed, and a sluice, with small flood gates ingeniously contrived by which a never failing supply of water is secured to the machine. A temporary covering has been thrown over the latter and at the back of it a self-acting hopper, another ingenious contrivance of Dr. OTWAY'S, keeps it constantly supplied with quartz. A drain has also been constructed by which the whole of the refuse water is discharged into the creek below the dam. Dr. OTWAY is now engaged in crushing about ten tons of quartz from the crown of the reef the result of which he intends to forward to the Board of Directors of the Southern Tasmanian Company. He will then immediately commence vigorous operations upon the promising reef which he has just opened. This reef is not only of enormous proportions, but it is declared by good and competent judges from the indications it gives of the presence of gold to be highly auriferous. Should this prediction, when tested by the machine, prove true, the Company, we presume, will not lose one moment in obtaining similar machinery to that of the Midland Company in order to develop and realize its wealth.[111]

December 23 SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING AND MINING COMPANY.
Offices of the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company (limited). Elizabeth-street, 22nd Dec, 1859.
DEAR SIR, - I have the pleasure to forward you the report of a special Com- mission from the Board of Directors of the Company despatched last week to report on the progress of the Compnny's works at Fingal and to respectfully re- quest, as it is of sufficient public interest, you will accord it a place in your widely circulated journal. I also forward you an extract of a letter received from Dr. Otway the Company's manager at the mine to be treated in a similar manner.
I Remain, Dear Sir,
Your obedient servant,
D. LEWIS.
The Editor of the Hobart Town Mercury.

To THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSH ING AND MINING COMPANY. Hobart Town, 19th Dec., 1859. GENTLEMEN, - Having returned from Fingal we now beg to lay before you a brief report of our proceedings.
REPORT.
Report of Messrs John Davies and R. T. Edwards, Directors of the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company, specially sent by the Board of Directors to enquire into and investigate certain rumors relative to proceedings said to bo taking place at the Quartz Mines of the Company at Fingal.
1. Your Commissioners arrived at Fingal on Friday morning last and proceeded direct to the Aquacalcienta [sp?] Mines now being opened by Dr. Otway the Metallurgist of the Company.
2. On arriving at the Mines your Commissioners found the testing machine in full operation and the whole of the employees of the Company employed in various ways, some in cutting wood for the engine, some attending to the steam engine &c. &c. Watson, your Commissioners met going into Fingal for the purpose of procuring blasting powder, which article is in immediate request in order to continue the operations qf the Company.
3. Your Commissioners then proceeded to examine the nature of the works as well as the lower level of the reef which they ascertained by measurement to be a drive of five fathoms from the centre of the reef - the face of which had been that day opened and which, your Commissioners are happy to say, gives a highly auriferous and most satisfactory character to the whole reef. The drive is six feet four inches wide and ten feet in height. There had also been a cutting made of twenty-three feet to the end of the ridge and eleven feet six inches wide before the quarrying was commenced. The level in the drive is shielded with massive timbers and entirely roofed in to give security to the men employed in working it. The reef as it at present shows itself is about four feet four inches in width and about six feet in depth, and is easily distinguishable by the usual characteristics of the "walls" on either side. A substantial tramway of one hundred feet long has been laid down from this point and terminates at the back of the blacksmith's shop - a temporary building having been erected for that purpose.
4. Your Commissioners closely and cautiously examined the whole of the Company's works. The testing machine has been substantially fixed at about sixty yards from the banks of the creek, the creek having been capitally dammed and a sluice with small flood gates ingeniously contrived with the bark of the Eucalyptus which gives a never failing supply of water to the machine. To raise the water Dr. Otway has constructed a wooden pump which has been so connected with the machinery as to pump the water into the machine and keep it constantly supplied. Over the machine a temporary covering has been thrown, and at the back there is a self-acting hopper which, by another ingenious contrivance, keeps the machinery constantly supplied with quartz-thus saving the expense of one hand as feeder. A drain twelve inches wide and twenty deep carries off the whole of the refuse water and discharges it into the creek below the dam.
5. Dr. Otway is now engaged in crushing about ten tons of quartz taken from the crown of the reef, the result of which he purposes forwarding to the Board by the next mail. He will then proceed to test the reef now being opened.
6. Your Commissioners, after the most minute and cautious examination of these works, have come to fie deliberate conclusion that the whole of the rumors with regard to Dr. Otway's incapacity and neglect tire entirely without foundation; on the contrary they are clearly of opinion that Dr. Otway has exhibited a large amount of zeal and talent in carrying out the works entrusted to his care and that his conduct throughout has been characterised by a desire to advance the interests of the Company which is highly commendable.
7. Your Commissioners, however, are of opinion that there is not a sufficient number oí hands at present engaged and they recommend that an experienced captain of miners should be appointed with four or five good workmen to be placed under Dr. Otway in order to enable him to extend his operations. At the same time your Commissioners suggest that these appointments should not be made until after the Christmas holidays.
JOHN DAVIES, ROBT. T. EDWARDS.
Aquacalcienta Reef,
Dec. 19th, 1859.

GENTLEMEN, - I have the honor to inform you that I have crushed one ton of Quartz from the upper level or cap of this reef, (being the second test); the gold obtained I enclose. Although the quantity is small, the result is sufficiently satisfactory to convince me as to the quality of the material at a lower level, therefore I shall not crush any more until I get at least 5 tons lo commence upon, (from the drive), less than which I do not consider a sufficient test.
I have the honor to be,
Gentlemen,
Your obedient servant
W. B. OTWAY.[112]

December 28 THE SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING AND MINING COMPANY. (LIMITED.) THE above Company having been registered in accordance with the provisions of "The Joint Stock Company's Act," Shareholders are requested to call immediately at the Offices of the Company No. 3, Elizabeth street, for the purpose ot signing the Memorandum and Articles of Association. E. G. HOOKE, Secretary. Dec. 22.[113]

1860

January

January 10-12 SHARES. THURSDAY, the 12th JANUARY. BRENT & WESTBROOK Will sell by public auction, at their mart, Murray-street, on THURSDAY, the 12th January, at 1 o'clock, 25 Shares in the Union Bank of Australia. 40 Shares in the Der- went and Tamar Assurance Company AND 5 shares in the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company. [114]

