Thomas Price

From Ballarat and District Industrial Heritage Project
Jump to: navigation, search

Contents

History

Welsh born Thomas Price arrived in New South Wales in 1866 for health reasons. He is believed to have had a successful London practice as a miniaturist. he opened a studio at 7 Bligh Street, Sydney.[1]

Sometime after 1877 Thomas Price moved to Ballarat. [2] Thomas Price was an artist whose premises (according to the Australasian Federal Directory) were located on Drummond Street, Ballarat. [3]

Legacy

Price was the major organiser of an art exhibition held at the Ballarat Town Hall in 1884. It resulted in a committee set up to form a gallery. The Ballarat Fine Art Gallery opened in 1887. [4]

Of the 1884 art exhibition the Ballarat Courier reports on Tom Price's cabinet portraits:

...There are forty-six oil-paintings by Ballarat artists, including an interesting collection of the portraits of the mayors of Ballarat West and other local celebrities by Mr. Thomas Price, ... [5]


James Oddie commissioned Thomas Price to produce 24 portraits of early Ballarat pioneers for the newly established Ballarat Fine Art Gallery. It is thought the portraits are on a photographic base. [6]


BALLARAT PIONEERS
BALLARAT, Saturday. — Mr. J. A. Blight", an early colonist of Ballarat, died last week and there now remain only two portraits of living Ballarat pioneers in a group on view at the Ballarat art gallery. This comprises a collection of portraits of colonists whose arrival in the city dated back to the "fifties." The survivors are Messrs R. Pearse and T. Blight, the latter an elder brother of the late Mr J. A. Blight. Mr Pearse, who was thrice mayor of the city, has just entered on his 90th year. He and Mrs Pearce reach ed Ballarat from Geelong in a bullock dray.[7]

See also

Ballarat School of Mines

James Oddie

Notes

In 1881 Thomas Price taught Oil Painting at the Ballarat School of Mines.

Class in Oil Painting
Dr Joseph Usher moved and Mr Bickett seconded - that provided there were six paying students arrangements be made with Mr T. Price to teach Oil Painting at The School of Mines a period of three months at the rate of 100 pounds per annum.[8]


Mr Campbell moved and Mr Mann seconded and it was carried that the subject of oil-painting be discontinued and the services of Mr Price disposed with.[9]


The oil-painting class, formerly under the lectureship of Mr Price, has been superseded by a class of advanced art students desirous of progressing beyond the limits of the instruction ordinarily imparted at drawing classes or schools of design. These students portrat life subjects only, and club together to meet the expenses incurred in providing the requisite models. The class has done good work, and has fully realized the expectations of its promoters.[10]

References

  1. Kerr, Joan, The Dictionary of Australian Artists: Painters, sketchers, Photographers and Engravers to 1870, Oxford University Press, 1992.
  2. Kerr, Joan, The Dictionary of Australian Artists: Painters, sketchers, Photographers and Engravers to 1870, Oxford University Press, 1992.
  3. Rogers, J. W. F. (ed.). (c. 1887). The Australasian Federal Directory of Commerce, Trades & Professions. Melbourne: J. W. F. Rogers.
  4. Kerr, Joan, The Dictionary of Australian Artists: Painters, sketchers, Photographers and Engravers to 1870, Oxford University Press, 1992.
  5. Ballarat Courier, 16 June 1884.
  6. Rogers, J. W. F. (ed.). (c. 1887). The Australasian Federal Directory of Commerce, Trades & Professions. Melbourne: J. W. F. Rogers.
  7. Melbourne Herald, 25 April 1925.
  8. Ballarat School of Mines Council Minutes, 02 February 1881.
  9. Ballarat School of Mines Council Minutes, 01 July 1881.
  10. Ballarat School of Mines Annual Report, 1883.

Further Reading

External links

http://www.abc.net.au/local/stories/2008/05/07/2238106.htm




--Beth Kicinski 10:12, 19 December 2011 (EST); --C.K.Gervasoni 13:28, 31 July 2014 (EST)

Personal tools