January 13 MINERALS. Since our last Summary little or nothing has been done at Fingal. There is no sympathy in these Colonies between hard work and Christmas jollity. This good old English festival is kept up with as much spirit here as at home. Not all the seductions of gold finding could allure men from their festivities. Christmas week, for all practical business purposes, was a blank, and the two or three weeks succeeding were but a very little better. Now, however, that this great holiday is over our diggers are settling down quietly to their mining operations; and although no authenticated account of their labors has reached us, yet report gives out that they have commenced with renewed energy and that they have been rewarded, in several instances, with more than ordinary success. We are not without hope that during the next month or two the gold fields at Fingal will be efficiently tested. This has never yet been done. Those who have gone there have not got the means ot providing the rude but necessary machinery for getting rid of the water, so that, in no instance, we believe, has a hole been thoroughly bottomed. If by any stroke of luck a sufficient amount of gold should be obtained to induce men of small capital to turn their attention to these gold fields, the result would be, we have no doubt, highly satisfactory. But until this has been accomplished it will be vain to hope for any discoveries of a startling nature. Had the population of Tasmania possessed one tithe of the energy for which our neighbours are so conspicuous we should not now be occupying our present unenviable position. It is of no use endeavoring to induce us to throw off the unaccountable apathy which has got so firm a hold of our mental and bodily powers. The disease has penetrated too deeply into our system to be eradicated easily. The remedies necessary to conquer it would be worse in our estimation than the disease itself. We admit that all this is by no means flattering to us as a people. Could it, with justice to the Colony, have been concealed we should have gladly concealed it; but having so repeatedly expressed our strong convictions that portions of this Colony were highly auriferous we are bound, for the honor of our judgement, to account for the inexplicable neglect with which this important subject has been treated. In quartz crushing little or nothing has been done. The men in the employ of the Southern Tasmanian Company have been keeping Christmas like their neighbors. The new and powerful machinery of the Midland Company is almost ready, and the 1st of February has been set apart as a day of rejoicing to celebrate the commencement of operations. His Excellency Sir Henry Young has promised to honor Fingal with his presence on this interesting occasion, and the Shareholders of the Company have publicly invited all who take an interest in the great question which this machinery is destined to solve to participate in these festivities. That large numbers will visit Fingal should the weather prove propitious we have no doubt. The occasion is no ordinary one. It is one in which the whole community takes, or ought to take, a lively interest. Even with the imperfect machinery previously employed the returns were sufficiently encouraging to induce the Shareholders to invest a large sum of money in the purchase of their present powerful engines. There is scarcely any room, therefore, left for doubt as to the success of this spirited undertaking. The introduction of such expensive machinery into the Colony is a practical argument which cannot be got rid of by a sneer, a shrug of the shoulders, or an openly expressed doubt. We should like to see the man who could look these powerful engines in the face and coolly tell them and us that there was no gold in our quartz, and that, in importing such magnificent machinery from Sydney, the Midland Company had made a fool of the machines and of itself. Such a man would be a curiosity in his way. To our thinking the mere fact that such machinery has been purchased and introduced into the Colony is unanswerable evidence of our mineral wealth. But why need we speculate as to what will or will not be the actual result of this spirited enterprise when in two or three weeks we shall have the result itself placed unmistakeably before us? In our next monthly summary for transmission to Europe we shall be in a position to report the result of, at least, one week's operations; and, unless we are sadly deceiving ourselves; that result will give an emphatic contra- diction to those who persist in denying to this Colony a sufficient amount of mineral wealth to pay for the introduction of the costly machinery necessary for its realization. But it seems absurd to doubt of the existence of gold in Tasmania. Why should it not exist here as well as on the neighboring continent? We are brats of the same volcanic mother. But a very few miles divide us, and lest that short distance should destroy our family identity we have a chain of islands across the Straits to make our relationship indisputable. The auriferous 146th parallel which traverses the Continent of Australia crosses this island, and we know from our own experience that we have gold. The only question about which men differ is as to the quantity, and this is the question which has been tantalizing, and perplexing, and worrying us for the last six or seven years. To some extent, however, that question will be answered by the machinery of the Midland Company next month, and to its rollers and stampers we must leave it. That we are anxious we admit; that we are desponding we deny. Lying so close to Victoria we have been lost sight of in the blaze of light which has radiated from her. Even the brightest stars must hide their heads in the presence of the sun. But that is no reason why we should not be a very respectable and a very luminous planet in our own sphere. If our blazing neighbour were only eclipsed for a short time to give us fair play what a host of astronomical telescopes would be directed towards Tasmania! Until then we must be content to play "second fiddle" and make what subordinate music we can. It is quite possible for a Colony to be wealthy without being prosperous, and it is equally possible for a Colony to be prosperous without being wealthy. If it should prove, as we do not think it will, that Nature has cut us off with a shilling it will only stimulate us the more to depend upon our own industry and energy. The reward which these bestow may not be brilliant but neither is it capricious. If it do not bring us affluence it will, at all events, bring us contentment. [115]

January 30 IMPORTANT FROM FINGAL. DR. OTWAY writes in a very sanguine strain of the Aqua Callcienta Reef. He says in a letter dated on the 23rd:—I have tested portions from the vein every three feet since the Visiting Directors were here, and, although I have not at any time tested more than 4lbs. weight, yet I have three or four pennyweights of gold which I will send down with my report on Saturday. This may appear at first sight to be unimportant, but it is not so. Dr. OTWAY has driven in about thirty feet which would make the quantity of quartz tested about 40lbs weight altogether. Now this, even supposing that only three pennyweights had been obtained, would give a yield of seven ounces to the ton. We can scarcely hope that the reef will yield this all through. Two ounces to the ton would give a splendid return to the shareholders. We hope the Midland Company's Reef will turn out equally as well.[116] This extract was also printed in the Launceston Examiner.[117]

January 31 TO THE EDITOR OF THE MERCURY.
SIR,—In reference to your remarks on the Aqua Callicienta Reef, now in course of working by Dr. Otway for the Southern Company, should it turn out agreeably to your anticipations, I beg to inform you that the Yankee Company at Clunes, which yields two ounces to the ton of quartz, has netted £60 per week to each Shareholder; this return will be found in the Melbourne Herald of the 19th inst., let us indulge the hope that such a splendid return to the Shareholders will be realized, for the entire Colony will be benefitted.
Yours obediently, Z.
30th January, 1860.[118]

February

February 2 Otway is present at the opening of the Fingal Quartz Crushing Company (also referred to as the Midland Quartz Mining Company), responding to the toast to the Southern Tasmanian Mining Company (also referred to as the Hobart Town Company). [119][120][121] "The Chairman proposed success to the Hobart Town Company, and Dr Otway returned thanks, observing that they should be able to benefit by the experience of those who had begun first."[120] Another possible reference at [122]

February 6 On Saturday I proceeded to the scene of Dr. Otway's operations on behalf of the Hobart Town company. In a direct line the place is about a mile south or south-west of Mangana, and proceeding from Fingal you turn off at the Midland Company's works and pass along the southern slope of Specimen Hill. The ground as you proceed is strewn with fragments of slate or clay slate, and quartz. Dr. Otway's works are situated on the bank of a creek running through a retired and picturesque valley. The creek has been named "Aqua Callienta" (Sweet Water). The place looks like a small village. I found eight men, some of them with their families, at the place, in comfortable tents or huts. Dr. Otway was detained at Fingal on business, but he furnished me with a note to his deputy, Mr. Fulton, a very intelligent, practical man, who gave me a good deal of information. Dr. Otway discovered quartz containing gold on the slope of a hill which bounds the valley, and he is now making a "drive" with the expectation of hitting a valuable and extensive reef. He has already penetrated to stuff which yields gold; and if it should turn out that he is on the true reef it will probably equal that of the Midland Company. The stone is being tested every three feet as the "drive" advances, and each trial shows gold. These trials, indeed, I am assured by Dr. Otway, show a larger yield than Vallentine's Reef. Besides the test obtained by reducing a small quantity of the stone in a mortar, the company has one of Shuttleworth's 7-horse power portable engines and a battery of three stampers, with an amalgamator. Gold has been obtained at each washing. The engine was not going on Saturday, owing to the scarcity of water in the creek. The present operations are merely by way of prospecting, and they appear to be conducted on good principles. Dr. Otway has examined a large extent of country in the neighbourhood, and has a high opinion of its auriferous wealth. Some persons think him too sanguine and enthusiastic, and I am afraid he has somewhat impaired his usefulness by the warm tone in which he speaks of our prospects, - a line of conduct not calculated to assure the sceptics. His manners are frank and gentlemanly, and he seems to be a first-rate prospector for gold; indeed, quite up to that sort of thing. He has apparently an extensive acquaintance with the gold regions of the world, and with the appliances for developing their resources; indeed, he says he has seen all the known gold-fields from the Ural to Cape Horn. I cannot help thinking him just the sort of person we want here to prospect our gold-field; and as the doctor is now seriously at work on behalf of the Southern Company, he has no doubt discovered that however rich the locality on which he is engaged may be, it can only be turned to account by persevering exertion; and that work must give place to words. From the indications obtained by Dr. Otway, and the style in which he is proceeding, I hope that in a very short time the southern company will be in a position to imitate or surpass the example of the Midlanders.[123]Cite error: Closing </ref> missing for <ref> tag

February 7-9 THURSDAY, February 9th, 1860. Shares in the S.T.Q.C.C. M R. WORLEY. (Late Worley and Frodsham.) Will sell by auction, at the Mart, at Twelve o'clock, FIVE SHARES in the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing Company. Terms-Cash. [124]

February 13-20 The Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company, Limited. Ordinary General Meeting of Shareholders. A MEETING of SHAREHOLDERS will be held at Basstian's Hotel on WEDNESDAY, 22nd February, at 4 o'clock p.m. N.B.--No person is deemed to be a Shareholder who has not signed the Memorandum and Articles of Association [125]

February 18 Yesterday Dr. Otway forwarded to the Directors of the Quartz Company a small button of gold, the result of the experiments to determine the auriferous nature of the quartz. We are glad to hear that Dr. Otway is sanguine of the reef paying well when operations are commenced.—Advertiser.[126]

February 18 DR. OTWAY'S PROSPECTING PARTY.— The following letter has been received by the Chairman of the Southern Tasmanian Company, from their manager, Dr. Otway: —"Agua Calienta reef, 14th February, 1860. My Dear Sir,—Enclosed is a small quantity of gold from the banks of the Ben Lomond Rivulet. It is a small prospect from a few buckets of surface stuff, and indicates richer deposits at a greater depth. The machine still stands idle for want of water. The water in the creek is scarcely fit for drinking, except in one or two holes. I sincerely hope Heaven will soon send a supply. The Midland Company washed off on Saturday, and the result was not more than two or three ounces. This was altogether owing to the amalgamators not being fit, as well as a too great flood of water. One thing I am certain of—the gold is there, and only proper knowledge is required to make it a paying concern. I am, &c., W. B. OTWAY."[127]

February 21 FINGAL. [From our own Correspondent.] February 21, 1860. I have no doubt you will be expecting something grand from here this week, and I am sorry I must again disappoint you, but the truth is that at the washing off yesterday, very little (comparatively) gold was got. The answer to my enquiries was that "the yield was satisfactory, and as much as was expected;" but I had been previously told by one of the company that it was under five ounces. Another of the company told me that it was 300 per cent. over last week, which was 2 ozs. You will be able to calculate it. Mr. Manduit, the manager, has left, and Mr. Vallentine is acting, pro. tem., assisted by Dr. Otway, who, I believe, will ultimately take the helm. The Sluicing Company is broken up, owing to the exorbitant amount required by the Midland Company (£3 per week) for the use of their waste water. There are very few diggers left, and everything is relapsing to the state the diggings were in two years ago.[128]

February 23 SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING AND MINING COMPANY. An ordinary general meeting of members was held at Basstian's hotel, Argyle-street, yesterday afternoon, under the 19th clause of the articles of Association of the company. Among the members present were Mr. Alderman Lewis, Chairman of the Board of Directors, and Messrs. J. M. Wilson, Dr. Doughty, Haggitt, Davies, Sly, R. T. Edwards, C. O. Atkins, Smith, Wimbush, R. Worley, W. G. Beaumont, Morgan, Hebblewhite, G. Morgan.J. Hall, Walker, R. L. Hood, J. C. Hall, C. W. Hall, Cox, Middleton, Andrews, Petterd, Risby, Westcott, C. Basstian, Belbin, Wise, &c. On the motion of Mr Davies Mr. Lewis was appointed Chairman of the meeting. The Chairman drew attention to the section of their rules under which the meeting was held, and remarked that as the Secretary had received no notice of motion for this meeting, required by the 26th and 27th rules of the Company, the only business they could consider was the Report of the Directors, which he hoped would, under all circumstances, be considered satisfactory. The Secretary read the following Report—
(REPORT.)
The Directors of the S.T.Q.C.M.C. have called you together this day in accordance with the 19th Rule in the articles of Association of the above Co., and have deemed it advisable to lay before you for your satisfaction the following statement setting forth their proceedings since you elected them as Directors of the Company at the last general meeting.
They have had 46 meetings and the average attendance has been 12 Directors at each meeting.
In accordance with the recommendation of the Shareholders expressed at the general meeting your Directors lost no time in making a temporary engagement with Dr. Otway who forthwith proceeded to the Fingal District to commence the necessary prospecting arrangements, with a view to determining the spot which would be most suitable for future operations. He opened several supposed reefs and at length fixed upon one which he named the "Agua Caliente" reef, which by a report under date October 2nd, 1859, he stated was most favorable for the erection of any machinery that might be selected for the purpose of testing the auriferous character of the Quartz in this Colony.
Your Directors wishing to proceed with the utmost caution and economy in a matter involving the dearest interests of the Colony decided upon erecting testing Machinery only, until the favorable nature of the quartz to be operated upon should be ascertained with certainty, and accordingly procured a 7 Horse Shuttle- worth's Portable Engine from Melbourne, and a battery of Stamps from Clark & Clark, and after several unforeseen delays, the Plant was by a letter from Dr. Otway, received late in the year 1859, reported to be in working order at the scene of the Company's operations. Shortly after Dr. Otway writes, "I have crushed one ton of Quartz from the upper level or Cap of the Reef the Gold obtained I enclose; although the quantity is small the result is suffici- ent to convince me as to the quality of the material at a lower level, therefore I shall not crush any more until I get at least 5 tons to commence upon from the drive, less than which I do not consider a sufficient test."
This raised the expectations of your Directors, but when at a later date the Doctor wrote that the vein still kept improving, that he had tested the quartz at every 3 feet, and although only a few pounds had been used in each experiment sufficient gold had been obtained to test its auriferous character they hoped to have been able to give some decisive opinion to you this day as to the probability of the success of the Company at its first experiment.
But owing to an unusually dry season, just at the time we were entertaining these expectations, we hear from the Doctor that he had 30 or 40 tons of quartz ready burnt for crushing, but has no water to do so although he has sunk many holes to obtain it but in vain. In a later communication he says, "Some heavy rain on Saturday and Sunday, but not sufficient to commence crushing operations;" and by a communication received this day he says, "No rain yet which is much to be regretted as we are getting sufficient quartz to keep her working day and night." Your Directors have therefore only to lay before you the above statement and to quote from the weekly returns that the state of the Company's works is as follows.

A tunnel 61 feet long has been driven into the side of the hill and timbered throughout, from which has been taken about 40 tons of quartz, now ready for crushing. A tram-way has been laid down about 156 feet in length, connecting the reef with machinery. A bridge, 40 feet long and 10 feet wide, has also been built across the creek, connecting us with the Southern reef, or for use in pulling up large machinery. A dam has been built across the creek, and sufficient timbers have been cut to extend the tunnel another 60 feet. Opened another reef about 80 yards to the eastward of present workings, equally as bold and large as the one we are now at work on. The Company's claim has been duly registered. Water is now only wanted to commence operations.
Owing to the distance of the works from Hobart Town your Directors have thought it best for the interests of the shareholders to send one of their body at monthly intervals to check the reports received from time to time, and a special commission of two directors was sent for the purpose of combatting accusations that had been made, and their report proving the falsehood of such accusations was, for your information, published in the Hobart newspapers when received.
Under all the circumstances above detailed, and believing the delays enumerated to be unavoidable in the establishment of so novel an enterprize as Quartz Crushing in Tas- mania, your Directors have only in conclusion to draw your attention to the accompanying Financial Statement, and to state in reference thereto, that they have carefully watched over the expenditure of the funds, as men would naturally do who have so large a stake in the proprietary as they have themselves.
FINANCIAL STATEMENT.
2897 shares have been taken by 398 shareholders.
132 shareholders have signed the memo- randum and articles of association, representing—
1187 shares,
£2580 17s. 6d. has been received on ac- count of these shares, leaving a balance of £316 2s. 6d. due on the same.
The total amount of cash received to the 1st February is £2604 0s. 6d.
The expenditure as follows:—
£ s. d.
Machinery. 535 18 10 Mining expenses, tools, material, cartage, &c. 150 1 9
Wages 229 2 3
Management expenses including manager's salary, office furniture, stationery, office expenses, &c. 410 5 4
£1325 8 2
Leaving a balance of cash on hand, on 1st Feb., of £1278 12 4 Mr. Hood moved and Mr. Middleton seconded that the report be received and adopted and printed for distribution amongst the shareholders.
Mr. Andrews remarked that the amount expended was not so large as he expected, but the amount paid up was not so large either as he thought it would have been, and noticing the number of parties who had failed to sign the Articles of Association, expressed a hope that the advantages and responsibilities consequent on signing of the deed should be fairly made known.
The Chairman explained that no party was either responsible or could receive any benefit from the Company until he signed the articles and was not in fact a shareholder or member of the Company.
Mr. Wilson believed that those who had not signed would be only bound by the prospectus and could be sued by the Company for their share of the expenses. The Report he was glad to see so far well received as it contained only matters of fact, and showed that the greatest economy in the expenditure had been exercised. The Directors had gone only to a limited extent, and scrutineers, &c, had been appointed, so that not one sixpence had been spent not actually demanded. Their operations had now been retarded by the want of water, but he hoped the director- ship would shortly be in a position to meet the members again before the next general meeting. The Directors had used their best endeavors to promote the interests of the shareholders, had exercised the strictest economy in their expenditure and he hoped had done so to the satisfaction of the Company.
Mr. Davies was glad Mr. Andrews had raised the question as to the neglect of persons to sign the articles, and wished it to go forth that under certain circum- stances those who had not signed the articles rendered themselves liable to have the shares they had taken and the amount they had paid in forfeited at a special meeting to be convened for that purpose; and he only hoped that this might actuate as a fillip to those who had not signed the articles immediately to come forward and do so, and he hoped the members present would, therefore, use their influence individually with the parties referred to, and induce them to come forward as they had undertaken to do. For himself he was most sanguine from personal observation and experience of the result, and had the greatest hope that the Directors would shortly have the pleasure of laying a much more satisfactory report than this before the Members. The Directors had met great difficulties in consequence of the distance of the works, the difficulty of communication, &c, and the absence of personal inspection and verbal direction, but had exerted themselves to the utmost, and he hoped the report now presented would be passed without a dissentient voice. He had no doubt that the reef of this Com- pany would be equally rich with that of the Midland Company and that their operations would shortly be more successful.
Mr. Smith hoped when this report went abroad those who had not yet signed the articles would come forward and do so, but thought as large a number had signed as could have been expected when it was considered that a large number of shares had been allotted to women and children.
Mr Davies was aware that a large number of women and children had signed by their representatives.
The motion for adoption, &c, of the Report was then put and unanimously passed and the meeting separated.[129] An extract from the report was also reported in the Launceston Examiner[130] and a brief summary provided in The Hobart Town Daily Mercury.[131]

February 28 - 1 March MR. WORLEY (Late Worley and Frodsham) Will sell by auction without reserve, No. 5 & 6 TWO ALLOTMENTS situated in Elizabeth-street, Mangana, each having an area of 19 perches and 2-10. ALSO Five Shares in the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company. Terms-Cash. [132]

April

April 12 The Hobart Town Company has suspended operations...[133]

May

May 10 Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company Limited. THE Directors of the above Company hereby convene an EXTRAORDI- NARY GENERAL MEETING of the Shareholders, lo take place at the Bird-in Hand, Argyle-streel, on Friday, 28th instant, at 4 o'clock, p.m., at which meeting the following Resolution will be proposed :- " That this Company be wound up without delay." E. G. HOOKE, Secretary, Hobart, 10th May, 1860. [134]

May 26 SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING AND MINING COMPANY, LIMITED.
An extraordinary general meeting of the Shareholders of this Company was held yesterday afternoon at the Bird-in-Hand, Argyle street, to consider the following resolution:— That this Company be wound up without delay.
There was a large attendance of Shareholders, and Mr. D. Lewis took the chair. The Chairman briefly explained the object of the meeting, but invited any Shareholder to offer suggestions to continue the Company; he then called upon the Secretary to read the Report of the Directors.
The Report having been read, Mr. W. C. D. Smith moved that the meeting be adjourned for a week, and that the Report which had been read, with all correspondence and minutes of the Directors be in the meantime laid on the table of the office for the inspection of the Shareholders. In moving the resolution he did not suppose that any opposition would be offered.
Mr. Davies.—I shall oppose one part of it.
Mr. Smith was not surprised at that, as that gentleman had told him he should oppose the motion, (Hear, hear, from Mr. Davies.) He proposed it, however, but not without fear and trembling. They had been told that a gentleman had gone up to Fingal, and they had been told what he saw, but they had not been told all that he did; that was not embodied in the Report. That gentleman had declared that Mr. Fulton was not competent to manage the Company's works, and yet he had told Mr. Fulton to go on with them; that did not say much for the gentleman's competency.
Mr. Davies was here speaking to a Director near him, when Mr. Smith said: I say it's true. Mr. Davies explained that he was merely asking a brother Director whether a certain circumstance was true.
Mr. Smith continued and was proceeding to comment upon the conduct of Dr. Otway, when Mr. Pettard referred to the Report, and to some remarks made by Mr. Smith. Mr. Smith begged pardon, he was speaking on a matter not embodied in the Report; they might misunderstand him; but that was not his fault. He maintained that there were matters which ought to have been in the Report, and he maintained also, that they ought to adjourn in order that the shareholders should inspect the correspondence. He believed that there were some letters which would prove a disgrace to any man, and when he, Mr. Smith, applied for a copy of them, oh no, he was refused. He contended that the meeting ought to be adjourned in order that the Shareholders should know what had been done, and how it had been done, (Ironical cheers from Mr. Davies) and if it had not been done properly, to get those who would do justice to their interests. They had a right to obtain all information from the directors, and if they respected themselves they would not oppose a full exposition of their proceedings, Mr. Smith moved his resolution, and after a pause Mr. Hall, sen., seconded. Mr. Pettard here suggested that if the meeting were adjourned it should be held at 7 o'clock in the evening as more convenient to many who could not leave their business at an earlier hour.
Mr. Davies moved the adoption of the Report as an amendment to the original motion, and was proceeding to address the meeting when Mr. Smith rose to order; he said the course was irregular as a motion for adjournment ought to be put at once. (Laughter and cries of "Chair.) The Chairman said the motion for adjournment must be put without debate. Mr. Morgan observed that the motion was not for adjournment only; it comprised other matters. Mr. Davies was just coming to that; had the motion been merely for adjournment he should have offered no objection, but there was a motion for the production of certain documents, which made it an open question, and which he intended to oppose.
A Shareholder—Make the motion for adjournment first.
Mr. Davies had no objection to that.
Some interruption here took place, and the Chair was appealed to. Mr. Smith said it would be no use to adjourn if the Shareholders could not examine the correspondence and minutes. Mr. Hebblewhite could see no objection to the production of the books and papers, for he felt quite convinced that there was not a single document to be ashamed of. Mr. Middleton thought there might be something wrong, and that the Shareholders had a right to the fullest information; he thought there was something wrong because a party had been refused to see some letters.
Mr. Davies rose to order; an accusation had been made by the last speaker based on a refusal to exhibit some letters. It would be much better if gentlemen instead of braying would talk of matters they could understand. He ought to have known that by the rules of the Company no letters were to be submitted indiscriminately to the inspection of the Shareholders.
Mr. Pettard hoped the meeting would go on quietly, and deprecated the use of the term "braying" as applied by one gentleman to another (derisive cheers, and oh! oh!); the Shareholders were not to insult the Directors, nor the Directors the Shareholders.
The Chairman now put the motion, which was met by cries of "divide."
Mr. Andrews hoped that a motion of this kind would not be passed without discussion; it would not be right to the Shareholders to pass it in such a manner. Cries of "chair," "order," and uproar. The Chairman again put the motion; he observed that a mere motion for adjournment could be passed without discussion, but this motion contained a qualification. Mr. J. M. Wilson thought the motion was of an open nature, and that the latter part called for discussion.
Mr. Andrews was very sorry to find that their dreams of gold had vanished, and with respect to the management he was prepared to say that there was either a great amount of stupidity or ignorance on the part of the employees of the Company (hear), and to call for a dissolution without enquiry would be unjust to the Shareholders. Money had been expended, and nothing had been done to show that Fingal was a gold country, and if a dissolution took place without a knowledge of what had been done, he repeated it would be unjust. He had paid £5, which he could ill afford, but he would expend it most willingly if he knew that the work had been well done; they were told that the very prosperity of the colony depended upon it, and he, therefore, hoped there would be honesty enough, sincerity enough, and straightforwardness enough, to allow the shareholders to examine the documents, for they were as well able to judge of them as the Directors. Would they allow this? It was not that he suspected the Directors, but he wished to remove all cause of suspicion (Cheers).
Mr. Davies said, that when the question of producing the papers was first mooted, the speaker who introduced the subject failed to convince him of the necessity of such a course, but the last speaker had sufficient common sense to convince him that it was necessary. He, for one, and he believed some others of the Directors, felt assured that there was not an entry made by them in the minutes, or one referring to them, which would not be found perfectly satisfactory, and he freely invited the most jealous scrutiny, being well satisfied of the result. The fact was that the Directors had been over-zealous, and their zeal had blinded their judgment; they thought that Fingal would prove a panacea for all their ills, but unfortunately it had turned out a lamentable failure. He knew this from other sources, and had proof that men with honest talent, and not cupidity had failed in ensuring success; he need only refer to the Midland Company as a proof of lamentable failure, involving some in actual ruin, this was so true that he defied any one to contradict it, for the exertions of this Company had signally failed. Now the reef of this Company was within a mile of their land, and he, Mr Davies, when he first visited Fingal had no doubt of the assimilation of the two reefs, the indications being precisely similar in each. He had no doubt that gentleman (Mr. Smith) in the excess of his wisdom—Loud cries of "chair," "order." Mr. Davies explained, and apologised for allowing himself to be ruffled, and diverted from the right course. It was almost unnecessary to illustrate the capabilities of Fingal, but murder would sometimes come out, and a little had escaped the gentleman near him; "Oh!" said he, "if the Directors can't do the work, let us get those that can, let the present Directors resign." But he, Mr Davies, thought that the Shareholders would hesitate before they trusted their pounds or even their shillings to men who could not conduct their own business, or pay their own way.
Mr. Andrews rose to order; Mr. Davies was travelling out of the course of debate. Mr Davies—It seemed that these observations were out of the legitimate course of debate, and he would therefore confine himself more strictly within its proper limits. He maintained that there was not a paper connected with the Company that would not beat the most rigid examination, while the minutes contained every item necessary for the information of the shareholders. The Directors had a larger stake than the general Shareholders, and had not used any portion of the funds but for the most legitimate purpose. Allusion had been made to the expenditure made by him on his visit to Fingal; he could only say that he was allowed £8 and his accounts would show that he expended £12, although he was as economical as possible. (Cries of "chair," "adjourn," "come to the point.") He intended to have entered at great length into the affairs of the Company in order to remove any erroneous opinions that might exist in the minds of the Shareholders, but he should for the present abandon his intention.
Mr. Middleton explained that he intended to say that an inspection of the correspondence would remove any suspicion, and Mr. W. C. D. Smith having addressed a few words in reply, the motion for adjournment was put from the Chair, and carried. A vote of thanks was given to the Chairman, and the meeting dispersed.[135]

May 11 SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING COMPANY. It will be seen by an advertisement in another column that the Board of Directors of the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing Company have convened an Extraordinary General meeting of the shareholders to be held at the Bird-in- hand on Friday the 26th instant at four o'clock when a resolution will be submitted to the effect that the Company be wound up without delay. Quartz crushing here, as in Victoria, has not proved a remunerative enterprise. Large sums of money have been lost on the other side of the Straits by those who have embarked in it. We believe the Shareholders of this Company will have reason to be highly pleased with the conduct of the Directors who have, from the first, manifested an earnest desire to husband the funds entrusted to their hands. It is no fault of theirs that the enterprise has failed. Under present circumstances we think the proposal to dissolve the Company is about the wisest that could be made.[136]

June

June 1 SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING COMPANY. An adjourned meeting of the members of the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing Company was held at Mr. Basstian's, Bird-in-hand, Argyle-street, last evening when the report of the Directors, recommending that the affairs of the Company should be wound up, in the terms of the Joint Stock Companys Act, was, after a lengthened and some- what stormy debate, carried with only one dissentient.[137]

June 2 HOBART TOWN. The Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing Company is to be dissolved.[138]

June 11-20 The Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company, (Limited.) TENDERS will be received at the Office of this Company, Hobart Town, on or before WEDNESDAY, the 20th instant, at 12 o'clock, noon, for the Plant belonging to the Company, consist ing of—
1 Seven-horse power Clayton and Shuttleworth's Portable Steam Engine, with reversing gear
1 Three-stamp Battery
3 Spare Stamp Heads
Amalgamator, Retort, and Ingot Mould
3 Tents
1 Large Flag
Blacksmith's Forge,
Anvil, Vice, &c.
Quantity of Mining Tools
About 51lbs Mercury
About 112lbs blasting powder
Quartz Waggon
Grindstone
Lot of Timber, &c., &c.
Now lying on the Company's Claim situated at Mangana. Full particulars of the above can be obtained at the Office of the Company. The Directors do not bind themselves to accept the highest or any Tender. By Order of the Board of Directors. D. LEWIS, Chairman. June 9. [139]

June 12 There is but little to report respecting the auriferous districts. The operations of the Midland Quartz Crushing Company are suspended for the present, and the share- holders of the Southern Quartz Crushing Company have passed a resolution for dis- solving the company. Some few alluvial diggers are, however, at work in the Fingal district.[140]

July

July 3 SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING AND MINING COMPANY. —An extraordinary general meeting of the Shareholders of this Company will be held at Basstian's Hotel, Argyle-street, at 7 o'clock this evening, for the purpose of confirming the resolution passed at the last meeting "that the Company be wound up," and for the appointment of Liquidators to carry out the object of such resolution in accordance with the Joint Stock Companies' Act. [141]

July 4 SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING AND MINING COMPANY. AN Extraordinary General Meeting of Sharehold ers was held at Basstian's Hotel, Argyle-street, yesterday evening, for the purpose of confirming the resolution passed at the last meeting, "that the Company be would up," and for the appointment of Liquidators to carry out the object of such resolution in accordance with the Joint Stock Companies' Act. There had previously been held a meeting of the Directors of the Company at which an unanimous vote of thanks had been passed to David Lewis, Esq., Chairman of the Board, for the skill, ability, and untiring industry with which that gentleman had performed the various duties of his office, including the conduct of the portion of an extensive correspondence. The extraordinary General Meeting was very unanimously attended, and amongst the Directors and Shareholders present were Messrs. the Hon. J. M. Wilson, G Marshall, Esq., M. H. A., elect; Dr Doughty, D Lewis, J. Davies, R. Worley, J. Symons, D'Arcy Haggitt, J. Hall, W. Simpson, A. Gellie, Cookney, Andrews, Heron, Saunders, Wim- bush, Willing, J. Drake, &c., &c Mr. D. Lewis the chair. The Minutes of the last meeting having been read and confirmed, The Chairman said the object of the present meeting, which was called in accordance with the Joint Stock Companies Act, was that they might confirm or otherwise the resolution passed at the previous meeting, that "the Company be wound up." On the motion of Mr. Andrews, seconded by Mr. Worley, it was resolved that that resolution be con- firmed. The motion was passed, Mr. Hall, senior, alone dissenting. A vry lengthy discussion arose as to the number of liquidators to be appointed to carry out the object of the resolution, and as to the amount of the remuneration which they should be paid, and it was at length resolved, on the motion of Mr. Worley, that three liquidators be appointed, on the motion of Mr. Davies that the amount of remuneration do not exceed £5 each, and on the motion of Mr. Saunders, that Mr. D. Lewis, Mr. Gellie, and Mr Andrews be appointed liquidators. On the motion of the Hon. Mr. Wilson, seconded by Mr. Simpson, it was resolved unanimously that the Hon. Mr. Nairn be appointed inspector. On the motion of Mr. Andrews, seconded by Mr. Potter, it was resolved unanimously that a vote of thanks be given to the Directors for the satisfactory and able manner in which those gentlemen had performed their difficult and delicate duties and the interest they had taken to benefit the Share- holders, which was acknowledged by Mr Lewis, Chairman of the Board, on behalf of himself and the other members of the Board, and a vote of thanks having been passed to the Chairman of this evening's meeting the shareholders separated.[142][143]

July 10-25 he Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crush- ing and Mining Company. (limited.) THE LIQUIDATORS of this COMPANY hereby invite TENDERS for the purchase of the ENGINE, MACHINERY, TOOLS, MERCURY, STORES. &c., &c., the property of the COMPANY, as the same now lies at the works near Mangana, full particulars of which can be obtained on application at the Company's Office, Hobart Town. SEPARATE TENDERS will be received for the ENGINE, and for the MACHINERY, STORES, &c., or for the whole in one lot. Especial attention is directed to the ENGINE, a 7-horse power portable (by Clayton and Shuttleworth) with reversing gear and double shafts; nearly new, and in perfect order; suitable for agricultural purposes, or well adapted for a saw or flour mill. TENDERS will be received at the Office of the Company until 11 o'clock on WEDNESDAY, 25th instant. E. G. HOOKE, Secretary. July 7. [144]

July 16-19 Thursday, 19th July. Office Furniture, &c., of the late Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing Company. MR. WORLEY Will sell by auction, at the Mart, On THURSDAY July 19th, 1860, At 12 o'clock, WITHOUT RESERVE. THE following articles of OFFICE FURNI- TURE, all in excellent order Eighteen horse hair chairs Three American do Horse hair office do Large cedar office desk and pigeon holes Large cedar office table Clock and gas chandelier Fender and irons Drugget and hearth rug Copying press and stand, map of Tasmania Mats, inkstand, letter box, &c., &c. Terms—Cash.[145]

October

October 26 - November 8 Thursday, November 8th, I860. IMPORTANT NOTICE. Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company, Limited. The Liquidators of the above Company have instructed MR. WORLEY To sell by public auction, At the Mart, Elizabeth-street, On THURSDAY, November 8th, 1860, At half past 11 for 12 o'clock, THE ENGINE, MACHINERY, TOOLS, and MATERIAL, now at the Company's Works, at Fingal, a particular description of which can be seen at the Mart. The whole will be sold in one lot and delivered at Mangana. Terms —Cash, or approved bills, at 3 and 6 months, with bank interest. [146]

1861

January 28 SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING COMPANY. TO THE EDITOR OF THE MERCURY. SIR, —It is now some months since this Company ceased to exist, and Liquidators were formally appointed to wind up the affairs, and to declare a dividend. May I ask what has been done in the matter, and when we may expect a dividend? I came forward readily to assist in the work of the Company, and I am not particularly desirous to lay out of my money, however much or however little it may be, longer than may be necessary. Your's, A SHAREHOLDER. Hobart Town, 26th January, 1861.
In reply to our Correspondent we may state that we have received similar enquiries from other Shareholders. As our Correspondent observes, it is some time since the Liquidators were appointed, and it is quite time that their Report should be forthcoming, and a dividend declared.[147]

January 29 SOUTHERN TASMANIAN QUARTZ CRUSHING COMPANY. TO THE EDITOR OF THE MERCÜRY. Sir,-In answer to the inquiry of a "Share- holder," I beg to reply that the last case in dispute, namely, " Heavey v, the Company," is now before Mr. J. C. Gregson, the Arbitrator, for adjudication ; that at the last hearing an adjournment was agreed to at the request of the plaintiff; an early appointment for final hearing is anxiously expected. Immediately judgment is given the accounts will be made up and forwarded to the gentleman appointed to inspect them; at the conclusion of such inspection a general meeting will be called at the earliest possible period. The liquidators are equally anxious with the shareholders to bring the affairs of the Association to a conclusion, and hope to show the delay has not been occasioned by any want of energy or honesty on their parts. I have felt it due to " A Shareholder" and yourself to offer this explanation, your insertion of which will oblige. Your's respectfully, ONE OF THE LIQUIDATORS.[148]

March 23 The winding up of the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company is approaching completion, the accounts, under the direction of the Liquidators being ready for submission to the Inspector, Mr. Nairn, on his return to town. The meeting required by the Act will then have to be convened when the somewhat long winded settlement will be ratified and the surplus assets apportioned to the expectant members.[149]

March 28 – April 29 The Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing and Mining Company, limited, A GENERAL MEETING of the Share- holders of this Company will be held at the Bird in-Hand, Argyle street, on MONDAY, the 29th April next at 7 o'clock p m. for the purpose of considering the Liquidators' Accounts. By Order of the Liquidators, E. G. HOOKE, Secretary. [150]

May 22 A MEETING of the shareholders of the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing Company was held on the 29th ultimo, at Bastiann's Hotel, to receive the reports of the liquidators, verified by the inspector, Mr. Middleton in the chair. The report was received and adopted, and thanks tendered to the liquidators, Messrs. Andrews, Gellie, and Lewis, and Mr. Nairn, the inspector, and acknowledged. Thanks having also been passed to the chairman, the meeting broke up. It is expected that a dividend of 5s, on each share will be paid back to the shareholders.[151]

November 9 ORIGINAL CORRESPONDENCE. As a general rule the Editor does not identify himself with the opinions or expressions of Correspondents. To the Editor of the Cornwall Chronicle. FINGAL GOLD FIELDS: AN UNAPPRO- PRIATED SOURCE OF INDUSTRY AND WEALTH. Mr Editor,— In the name of common sense what are we apathetic good folks of Launceston about, with such dull times, such a stagnation of trade, and such poor prospects for our best customers— the Farmers, with such a source of wealth asu the Gold Field of Fingal at our very door, only waiting to be develop- ed and yet not so? The answer can only be that we have become thoroughly disheartened by the shameful mismanagement of parties sent up there to develop the gold field spoken of, and yet if you will allow me, I think I can show you how we may yet open up what I conceive to be a splendid gold field, and make us the envy of our hitherto more fortunate neighbours. I can speak with confidence from many visits to the Fingal Gold Field as one of the Directors of the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing Company, from considerable working experience in the Gold Fields of Victoria, and my own knowledge of gold digging generally that, as yet, not one hole has been sunk and bottomed at Fingal; and let me ask is this the test to develop a gold field? Any one but a fool would answer No! Now with regard to Fingal, what has been done? Why a few poor men have been occasionally en- gaged in what may truly be called 'fossicking' or surfacing and nothing more, and the rea- son was, that they were unable to purchase the necessary machinery to enable them to carry on deep sinking, which deep sinking would necessitate constant pumping to keep down the water. Every digger who has seen Fingal looked with longing eyes on Mangana Flat or valley, for into this Flat run all the gullies for miles around and across which gullies runs quartz dykes or reefs, but the truth is not a hole has been sunk there and bottomed because it was found impossible to sink to the requisite depth without the aid of steam machinery, the anticipated depth precluding the use of the hand pumps. From what I have read and heard I firmly believe we shall find Mangana Flat similar to Gabriel's Gully in New Zealand for richness perhaps much richer, for as in Gabriel's Gully so at Mangana all the gullies around it, are known and proved to contain considerable quantities of gold empty and have poured their treasures into its lap which untold ages have covered with alluvial soil. My opinion is we thall find this difference however between Gabriel's Gully and Mangana in its greater depth making it like the wet diggings of Ballarat, perhaps not so deep, but rivalling those in richness and requiring just as much the aid of steam machinery as they did to keep down the water. That we have here a source of great wealth no sane man can deny (all geologists assert it) and we can, I feel assured by the outlay of a few hundred pounds at most, find a profitable occupation for some hundreds, perhaps thou- sands, of persons who will thus become consumers of produce grown by our farmers and graziers not living on them, but by their work increasing the value of all farm and other produce, and thus make for the growers of cereals and other produce, meat &c., a market within our own borders, and render us independent of our neighbors, as I am afraid this season will make them of us. I conceive it to be the duty of every man in this Colony who would save it from ruin to do all in his power to further the development of this gold field, and now, Mr Editor, I would advise that a party be formed of really practical hard working men (diggers) not to be daunted by trifles, say ten in number, in charge of one from amongst us, who has as deep an interest in the matter, as ourselves, a character at stake, and his fellow citizens to meet on his return. Let subscriptions be raised to the amount ot £500, and let such a party as I have described be sent up to Fingal as soon as carefully organized, provided with a small steam engine and every necessary appliance; an engine can be hired in this town in good working order for £2 per week; let such engine be placed on any part of the diggings, considered best for all purposes, and I will answer for the result, it would I am sure, be such as to astonish the most sanguine, raise our drooping energies, and make Tasmania, as I said before, the envy of our rich neighbors. Is not such a consummation worth an effort, is it not worth a long pull, a strong pull, and a pull altogether? And now, with regard to another thought which strikes me, my conviction is that a few miles before you arrive on the township of Fingal, to the right and on the ground at present occupied on lease from the Government, we have to all appearance as good a gold field (dry diggings) as any in Victoria. The country is the most promising in appearance I have ever seen, and with regard to our Quartz reefs, from a reef not 60 yards from the reef worked by Dr. Otway, I have seen 10 to 12 dwts. to the ton with abundance of wood and water. Would Victoria believe it? No! They don't let such sources of wealth lie idle there. The Gold found at Fingal is coarse and nuggetty. I have seen much gold there larger than horse beans, and in no part of the colony have I seen so great a resemblance to Victoria diggings as there, it seems to me a very paradise Quartz reef, everything to tempt a digger to dig, gold found in all the gullies around, Quartz reefs intersecting these gullies, what want we more? Why simply a strong party of really practical men determined that no obstacle shall daunt them, that as gold (geo- logically determined) must be there in abundance they will find it. May I ask if the £2000 allowed by the government some years since was all spent, and if not so, have we not a claim on them to supplement what we may raise among our- selves? I think we can spend any left to better purpose than before. I saw on the 17th of October last, a very excellent article in the 'Mercury' of that date, regarding our gold field at Fingal, well worthy of re-insertion. I am, Mr Editor, Your's faithfully, ROBT. T. EDWARDS, Brisbane street. Launceston, 5th Nov., 1861 [152]

1862

April 23 FINGAL GOLD FIELDS. Mr R T. Edwards of Brisbane Street, who has had great personal experience on the Fingal Gold Fields paid another visit to them last week, and his non-official verbal report, of what he saw there is highly encouraging. He found the men belonging to the Launceston Gold Digging Association at work at a point farther from Tower Hill than he would have selected himself, but after what he saw he highly approved of the locality, and advised the men to persevere with the holes they were sinking, one of these was about twenty three feet deep, and the earth was of that firm description that the men could drive and test in all directions as they went down. The Eclair Company, consisting of six working partners, he considers deserving of great praise and perfect success. They have applied the engine of the Southern Tasmanian Quartz Crushing Company to working an American or chain pump, which answers so well that it throws out about twenty tons of water an hour from their claims. These consist of two wide holes, or as they term them paddocks— each about twelve feet square. One of these had been sunk to a considerable depth, when it was inundated by the late rains, and nothing short of the chain pump and engine could have cleared it out. They have an excellent fall for the water, which races off as it is thrown out. The Eclair Company have obtained about ten ounces of gold from this claim lately, and they are in a fair way of working ahead until they make their pile. Gaynor's Victorian party from Hobart Town speak very favorably of the places they have prospected. Mr Edwards noticed several old faces on the diggings, who are now — as they were six years ago — content to fossick about for a fortnight or so at a time for sufficient gold to procure them the means of living, about the same time or longer in idleness. Gold fossicking is their only means of support; and as that is really the case, surely straightforward energetic gold digging in the sane locality will be found to pay? A number of amateur diggers of respectable positions in life, are preparing to start on their own resources from Launceston and other places for Mangana. As the avocation of gold digging becomes more successful, it also becomes more fashionable, and in a short time a season at the Fingal diggings will be considered necessary to complete the education of a Tasmanian native youth. A special meeting of the Launceston Gold Digging Company was held in the Mechanics' Institute yesterday afternoon, when in consequence of offers having been made to the Company by persons prepared to undertake to purchase and send in from the Fingal Gold Fields fifty ounces per weak, it Committee consisting of Messrs Cohen. Irvine, Tyson, Williams and other members was appointed to consider and report upon the proposal to the General Committee.[153]

October 3 It is true there are men of sound discretion and large experience amongst ourselves, who have still unshaken faith in the auriferous resources of Fingal. As the summer weather becomes settled, the number of diggers on that ground will increase, and our banks and merchants will again begin to receive their remittances of gold. A strong impression prevails too, that the quartz at Fingal has never yet been adequately tested. Until the fatal mistake committed by the Midland Company in the erection of machinery which, notwithstanding its costliness, was of a character that had been condemned on all the gold fields of New South Wales and Victoria, the quartz was found to yield a fair return of gold by the use of comparatively rude and simple apparatus. The fatal mistake of the Midland Company was followed by the mismanagement of the affairs of the Southern Tasmanian Association—owing chiefly to the unfortunate engagement of Dr. OTWAY, a mere charlatan, who has just got into the same disrepute in connection with the new silver mines of Moruya that he fell into here. It will be seen from a telegraphic despatch we published yesterday, that quartz crushing operations are about to be resumed under the superintendence of Mr. NEVINS, with the old machinery. And hopes are not unreasonably entertained, that these resumed operations will establish beyond doubt the fact of the existence of paying auriferous quartz in the Fingal district.[154]

December 10 FINGAL. (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.) Saturday, 6th Dec., 1862. Since my last letter the gold from the quartz has been— 27th Nov., 4oz. ; 1st Dec., 2½ oz. ; 4th Dec. 5½ oz. I should have corrected a misrepresentation in the Mercury. The gold has not been got from using any part of the splendid and powerful machinery of the Midland Quartz Company, but from the small seven horse power Engine and three stampers formerly the property of the Southern Tasmanian Company. I have twice this week visited the Quartz Works, and find Messrs. Nevins, Jessop, and McLay making every possible exertion to perfect the work they have in hand. Since Friday the Engine has been stopped to enable the new stampers to be made and fixed; they are so far completed that they will be in full work on Monday. Their weight and power will give at least 60 per cent increase of crushed stuff. I also went to the Reef. The quartz hitherto crushed has been principally from near the surface. A shaft 32 feet deep has been struck on a portion of the Reef apparently of much greater value than any other before crushed in the neighbourhood. I much regret the machinery of the Midland Company is not at work. The results to this neighbourhood and the colony at large would be most beneficial. Mr. Bennett and party arrived here on Thursday last, and Mr. Edwards and party this day. Both proceed to the Black Boy. The Annual Licensing Meeting took place on the 1st inst. The following li- censes were granted without opposition: Thomas Coffin, George's Bay. George Pineo, Falmouth. H. B. Yates, Tasmanian Inn, Cullenswood. John Bailey, Woolpack, Avoca. C. R. Foster, Victorian Hotel, Avoca. Robert Viney, Tasmanian Hotel, Fin- gal. John Gatty, Talbot Arms, Fingal. William Duncan, for a new house, the Prince of Wales Hotel, Fingal. [155]

1863

April 8 GOLD MINING AT FINGAL. TO THE EDITOR OF THE MERCURY. SIR,—The article in your paper of the 20th inst., on the subject of Quartz Mining lately prosecuted at Fingal, the yield of gold obtained from quartz crushed, and other matters connected therewith, leads me to address you at an earlier date than I anticipated, on a matter which I believe to be of vast and incalculable importance to the future of this Island. It is now nearly three years, since a letter of mine on the subject of "Quartz Mining of Tasmania" appeared in the Melbourne Colonial Mining Journal. You will find it in the No. for October, 1860. The opinions therein expressed have been but confirmed by my later experience. Now that a little, and a very little has been done here lately in the way of quartz mining and crushing, and the extraction of gold from the ore, a few people are beginning to open their eyes, and wonder, and ask themselves why it is that the same business, (all things being equal) that yield a profit in Victoria will not yield a profit here? There is no answer to the question, for there is no why, in it. Had those who entered into this enquiry more than three years since, with capital at command, quietly and patiently persevered, hopefully prosecuting their mining adventures, (as is done else- where) this would have been a flourishing district before now; and there would have been no occasion for your article of the 20th inst. So far as I am concerned in all connected with this matter, (for the most obvious reasons) I am anxious that no mis-statements on any point should attain credence. With your leave, I will, therefore, here supply a few facts, which will afford correct information on the subject. The only quartz mining and quartz crushing operations that have been undertaken in this district within the last year, I have been engaged in. That which I am now working at, is for proof of the value of the lode known as Seddon's Reef in Grant's Creek, situated on land owned by F. A. Downing, Esq. The only machinery used here for crushing quartz within the past year, is the eight horse-power steam-engine, and the small three stamp- battery attached thereto—formerly belonging to the S. T. Q. M. Company, and was first erected by, or for Dr. Otway. By various alterations it has, (since its last erection), been made equal to reducing over thirty tons of quartz per week. No part of the Midland Company's machinery (new or old) has been employed at all, in anything done here within the time named, or in the tests you refer to. That which has been doing here during the past few months, in the matter of quartz mining and crushing, and extraction of gold from the ore, is best attested by the amount of gold sent to Hobart Town up to a certain date. It speaks for itself in simple truth, and requires no argument beyond comparison with similar adventures, regard being had to difference of circumstance. Neither in the "first instance", or afterwards, during these operations, was any one, " miner of great practical experience", or otherwise, "procured from Melbourne", or anywhere else, who "crushed twenty tons of quartz, and attained four oz. of gold" therefrom. Twenty tons of quartz, yielding, at the rate of, four dwts. of gold per ton, is very well, as far as it goes, but the test is too small, and does not do justice to the reef that has been so far worked. One hundred tons, yielding an average of six dwt. per ton, is of ten times more consequence and value as a test, and this yield has been had from the first hundred tons of quartz, crushed by the little ma- chine ; with—as you correctly observe—"very imperfect appliances at command," wherewith to secure gold in an exceedingly minute state of subdivision. Now, had the "experienced miner" only got thirty ounces of gold from one hundred tons of quartz, raised moreover from within less than forty feet of the surface, he would have been at least fifty per cent. more than "entirely satisfied with his success," and would but wonder how the people of this country had let it lie there so long unearthed. Still, it is but right to state, that the lode is not yet explored, or opened far enough to make a safe estimate of its value as to quantity of quartz, and average yield of gold. I here give you a memorandum of five parcels of quartz, with gross and average yield of gold per ton, mined and crushed at Eagle Hawk, Maldon, (Tarrangower) Victoria.
Gross Yield.
Tons. Oz. dwt.
335........ 12 14
165........ 20 0
177........ 30 18
446....... 75 0
552........86 13
1665.....225 5
Average yield per ton, 2dwt. 17gr.
Compare this statement, (and it is but one of many similar) with what has been done here lately, the thing speaks for itself. True, there, they had powerful machinery, and choice of gold saving and amalgamating machines. We know all about these things here too, but can't afford to get them yet. Some time ago several tons of quartz were raised from this same lode and parcels were sent to either Sydney or Melbourne, for the purpose of being tested. I have been informed that little or no gold was found therein,—in fact the reef was considered worthless. This was the opinion of Professor Nisser of South America, and of Mr. Manduit. In September, 1861, I first examined Seddon's Reef, and from two small tests of stone, that presented no gold visible, with a magnifier of ten diameters, I obtained yields at the rate of nine and 11 dwts. per ton. Tests of stone with gold visible gave much higher rates, but these latter were thrown out, —they are always unsafe guides, even in very uni- form ore. What I have just stated, shows how easily one may be deceived by trusting to small tests,—also that for want of means of reducing the ore on the spot, a lode that would pay well for working, may be (as this has once been) abandoned. At Ballarat the Black Hill Company was some time since understood to work to a profit at less than 3 dwts. per ton. The Perseverance Company (I think), Dead Horse Gully, stated a profit with a yield of no more than l dwt. 16 grs. per ton. By dealing with large quantities of ore, the cost per ton for mining, crushing, and gold saving very much reduced; but granting that these things are as stated, I have only to add, that here, with no more than from eighty to ninety tons of quartz per week to deal with, mined from a lode at the surface and to 150 feet deep, of no greater dimensions than the one now being worked here—that is from two to four feet in transverse section, and if at all favorably situated for working, the small average yield of 4 dwts. of gold per ton of quartz, will give a profit of 1 dwt. of gold per ton for every ton of quartz dealt with, clear of all expenses, wear and tear of machinery and plant, cost of management and incidental expenses. The cost of machinery and plant erected ready for work for such an operation, first cost of opening the mine, and supplying quartz to begin with, would be fully covered by an outlay of fifteen hundred pounds (£1,500) if steam power be employed. If water power be avail- able a great saving ensues. Now one pennyweight per ton profit, equals fifty per cent per annum. I make this statement, knowing exactly what is wanted, and I am ready to shew any interested person how this end is to be reached, and to prove the correctness of my figures. My effort for the last three years has been to keep this interest alive, almost single handed, in the face of all sorts of difficulties, simply because I have not seen reason to alter the estimate formed when I first examined this country, nearly four years ago. This great question now only requires further investigation, with adequate machinery, and such gold saving tables as I fitted three years since at the Black Boy (from which no gold has been found to escape). Let me now state in justice to myself, as your article conveys another impression, that no person knew of the gold-bearing qualities of the reef now being worked here until I pointed it out; no one has had, or has anything whatever to do with the arrangements for crushing the quartz or saving gold from same but myself, I have designed and made the tables used here, and I have also done all the mechanical work connected with the mine and machine with my own hands, without assistance from anyone from Victoria, or elsewhere. If there be any credit due for what has been done here in quartz crushing and gold saving, of late to anyone, it is mine, and if better arrangements could have been made under the circumstances than have been made, I only am responsible for their not being so, as I have to see that the quartz obtained from the mine yields its gold, and to prepare it for market. At a future day I may furnish you with further particulars and details touching this matter. Meantime, I am, Sir, Your obedient servant, CHARLES NEVINS. Mining Engineer. Mangana, Fingal, March, 28th 1863 [156]

See also

Dr Otway's trip to Tasmania

The search for payable gold in northeast Tasmania

Notes

  1. Several authors credit Otway with more than this. See, for example, Cooper, B. 'Black Hill - the White Cliffs of Ballarat', Ballarat Historian, v4 n7 (1990)[1] or Guide to Ballarat, F.W. Niven & Co, Ballarat, 1890, p.49


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--Neil Huybregts 12:04, 26 October 2017 (AEDT)

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